Making Supper Safe: Why We've Lost Trust in Our Food and How We Can Get it Back

Food recalls have become so ubiquitous we hardly even notice them The massive peanut salmonellacontamination of 2008 2009 alone killed nine and sickened an estimated 22,500 people only a fewweeks later, contaminated frozen cookie dough sent 35 people to the hospital These tragic, inexcusable events to which no one is immune are but a symptom of a broader food system mFood recalls have become so ubiquitous we hardly even notice them The massive peanut salmonellacontamination of 2008 2009 alone killed nine and sickened an estimated 22,500 people only a fewweeks later, contaminated frozen cookie dough sent 35 people to the hospital These tragic, inexcusable events to which no one is immune are but a symptom of a broader food system malaise In Making Supper Safe, Ben Hewitt exposes the vulnerabilities inherent to the US food industry, where the majority of our processing facilities are inspected only once every seven years, and where government agencies lack the necessary resources to act on early warning signs The most dangerous aspect of our food system isn t just its potential to make us acutely ill, but the ever expanding distance between us and our sources of nourishment.Hewitt introduces a vibrant cast of characters and revolutionaries who are reinventing how we grow,process, package, distribute, and protect our food, and even how we protect ourselves He takes readers inside a food contamination trace back investigation, goes dumpster diving, and talks to lawyers, policy makers, and families who have been affected by contaminated food Making Supper Safe explains why we should worry, but it is also a quest to understand how we can learn to trust our food again.
Making Supper Safe Why We ve Lost Trust in Our Food and How We Can Get it Back Food recalls have become so ubiquitous we hardly even notice them The massive peanut salmonellacontamination of alone killed nine and sickened an estimated people only a fewweeks late

  • Title: Making Supper Safe: Why We've Lost Trust in Our Food and How We Can Get it Back
  • Author: Ben Hewitt
  • ISBN: 9781605293097
  • Page: 363
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Making Supper Safe: Why We've Lost Trust in Our Food and How We Can Get it Back”

    1. If you are looking for the answer to how we can get our trust in food back, this book will not be much help. The use of sarcasm and snarky remarks got really old in a hurry (Mr. Hewitt must think he is hilarious). If you are looking for dumpster diving tips, this may be the book for you. I kept waiting for some type of big plan or strategy, but this book comes up empty--unless he is suggesting that we all eat out of dumpsters. People buy food from big corporations because it is cheaper. Big corp [...]

    2. This small book was just packed with information about our failing industrialized food system. Hewitt discusses everything from all the recent foodborne illness outbreaks and how these super-bugs were created, factory farming, the rising use of antibiotics in animal feed, Monsanto and GMO seeds, the problems with monoculture farming, and the inadequate "power" of the USDA and FDA in our food system. After reading it you're almost afraid to eat anything that you don't know for sure where it came [...]

    3. **I won this book in a giveaway**Ben Hewitt has crafted a thought-provoking tour through the American food supply in all its manifestations. He questions not only where our food comes from, but how it is grown or sown and harvested and distributed. He combines science and public policy and "common sense" to come up with more questions than answers about the viability and health of our food. I believe the subtitle to be a misnomer, however, as it purports to explain how we can get our trust in o [...]

    4. First off: I understand how lucky I am to live in a part of the world and in an age where food is abundant, affordable, and generally safe. That said, this book sucked me in immediately because it addresses the issues of food safety vs. food rights, something I ponder quite a bit. The microbiologist in me understands the idea that we have to be very vigilant regarding pathogens that might be on or in our food - and that while regulation is needed, it isn't working very well. On the other hand, I [...]

    5. I loved Hewitt’s previous book, The Town That Food Saved. Many of the things that I liked about that book – unique voice, a focus on people over statistics – are here, but the subject matter doesn’t lend itself as well to Hewitt’s informal approach. The chapters are both independent entries and part of a very loose narrative – something I don’t mind, except there didn’t seem to be any rhyme or reason to their order. Given the topic’s complexity, as a reader, it would have been [...]

    6. While Hewitt begins his exploration of food safety with tales of a dumpster-diving freegan friend, Making Supper Safe is less about fringe food movements and more about the systemic illness endemic to our nation's food safety regulations and the hegemony of corporate farming. Those people unbothered by the incidents of food poisoning plastered across the media should read this book for its thoughtful examination of the food industries - particularly meat, eggs, dairy, and seeds - and the current [...]

    7. I really like Ben Hewitt's books and I plan to read his newest. I learned a lot from this book and became appropriately afraid of eating lots of foods. I do have some quibbles however.I don't think he ended up saying how we can get the trust in our food back.If the reader didn't read Hewitt's bio, they wouldn't know for most of the book that he is a farmer and back to earth guy who lives off the earth, and indeed knows a lot about seeds.I kept waiting for him to mention Seed Savers as a good org [...]

    8. I liked the authorial voice here very well, but be warned that I am a fan of snark. The infuriating subject matter was made slightly more bearable by Hewitt's irreverence and wit. Not that he didn't take his subject seriously, not at all. The malfeasance of Big Agra and the collaboration of Big Government with regard to food safety are explained herein quite eloquently. The part that's missing is the second half of the title: "and how we can get it back". Aside from growing my own and buying onl [...]

    9. Packed with anecdotal tales of outbreaks, activists, lawyers, street nutritionists, scientists and farmers, this book is brimming with crucial information. Hewitt writes poetically and his humor helps move the reader through the highbrow and oftentimes disheartening summaries of the numerous scientific reports and articles cited. This book is not only critical reading but it is also smooth and tasty. I declare it to be quite yummy!Read the entire review here: boldbookworm/mss51812ml~ BBboldbookw [...]

    10. I expected something academic and polemical, with lots of footnotes, but the book turned out to have a very readable anecdotal style, almost a diary, with lots of the first person singular. The 16 or so chapters dealt with areas in the food chain (covering almost everything except agribusiness damage to the soil) as he researched them, interviewing high-profile people in each area. Full of good stories and plenty of facts interestingly presented.

    11. A quick, entertaining read about how we've become alienated from food "production" and the consequences, real and possible. Admittedly the author has an agenda and some biases, but since they pretty much match my own they're not such a big deal.If nothing else, you'll get some interesting dumpster-diving tips ;-)

    12. I really can't gush enough about how much I loved this book. It's extremely well written, with enough tongue and cheek to not make it something to slog through, with a TON of information. Absolutely brilliant.

    13. An in depth investigation of the American food industry. Explores how big business and the government control the food available to us. Free copy for review purposes.

    14. Don Hewlitt investigates the food conglomerates regarding disease and other control of the food industry. His biases become evident as he narrates the book.

    15. Nice writing. This book presents a well laid out argument against "vertical agriculture", peppered with entertaining and interesting personal anecdotes.

    16. Chatty but thought-provoking. Read "The World According to Monsanto for a more serious, academic approach to just one of the issues Hewitt treats in this book.

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