In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin

The time is 1933, the place, Berlin, when William E Dodd becomes America s first ambassador to Hitler s Germany in a year that proved to be a turning point in history.A mild mannered professor from Chicago, Dodd brings along his wife, son, and flamboyant daughter, Martha At first Martha is entranced by the parties and pomp, and the handsome young men of the Third Reich The time is 1933, the place, Berlin, when William E Dodd becomes America s first ambassador to Hitler s Germany in a year that proved to be a turning point in history.A mild mannered professor from Chicago, Dodd brings along his wife, son, and flamboyant daughter, Martha At first Martha is entranced by the parties and pomp, and the handsome young men of the Third Reich with their infectious enthusiasm for restoring Germany to a position of world prominence Enad of the New Germany, she has one affair after another, including with the suprisingly honorable first chief of the Gestapo, Rudolf Diels But as evidence of Jewish persecution mounts, confirmed by chilling first person testimony, her father telegraphs his concerns to a largely indifferent State Department back home Dodd watches with alarm as Jews are attacked, the press is censored, and drafts of frightening new laws begin to circulate As that first year unfolds and the shadows deepen, the Dodds experience days full of excitement, intrigue, romance and ultimately, horror, when a climactic spasm of violence and murder reveals Hitler s true character and ruthless ambition.Suffused with the tense atmosphere of the period, and with unforgettable portraits of the bizarre Goring and the expectedly charming yet wholly sinister Goebbels, In the Garden of Beasts lends a stunning, eyewitness perspective on events as they unfold in real time, revealing an era of surprising nuance and complexity The result is a dazzling, addictively readable work that speaks volumes about why the world did not recognize the grave threat posed by Hitler until Berlin, and Europe, were awash in blood and terror.
In the Garden of Beasts Love Terror and an American Family in Hitler s Berlin The time is the place Berlin when William E Dodd becomes America s first ambassador to Hitler s Germany in a year that proved to be a turning point in history A mild mannered professor from Ch

  • Title: In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin
  • Author: Erik Larson
  • ISBN: 9780307887955
  • Page: 384
  • Format: ebook
  • 1 thought on “In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin”

    1. Picture Principal Skinner from The Simpsons and Paris Hilton going to Nazi Germany, and you’ll have a pretty good idea of what this book is like.I was split on Erik Larson’s The Devil in the White City because I found the half of the book about the 1893 Chicago’s World Fair incredibly interesting but thought the other half about serial killer H.H. Holmes to be just another true crime gore fest. Then in Thunderstruck he again gave us some nice pop history with the story of Marconi and the i [...]

    2. I didn't think you could make the rise of Hitler boring, butis was. Ever so much. 300 pages of "But unknown to Dodd, all the rich dudes in the US hated him and were saying things like blah blah blah" and "Martha was having yet another affair" and "Everyone in Berlin seemed happy but THE ATMOSPHERE WAS TENSE" that all led up to a rather anticlimactic Night of the Long Knives. I really just didn't care for anyone in the Dodd family - Dodd himself seemed stuffy and did not, over the course of the b [...]

    3. Be prepared to stay up reading into the wee hours once you get your hands on this book. It held my interest better than any novel, and it filled in all the gaps in my understanding of how Hitler was able to gain so much power so quickly, with so little opposition. Erik Larson used the detailed diaries of William E. Dodd and his daughter Martha to reconstruct "a year in the life" for Americans in Berlin from 1933 to 1934.William Dodd had no idea what he was saying yes to when President Roosevelt [...]

    4. In 1933, William Dodd, a Chicago academic is appointed the first American ambassador to Hitler’s Germany. He enters this cauldron accompanied by his family, most particularly by his very modern daughter, Martha. Larson shows us the quickly changing Germany of 1933 through their eyes. While this is hardly a man-on-the-strasse point of view, a look at the goings on through the experiences of a diplomat and his daughter does get a bit closer to the ground than a more removed historical overview. [...]

    5. Ambassador Dodd, perhaps one of the most unusual ambassadors to a major country we have ever had, was initially reluctant to criticize the Hitler regime, mainly due to his nostalgic memories of the time he spent studying in Germany decades before. But it didn't take him too long to figure out just how horrible the Nazis already were in 1933 and 1934. Dodd's opponents in the State Department wouldn't listen. President Roosevelt listened, seemed to agree, but did nothing.It seems clear from this p [...]

    6. کتاب تاریخی خوبی بود در رابطه با آلمان در زمان به قدرت رسیدن هیتلر، قبل از جنگ جهانی دوم. کتاب خوبیه در این زمینه، حوصله سر بر نیست، تحقیقات خوبی پشتش صورت گرفته و سیستم روایتش خوبه (ترسناکه) و همچنین این گزینه رو هم پیش روتون میزاره که تصمیمات رو از دید تصمیم گیرنده ببینید. جال [...]

    7. Want to know what it would be like to try to talk Satan out of being such a dick? Consider reading In the Garden of Beasts!Erudite but ineffectual historian, Dr. William E. Dodd was chosen to be Ambassador to Germany in the decade leading up to WWII, because President Roosevelt couldn't find anyone else willing to take on the job. In 1933 Dodd was tasked with handling relations with a rabid and deranged political phoenix named Adolf Hitler. Perhaps you've heard of him?Dodd has brought along his [...]

    8. This story covers the Dodd family and their lives amongst the beast machine of Hitler's Nazi Germany. Rosevelt asked Dodd to become the American ambassador to Hitler's Germany. At that time Germany was in debt to America and owed loads of money and they looked like they were not going to pay so the need for the ambassador arose. Dodd and his wife agreed to the position and so they left for Berlin, he also invited his two grown children Martha and Bill. The lovely Martha appears in the story quit [...]

    9. On November 9-10, 1938 Nazi Germany, using SA storm troopers and sympathetic civilians, carried out the Kristallnacht, or Night of Broken Glass, a series of systematic attacks targeting Jewish homes and businesses. Almost 100 people were killed and thousands were wounded and or arrested and sent to concentration camps. United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a harsh condemnation, stating that “he could scarcely believe such a thing could happen in a twentieth century civilization [...]

    10. I loved Erik Larson's 'The Devil in the White City', I found the subject matter fascinating and the writing fabulous. 'In the Garden of Beasts' is the second book I've read by Larson and I'm sorry to say the two don't compare.I've read a fair number of books about the Holocaust and I did find the political maneuvering described in 'Garden' interesting in a stomach turning, sickening kind of way. But the people in this story never came to life for me, with the exception of Martha Dodd who I didn' [...]

    11. A few months ago, I finally figured out how to borrow audiobooks from the library and listen to them on my phone, which has been great for both my commute and my to-read list (lately I don't seem to have the time or inclination to sit down and read books for long periods of time, so this is helping me feel less useless). Erik Larson's In the Garden of Beasts was one of the first books I downloaded, and I listened to it in February of 2017. Listening to a book detailing the slow rise of a fascist [...]

    12. 2 1/2 stars "It was okay." That's what two stars mean. IMO, this book is over-hyped. It has some interesting parts, like a bit of an inside view of events and people, both German and American officials and citizens. We see through their eyes how Hitler was able to take more and more power over Germany. There are parts that are interesting, like several appearances of the Jewish Bella Fromm, a popular society journalist of the day. She brought intelligence and wit into this book whenever she appe [...]

    13. Eric Larsen has a talent for taking a big event, like the Galveston flood of 1900 (Isaac's Storm), the Chicago World's Fair of 1893 (The Devil in the White City) , or the implementation of the transatlantic cable (Thunderstruck) and combining it with a compelling individual's story. He uses the broader context of historical events and personalizes it, so that, in effect, the parts become greater than the sum of the whole.In his latest book, In the Garden of Beasts, Larson takes on the rise to po [...]

    14. UPDATE: OhMyHannah! I finally finished this flipping book. I really appreciated the information and content. As a 30 year old I can look back at the story of the Nazis and say, "What the?!! How could a whole international community even ALLOW this dynasty to begin?" This book will answer that question. The story is of William Dodd, a mild-mannered college professor who is appointed ambassador to Germany after basically everyone else refuses the job. He brings his wife, his college age son, and h [...]

    15. This is the newest book by the author who wrote The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America. If you are a history aficionado like me, especially if you are intrigued by Germany during the time of the Third Reich, then this is the book for you. Through the eyes of the American ambassador to Berlin and his adult daughter, Mr. Larson shows in stunning fashion how the world was determined to ignore the warning signs, and thus the true intent of Hitler and [...]

    16. Quite possibly the most boring book written on one of the most riveting times in recent history. I struggled to get through this. Larson raises many good questions, namely WHY was the international community so ready to ignore the ominous rise of Hitler? I still don't know, even though it was explicitly asked several times in the book. Not that there is a definitive answer, but I would have liked to hear his take on it after doing so much research on the subject. I also found it strange that he [...]

    17. The amount of cautionary stories with the backdrop of Nazi Germany or WWII in general is astronomical. We all know we don't want something like this to happen again. And yet, to read something like this and realize that all the warning signs were clearly present and just as clearly ignored is what infuriates me. People saw what was happening and brushed it off, assuming that somehow things would stop before they went too far. Did they have too much faith in the system? And what exactly is the sy [...]

    18. I guess I could call this a group biography of William Dodd, a mild-mannered Midwestern professor who became US Ambassador to Germany in 1933, and his daughter Martha Dodd, a female playboy who quickly became infatuated with the glamour of Berlin nightlife. It makes for a readable story as well as a discussion of international attitudes (and blindspots) towards the Nazis as they consolidated power. Martha's memoir seems to have been particularly revealing in regard to her initial fascination wit [...]

    19. An insider's view of Hitler's rise, In the Garden of Beasts details William E. Dodd's time as the United States Ambassador to Germany from 1933-1937. Not being an avid non-fiction reader (although I'm getting better about that), it is sometimes hard for me get through a book choc full of dates, geography and personal titles without either being royally confused or painfully bored. I need actual "stories" to flesh out what I'm reading and enable me to have some pictures in my head so I can keep u [...]

    20. A completely riveting book, dealing mostly with one pivotal year, 1933, during the last few ticks of the clock before Hitler seized total power in Germany. Larson parses every faction of the Nazi Party; every evil personality, every evil viewpoint, every indefensible position, in clear, breathlessly thrilling prose.Roosevelt selects a new Ambassador to Germany, William E. Dodd. As he later finds out, he's not the President's first choice, or his second, or his third. No one wants the job, recogn [...]

    21. Although not Jewish, I grew up among Holocaust survivors and displaced Jews. They could never answer the question: "How could such civilized people commit such atrocities?" and not just in Germany. This book comes a little closer to answering the question. I feel as if the incremental evil perpetrated by the Nazis desensitized people and caused them to ignore it. The infatuation with the Nazis was due to their carefully controlled message and the power of that message (early Martha Dodd). Also, [...]

    22. Interesting book with a lot of value. There's a real warning here as well as a look at the rise of Hitler and the Nazis through multiple eyes. I think there are some applicable lessons in this volume that apply to situations that are current.William Dodd was in many ways a sort of square peg in a round hole when he became America's ambassador to Germany in 1933. He seems (according to Mr. Larson) to have become ambassador because it was a post very few wanted. He had hoped to get an appointment [...]

    23. This was a very interesting read for me that read almost like fiction. I learned new things about Hitler and Germany. The book takes place just as Hitler is gaining power. The author uses excerpts from people's diaries which gave me a real feel for the time as opposed to just reciting facts. A significant part of the book is about Dodd's daughter Martha. She had many "friends", Nazi's Russians, artists, journalists, etc. To quote a GR friend "she was a trip"! Recommended!

    24. Εξαιρετικά ενδιαφέρον βιβλίο που καταπιάνεται με τα πρώτα χρόνια της εξουσίας του Χίτλερ (ο οποίος ας θυμηθούμε ότι ανέβηκε κοινοβουλευτικά στην εξουσία και όχι με πραξικόπημα) και της ανόδου του φασισμού στη χώρα του Γκαίτε και του Μπετόβεν, όπως τονίζεται και προς το τέλ [...]

    25. Before you even think of reading Erik Larson’s latest masterwork, clear your calendar, call in sick, send the kids to grandma’s, and place all your evening plans on hold. You will not want to come up for air until you’ve reached the last pages. It’s that good.In his preface, Larson writes, “Once, at the dawn of a very dark time, an American father and daughter found themselves suddenly transported from their snug home in Chicago to the heart of Hitler’s Berlin. They remained there fo [...]

    26. *3.5 stars. William E. Dodd was not President Roosevelt's first choice for his ambassador to Germany in 1933 and many in Washington thought the mild-mannered college history professor was ill-suited for the job. He wasn't rich and flamboyant; he wasn't a member of the "pretty good club" of Harvard-educated career diplomats; and he had no talent for playing political games. He was however a "pleasing, interesting person with a fine sense of humor and simple modesty." He felt his job was to be a r [...]

    27. Συγκλονιστική η εξιστόρηση της τρελής πορείας του Χίτλερ (κατά τα έτη 1933-1937) σε συνδυασμό με τον στρουθοκαμηλισμό Αμερικανών και Ευρωπαίων, από τη σελίδα 280 όμως και κάτω-πιο πριν είναι άκρως ανιαρή η εξιστόρηση πάμπολλων λεπτομερειών.

    28. There is so much to be said about the careful structuring of this book. The information here was taken from so many memoirs, diaries, and hard research (mostly from the Library of Congress). I couldn't help reading a few pages and envisioning piles of notes, writing cards, and opened books. Yet somehow Larson placed this all within a narrative structure that is easy to follow. He found a story within the details and laid it bare. I've read nonfiction that tends to be too academic or matter-of-fa [...]

    29. I've said this before, while its important that we learn about this material in school, we're being fed information at a time when we just don't care. I was in class in high school when we were introduced to some of the harsher subject matter of the second World War but I just didn't care. As sad as that is, I was more concerned about getting home on Friday afternoon, switching on my Nintendo 64 and enjoying some Goldeneye or whatever the hell I was playing at the time. World War II had ended 50 [...]

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