Who Killed Zebedee?

Undisputed master of sensation fiction and forefather of the modern crime story, Wilkie Collins was also a supreme chronicler of the dark underside of Victorian London Chilling in the extreme, these three short stories of murder and suspense are outstanding examples of his craft Setting himself in front of the station fire, a young policeman is little prepared for theUndisputed master of sensation fiction and forefather of the modern crime story, Wilkie Collins was also a supreme chronicler of the dark underside of Victorian London Chilling in the extreme, these three short stories of murder and suspense are outstanding examples of his craft Setting himself in front of the station fire, a young policeman is little prepared for the account of bloody murder that will be relayed that night It seems that Mrs Crosscapel s lodging house is a place of dark secrets and buried passions emotions that will soon cloud even his own judgment As with the other short stories included here, Who Killed Zebedee is a brilliant and highly original tale of horror and the macabre.
Who Killed Zebedee Undisputed master of sensation fiction and forefather of the modern crime story Wilkie Collins was also a supreme chronicler of the dark underside of Victorian London Chilling in the extreme these t

  • Title: Who Killed Zebedee?
  • Author: Wilkie Collins Martin Jarvis
  • ISBN: 9781843910190
  • Page: 142
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Who Killed Zebedee?”

    1. Collins can tell a good story and certainly knew his audience! If I'd been a bored Victorian lady with nothing more than a card game or embroidery to do til a rich bloke showed up, I'd have devoured these 'sensationalist' stories of romantic rivalry, murder and desperation. One set in low life London, the other on a farm in New England. Really interesting contemporary details make them 'real', and therefore, convincing.

    2. This was a short Wilkie Collins read, the book consisting of two stories. The subject material was of his typical work and had the stories been longer, Collins would have had an easier time illustrating the details of his characters. However trivial this book might seem though, the author still left his impression on me. As I started up another book after finishing this one, I missed experiencing Collins's extraordinary talent of story telling.

    3. I wanted something short to read from the Library and this looked a good bet, but it wan't for me.I find reading Collins something of a cross between and wallow and a wade, and wonder if the chances of my enjoying him would be enhanced by time travel. Perhaps Victorian readers would have been in the 'sensationalist' groove and have found these early whodunnits exciting and relatively novel. But for me, these stories were rather more a case of a writer spinning out his yarn further than it can re [...]

    4. Perhaps it's due to the over-abundance of detective novels in this day and age and how much they draw from Collins's work, but the reveal that the cook was the killer as well as the scorned lover of the victim felt old, as did the attempts to mislead the reader with red herrings on almost every page. While it's definitely worth one read, there's absolutely no reason to ever pick it up again and, unless you're a collector, it's better to borrow it from your local library than buy it.

    5. the man who left police force years ago recalls a murder which he left intentionally unsolved even though he knew who was the murderer.Mr zebedes stays with his wife in the lodgers,stabbed to death while his wife thinks she killed him while she sleepwalked.His wife does not remember much except the last moment before shewent to sleepe read a book which is about a man who kills her wife during his sleepwalk.police suspects first the man living in the same lodgers who recently insulted mrs zebedee [...]

    6. I do love Wilkie Collins. His mysteries, his heroines, his plots. I thought this book was one story, but it happened to be two, "Who Killed Zebedee?" and "John Jago's Ghost". The first one is a murder story about revenge. I thought it was longer, but then it ended and it was a bit startling. But it was ok. The resolution was quite expected. "John Jago's Ghost" is the longer story of the two, and I think, more interesting. Wilkie Collins was inspired to write it by an event he read on a newspaper [...]

    7. A short book containing the very short story ‘Who Killed Zebedee?’ and the longer novella length story ‘John Jago’s Ghost’, which is also known by the title ‘The Dead Alive’. I found these stories very enjoyable, written in Wilkie Collins usual economical no-nonsense style and containing themes which readers of Collins will find very familiar.

    8. due raccontini per svagarsi: il primo, "who killed zebedee?" è poco più di un divertimento, il secondo, "the ghost of john jago" ha più corpo e ambizione. sono chiaramente opere minori, ma collins sa intrattenere anche nella brevità e le storie hanno quel pizzico di suspence che impedisce di annoiarsi.

    9. This book contained 2 short stories, "Who Killed Zebedee" and "John Jago's Ghost". They were both easy reads. The latter was based on a true happening in the USA in the 1870s. I like Collins' writing although it does differ in language from our more modern authors.

    10. This book contains two typical Wilkie novellas--fast-paced and enjoyable, though not on the level of his great novels. John Jago's Ghost was interesting in that it took place in the US, in the midwest and contained Wilkie's ideas about Americans.

    11. This slim book also contains a 2nd longer short-story called "John Jago's Ghost." Both are page-turners that keep you questioning. I enjoyed them both. These are the first short stories I've read by Collins, I think (I've read 3 of his novels) and they are 'full' despite their length.

    12. This was actually two short story murder mysteries by a fantastic author. I liked both stories, but I think I liked the second, "John Jago's Ghost" better.

    13. Interesting fact, Wilkie Collins was friends with Charles Dickens! Great novel. I'm looking forward to reading The Woman in White and The Moonstone.

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