Lost Virtue of Happiness: Discovering the Disciplines of the Good Life

We are only happy when we pursue a transcendent purpose, something larger than ourselves This pursuit involves a deeply meaningful relationship with God through a selfless preoccupation with the spiritual disciplines.The Lost Virtue of Happiness takes a fresh, meaningful look at the spiritual disciplines, offering concrete examples of ways you can make them practical andWe are only happy when we pursue a transcendent purpose, something larger than ourselves This pursuit involves a deeply meaningful relationship with God through a selfless preoccupation with the spiritual disciplines.The Lost Virtue of Happiness takes a fresh, meaningful look at the spiritual disciplines, offering concrete examples of ways you can make them practical and life transforming.
Lost Virtue of Happiness Discovering the Disciplines of the Good Life We are only happy when we pursue a transcendent purpose something larger than ourselves This pursuit involves a deeply meaningful relationship with God through a selfless preoccupation with the spiri

  • Title: Lost Virtue of Happiness: Discovering the Disciplines of the Good Life
  • Author: J.P. Moreland Klaus Dieter Issler Klaus Issler
  • ISBN: 9781576836484
  • Page: 176
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Lost Virtue of Happiness: Discovering the Disciplines of the Good Life”

    1. Far from being a self-help book, Moreland and Klauss (MK) define happiness in terms of its more ancient setting: a happy life is one that allows me to pursue virtue. In Christian terms, a happy life is a disciplined life that allows me to pursue the Kingdom of God. Today happiness is defined as “good feeling” (MK 16). If happiness is defined as my good feelings, and if the goal of happiness is to pursue my good feelings, then everything has to center around! This creates what sociologists ca [...]

    2. This book serves as a good reminder that there is greater meaning to life than just feeling pleasure, or a fleeting sense of happiness. I was a bit disappointed in the beginning section, distracted by an awkward golf analogy and the authors’ focus on the ancient philosophers' views on happiness. However, the rest of the book was more helpful, and related more to God than Aristotle (not that the latter isn't worth reading, it's just I don't think his words are the standard). The authors discuss [...]

    3. This is a very helpful, well-written, thoughtful book. My only beef was that the authors seem to load it up with a lot of the typical "spiritual" exercises that are so common to these types of books. Some just seemed like silly filler, especially since I was more interested in reading more of a philosophical treatment of happiness rather than doing the standard retreat-type exercises.That said . . . I do think I will go back and do several of the exercises, especially the ones that concern anxie [...]

    4. I found the first part of this book interesting as the authors talked about virtue and happiness. They compared older views of happiness against newer ones to demonstrate how the views have changed in recent years. I was hoping for an in-depth look at the connection between virtue and happiness throughout the book. Instead, it was filled with practical advice for how to discipline our lives for happiness. The chapter which focused on disciplines was EXCELLENT in its treatment of why and how to l [...]

    5. "The central [principle] is Jesus' statement "For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for me will find it" (Matthew 16:25). The attitude and action of self-giving implied by that verse are not meant to be a one-time decision. They must be repeated over and over daily - through practice. If you take up this challenge - a dedication to dedicate to humble self-giving in the manner of Christ, the practice of God's presence, the aim to embrace God's hiddenness and [...]

    6. I think my main frustration with this book stems from misplaced expectation. Considering JP Moreland's reputation as a leading evangelical apologist, I anticipated a book with greater intellectual content. Instead I found a book that was extremely practical, and sometimes almost too practical. There are better, more engaging books about the disciplines than this book.

    7. J. P. Moreland and Klaus Issler’s The Lost Virtue of Happiness is a rare book. It manages to be biblical, deep, understandable, engaging and practical all at the same time. As few books are, this one is worth contemplating, discussing and putting into practice. I highly recommend it for personal and group study.

    8. A redirection of the concept of happiness and a helpful discussion of the spiritual disciplines. Explicitly evangelical Christian in nature.

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