A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians, in the Middle and Higher Classes in this Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity

From the author s introduction The main object which he has in view is, not to convince the Sceptic, or to answer the arguments of persons who avowedly oppose the fundamental doctrines of our Religion but to point out the scanty and erroneous system of the bulk of those who belong to the class of orthodox Christians, and to contrast their defective scheme with a represenFrom the author s introduction The main object which he has in view is, not to convince the Sceptic, or to answer the arguments of persons who avowedly oppose the fundamental doctrines of our Religion but to point out the scanty and erroneous system of the bulk of those who belong to the class of orthodox Christians, and to contrast their defective scheme with a representation of what the author apprehends to be real Christianity Often has it filled him with deep concern, to observe in this description of persons, scarcely any distinct knowledge of the real nature and principles of the religion which they profess The subject is of infinite importance let it not be driven out of our minds by the bustle or dissipations of life This present scene, and all its cares and all its gaieties, will soon be rolled away, and we must stand before the judgment seat of Christ This awful consideration will prompt the writer to express himself with greater freedom than he should otherwise be disposed to use This consideration he trusts, also, will justify his frankness, and will secure him a serious and patient perusal But it would be trespassing on the indulgence of the reader to detain him with introductory remarks Let it only be farther premised, that if what shall be stated should to any appear needlessly austere and rigid, the writer must lay in his claim not to be condemned, without a fair inquiry whether or not his statements accord with the language of the sacred writings To that test he refers with confidence and it must be conceded by those who admit the authority of Scripture such only he is addressing that from the decision of the word of God there can be no appeal.
A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians in the Middle and Higher Classes in this Country Contrasted with Real Christianity From the author s introduction The main object which he has in view is not to convince the Sceptic or to answer the arguments of persons who avowedly oppose the fundamental doctrines of our Religion

  • Title: A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians, in the Middle and Higher Classes in this Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity
  • Author: William Wilberforce
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 131
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • 1 thought on “A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians, in the Middle and Higher Classes in this Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity”

    1.  After reading this book, I heard the song, Amazing Grace. The thought which I had was, what does a man do with the life and love God has given to him? This is the depth of question which this book raises in a reader.There are many versions of this book, such as the Real Christianity, edited by James Houston. I read the version from 1797. Consequently, it is a harder read than the more modern, sometimes having references and mannerisms more with the times. On the other hand, once I started gett [...]

    2. A Practical View of Christianity is William Wilberforce's treatise on what exactly makes a person a Christian and contrasting it with what many people claim to be Christianity.His main attack is against Cultural Christianity and he spares no words describing the duplicity and hypocrisy of his day by church-going people who show no respect for the authority of God as revealed through His written Word.His arguments are highly relevant for today since there exists a profound Biblical illiteracy amo [...]

    3. This is an important book for anyone claiming to be Christian. It strikes the heart of the issue and tells us who profess this faith to reevaluate what it means to be Christian. Namely, it is not just being a moral person. Morality has no value without the sense of God's justice that gives it a foundation. It is not just going to church and talking the talk. Christianity is not an external faith, not a hat you can slap on every Sunday. No -- "Christianity is a religion of motives and principles" [...]

    4. Awesome. Puts words to so many things I've thought over the years in a way that is challenging yet encouraging. Plus, it was a gift from my parents-in-law, so I have to like it!It's eerie how many parallels there are between the England that Wilberforce writes about and the upper middle class American world that I live in today--he could have easily been writing today.As I read this, I am convinced that there are many ways that the world has tempted me to abandon God as my first/only pursuit, ye [...]

    5. I was so moved by "Amazing Grace" I'm gobbling up as much information about William Wilberforce. I really want to understand his worldview from the man himself and how someone who cared for the poor and underpriveleged, while being so priveleged himself, managed to remain faithful. Unlike so many before and after him, he did not start out well and then get enraptured by wealth, greed, fame and self-interest. His heart was unwavering in his devotion to issues of social justice. He was also no ped [...]

    6. William Wilbeforce is known for his relentless pursuit to end slavery in the British Kingdom during the late 1700's and into the 1800's; the renowed movie called "Amazing Grace" depicts the story of his passion. And it is the great draw to read this book which would be a major catylist to end the even greater evil that had been perpetrated against a race of people. I found, however, that this work did not address slavery but spoke to demise of the human condition, that is, the decline of Authent [...]

    7. The fact that this was written by William Wilberforce ( 1759 – 1833) enticed me to give it a read. I admire him greatly in that he became a real Christian in his late 20's and lived out his faith in very public ways, influencing his nation towards Godliness.He contrasts at length the system of nominal Christianity in his day with the Biblical description of the Christian life. He calls on nominal Christians to repent and to be reborn by the Spirit of God. He also calls on real Christians to li [...]

    8. Wow--this book may have been written over 200 years ago, but it could have been meant for the Church today. I have to say this book was so revelatory and life-impacting that I will probably be re-reading it periodically throughout my life. This should be a devotional classic right up there with Practice of the Presence and My Utmost for His Highest, etc. The updating of the language is really well done (and well explained) and the ideas Wilberforce expresses are revolutionary and life-altering. [...]

    9. I agree with John Piper, read this book before you read the autobiography. It gives a glimpse of what made this man tick. Read the insight first(this book), then read the biography. The more I read it, the more i felt like that he was writting to 2008. If you are interested in Postmodernism and Christianity and how to ministry in a Post Moderist society, READ THIS BOOK AND CHRISTIANITY OF LIBERALISM!!

    10. Wilberforce's piece is pretty good. It's part "Imitation of Christ" and a Systematic Theology. For a statesman who was heaviliy influenced by the church he takes a less righteous approach say, a Pope Benedict XVI or Mother Angelica book. Definately puts things into perspective for the average Christian to embrace the faith more intentionally.

    11. What grand and yet personally applicable insights into the way to live a Christian life William Wilberforce wrote for us. Reading his book, you feel that he sees us today; his writings are prescriptive to our current society. This is a book not to be neglected by any who desire to understand how to apply the teachings of Jesus in their lives. I look forward to reading it again.

    12. This book is a literary treasure that all Christians should read more than once. So many wonderful quotes and thoughts in here from William Wilberforce.

    13. This book was originally written hundreds of years ago, but is still very relevant to the culture we find ourselves in.

    14. A critique of the religious community in 18th-century England that's still powerfully relevant. Wilberforce challenges those who claim faith to test themselves to see whether they are actually in the faith, and to start actually living it out--not by trying to earn God's grace, but by living in total surrender to God and realizing that Jesus paid it all. The book addresses many misconceptions that still exist today--so much, that I often stopped to ask, "How much of this is Wilberforce, and how [...]

    15. The version I read was updated into modern (but not overly colloquial) English by Bob Beltz. Wilberforce contrasts "real christianity", based on a heartfelt commitment to Christ as a result of grasping the gospel, with "cultural Christianity". He points out all sorts of subtle ways that we can drift into becoming "cultural Christians", but always provides an antidote and encouragement. Thought provoking and helpful.

    16. I bought this book after watching the movie "Amazing Grace". The genuine faith of Wilberforce shines through as he encourages other Christians to live for Christ everyday.

    17. It is remarkable how a book written in 1797 has such relevance today. Could it be that this phenomenon springs from the book’s biblical foundation?

    18. I'm a huge Wilberforce fan. His book is an attempt to distinguish between authentic spiritual faith in Christ vs. "cultural Christianity." These claim the name of Christ, and act morally, but have no apparent life in their walk. Lots of good one-liners, but the text did not seem to flow very well to this reader. This may be due to the 1795 way of writing, even though I was reading a modern, updated edition.

    19. William Wilberforce, Real Christianity In this revised and updated edition of Wilberforce’s classic text, Bob Beltz allows Real Christianity to speak into the twenty-first century. The paraphrase generally reflects the content of Wilberforce’s original work while updating the grammar and vocabulary for the contemporary audience. In the book, Wilberforce challenges the 19th century church in England to move beyond the watered-down cultural Christianity of its day and embrace the authentic fai [...]

    20. This book was not at all what I expected. Wilberforce is famous for dedicating his life to the abolition of the slave trade in Great Britain. He was elected a member of Parliament and when he converted to Christianity he questioned whether he should leave government work behind. Thankfully he was encouraged by John Newton to stay in Parliament, since he could serve God in that position. Of course, what I have read of Wilberforce in church history surveys and Metaxas' biography show there was mor [...]

    21. This book should be read by anyone who is considering the Christian Faith or calls themself a Christian. The original 1797 version by Wiberforce: A Practical View of the Prevailing Religious System of Professed Christians, in the Middle and Higher Classes in this Country, Contrasted with Real Christianity is availablke here: gutenberg/files/25709/ or free download from here: amazon/Practical-PrevaBook Description from Publication Date: January 11, 2007 Just in time for the release of Amazing G [...]

    22. Enjoyed Wilberforce's (updated to modern language) book about "cultural Christianity" vs "authentic faith." Favorite nuggets:"The problem, of course, is that we cannot see into the heart of another. This means that the only way we have of evaluating the validity of another person's faith is by the actions he or she exhibits. When it comes to human evaluation, this is our limitation. But when it comes to God's evaluation, we are dealing with One who does have the ability to see into the human hea [...]

    23. "Read once and pass. This book addresses the difference between cultural Christianity and true Christianity. Though it was written over 200 years ago, it has much to say to the church of our time. According to Wilberforce, true Christianity; relies on Christ's sacrifice alone, not mere morality for salvation, is filled with the Holy Spirt who is guiding the believer in Christlikeness, and does not simply try to fit in with the mores of society, but is constantly evaluating and observing Christ's [...]

    24. "My only hope of a prosperous future for this country rests not on the size and firepower of our military, nor on the wisdom of its leaders, nor on the sprit of her people, but only on the love and obedience of the people who name themselves after Christ, that their prayers might be heard and for the sake of these, God might look upon us with favor."Although written years ago, the truths in this book are timeless. Wilberforce is an amazing example of a Christian whose faith touches and affects e [...]

    25. MehI admit that I skimmed through vast swaths of this book. Very wordy. I should have known from the paragraph-long title. He takes five pages to convey a two sentence idea. But, pretty typical of a 19th century literary style. As for actual content, he makes some excellent points and his lament of nominal Christianity is illuminating for Western culture today, and gives one some thought provoking historical perspective. A few points I disagreed with; namely, a few definitive statements he makes [...]

    26. A fantastic challenge to those who profess to be Christian. William Wilberforce contrasted what he saw as the state of practice and attitudes of nominal Christians in late 18th century Britain with what the Bible tell us the practice of Christianity ought to look like. Almost all of the contrast still exists today (in the United States at least), giving this book continuing application. There are detailed examples and his prescriptions are backed by Scripture. Highly recommended. Also, it is ent [...]

    27. I confess I didn't finish this book, but I read over half of it, so I didn't want to mark it "abandoned." Generally, if I abandon a book, it is early into the book. While this book was interesting, it was very slow reading because of the old-fashioned language and style. During Lent, I read only Christian nonfiction, and I realized that I wouldn't get very many books read during Lent if I read this one to the end. I made the decision that I would benefit more from reading a wider variety of book [...]

    28. This is a serious book that is filled with ideas worth thinking about. It is also a book that I found unpleasant to read, and was tempted many times to abandon it. Seeing the high reviews on , I feel like a heretic giving it my low review. So here is my attempt to explain my review:The scale is subjective, and based on how much one liked the book. Thus, I am unable to give the book a high rating, even as I respect the author and the content of the book. The reality is that I did not like readin [...]

    29. Not at all what I was expecting, I guess. With this being the book that directly influenced the abolition of the slave trade in England, I was surprised that there was zero mention of slavery, human rights, anything of that sort. It is more a discourse on the differences between cultural Christianity and what he calls "authentic faith." This was a man in a public office who absolutely put himself out there in declaring his own religious belief. And he does not shy away from challenging others to [...]

    30. An interesting read on the difference between "cultural christianity" and "authentic faith." Wilberforce's words, edited by Bob Beltz, offers great insight into true Christianity that is relevant even 211 years after the book was first published in England. Wiberforce has so many things to say to us that it is worth everyone reading this book. However, I gavce it four stars instead of five because Wilberforce tends to be all over the place in every chapter. Thus, a lot of good nuggets of truth a [...]

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