With the Might of Angels: The Diary of Dawnie Rae Johnson, Hadley, Virginia, 1954

Coretta Scott King winner Andrea Davis Pinkney brings her talents to a brand new Dear America diary about the Civil Rights Movement.In the fall of 1955, twelve year old Dawn Rae Johnson s life turns upside down After the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v Board of Education, Dawnie learns she will be attending a previously all white school She s the only one of her friendsCoretta Scott King winner Andrea Davis Pinkney brings her talents to a brand new Dear America diary about the Civil Rights Movement.In the fall of 1955, twelve year old Dawn Rae Johnson s life turns upside down After the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v Board of Education, Dawnie learns she will be attending a previously all white school She s the only one of her friends to go to this new school and to leave the comfort of all that is familiar to face great uncertainty in the school year ahead.However, not everyone supports integration and much of the town is outraged at the decision Dawnie must endure the harsh realities of racism firsthand, while continuing to work hard to get a good education and prove she deserves the opportunity But the backlash against Dawnie s attendance of an all white school is than she s prepared for When her father loses his job as a result, and her little brother is constantly bullied, Dawnie has to wonder if it s worth it In time, Dawnie learns that the true meaning of justice comes from remaining faithful to the integrity within oneself.
With the Might of Angels The Diary of Dawnie Rae Johnson Hadley Virginia Coretta Scott King winner Andrea Davis Pinkney brings her talents to a brand new Dear America diary about the Civil Rights Movement In the fall of twelve year old Dawn Rae Johnson s life turns u

  • Title: With the Might of Angels: The Diary of Dawnie Rae Johnson, Hadley, Virginia, 1954
  • Author: Andrea Davis Pinkney
  • ISBN: 9780545297059
  • Page: 277
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “With the Might of Angels: The Diary of Dawnie Rae Johnson, Hadley, Virginia, 1954”

    1. Now I want to go back and reread some of the Dear America books from when I was a kid, because this one is pretty great. That's probably because of the author, but then again, maybe they were all this good? Like, I could see some great classroom uses for this one, not to mention it just being a great read for everybody.

    2. Take a seat front and center to learn about the beginning of integration/desegregation in Virginia in 1954. I listened to this wonderful, inspired story which was incredibly enhanced by the reading of Channie Waites. Although the Dear America series is not ABOUT real people, I've got to guess they're based on real people, particularly in this case. Fascinating, disgruntling, ridiculous, unbelievable - the idea that people should be divided because of the color of their skin. My granddaughter lis [...]

    3. Better than what I imagined a Dear America book would be like, which I guess I've just kind of grouped into an American Girls-like light historical category for reasons I don't really have. Pinkney's installment addresses school integration in the 1950s head-on, but it all just feels a little too pat. Dawnie's winsome voice might be characteristic of the era, but it and the diary-entry format grated on me after a while.

    4. Dawnie Rae Johnston begins her diary on her twelth birthday in 1954, the day after the Supreme Court decision ending segregation in schools. Dawnie is one of the top students in her grade at her segregated school, but she wishes she could go to the white school in town, which is a much nicer building, with new books and supplies and even a baseball field. When Dawnie's parents decide to enroll her at the white school for the following school year, she is excited to be attending such a nice schoo [...]

    5. What inspiration! This book was a breath of fresh air. This book begins one month before the Supreme Court ruling in the case of brown vs. the Board of Education. Dawnie Rae Johnson was twelve year old at the time. She learns she will be the only black attending an all-white school. She lived with two hard working parents; her mother had her own business of which she did laundry for town’s people. She had formulated her own pressing starch. Her father worked for the local dairy store until the [...]

    6. With The Might of AngelsNon Fiction336 PagesFinished on 12/15/12This true story is about the young, bright, African American girl, Dawnie Rae Johnson. Her friends and "special" brother, Goober make up most of her life. Segregation rules her life. Dawnie is skilled enough to attend Prettyman Elementary, the best all white school in her town. Not everyone is thrilled that Dawnie is attending Prettyman. People jeer at her and make fun of her. Dawnie keeps her head up and stays and excels at Prettym [...]

    7. This is another book that makes me appreciate how easy it was for me to get publication. The amount of hatred and racism that early black students had to face is astounding. Not only was it extremely challenging for them to integrate but once there they still felt enormous amounts of petty cruelty and prejudice. This character has a lot of spunk and is generally likeable but some of her dialogue doesn't always seem natural for a girl of her age even for the time period.

    8. One of the better Dear America books I've read in a while Though the last time I read a good one was when I was younger, a time when I was not as good a judge of books (or less critical maybe; it's one of the two ;) )

    9. Pinkney explores school integration in a small Virginia community just months after the historic Brown vs. Board of Education decision in 1954. Dawnie Rae Johnson and her parents make the life-changing decision to have her attend the all-white Prettyman Coburn High School in September 1954. Dawnie shares her first year of fear, terror, and, ultimately, triumph as the only Negro child in the school. Along the way she draws inspiration from her hero, Jackie Robinson, the school lunch ladies, and t [...]

    10. Great and very realistic book on teaching children and children at heart about segregation and integration. While many of the worst acts of segregationists are not shown, enough is portrayed to show the difficulty, and struggle of the first children entering desegregated schools and how they might have dealt with it.

    11. This was probably one of the best, most heartfelt books in the series. The story itself was poignant, but the character of Dawnie was captured so well (I listened to the audiobook and the reader was pitch perfect) and it felt like the diary of a young girl, unlike some of the others.Also, the fact that her parents got their own nice, adorable arcs, was really cool.

    12. An important story told for a young audience in the voice of the first African-American to integrate the elementary school for whites in her town makes clear how much effort, fear, and sacrifice that choice demanded from her, her family, and her community.

    13. Excellent book about school integration. The narrator is a strong character, and the audiobook was phenomenal!! Going on my list of favorites.

    14. This was probably one of my favorite books in the series. Not only did it show a time in history accurately, it showed the story from the point of view of someone that was actually experiencing the pain & hardship of the horrible way African Americans were treated in the 1950's & sadly the way they are still treated in parts of the country. I highly recommend this one to anyone who wants to know more about the history of our country.

    15. The newest in 's relaunch of its beloved Dear America series, this book by award-winning author Andrea Davis Pinkney tells the story of Dawnie Rae Johnson, a fictional twelve-year old Virginia girl who's the first to desegregate an all white school in the wake of Brown vs. Board of Education. Dawnie tells us she's always been blessed with the gift of gab, so a diary is a perfect birthday gift, especially prized since it was made by her little brother, Goober. It seems her dream is coming true wh [...]

    16. During the 1953-1954 school year, Dawnie is a normal 12 year old African-American girl living in the small town of Hadley in Virginia. Her town is strictly divided along color lines. She's forbidden by her parents to go to Ivorytown the white section of town but that doesn't stop her from dreaming about the brand new school there. Dawnie dreams of becoming a doctor and she knows that the stinky, falling down school and ancient tattered textbooks of her school won't help her achieve her dream. Da [...]

    17. Diaries are not my favorite format for fiction. They tend to be choppy and do a lot of telling and explaining instead of immersing us in the scene because, well, thats the way diaries are. But I cant blame the author for that. It is the nature of this series and evidently what the publisher asked for.Sometimes fun-loving and cheerful, sometimes angry at injustice, twelve-year-old Dawnie Rae Johnson reveals her hopes and dreams for studying in a clean school with new books. Someday she wants to b [...]

    18. This Corretta Scott award winning historical fiction novel is about a black girl name Dawnie Rae Johnson. Her life is told as she lived through the era of segregation. After the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, Dawnie learns she will be attending a previously all-white school. She's the only one of her friends to go to this new school and to leave the comfort of all that is familiar to face great uncertainty in the school year ahead. She and her family went through hard times [...]

    19. There are many middle grade novels that I look back on and say, "that really wasn't as great as my twelve year old self thought it was." This is definitely NOT one of those books.I picked this up again because I needed some light reading after finishing The Last Star, the final book in the The 5th Wave trilogy. It gave me the pleasure of saying hello to an old friend. I've read this book two or three times before, and of the Dear America series, it is definitely my favorite. Dawnie Rae Johnson i [...]

    20. I've always liked the Dear America series. A first-person perspective with all the detail of a biography, the writers manage to give us enough plot and dialog to keep it from being bogged down in "Dear Diary today I" language that typically fills diaries and bores me to tears. With the Might of Angels is a powerful account of civil rights and school integration, jam-packed with real-life emotion and actual historical figures. I think young readers will be especially touched by this novelization [...]

    21. I listened to this on audio. This was great - I'd never read one of the books in this series on audio and it was lovely! Andrea Davis Pinkney does a fantastic job portraying the life of a brave girl integrating an all-white school in Virginia in 1954. Dawnie's voice is pure and honest and the narrator did a great job. One of my favorite parts about the Dear America books is their extensive historical note at the end, after the Epilogue, however the audiobook did not contain this, which upset me. [...]

    22. A true gem in the 'Dear America' series, Andrea Davis Pinkney writes a story that takes the reader along Dawnie Rae's journey of integrating her local school in Hadley, Virginia. The novel shows the struggles that she faced from locals, students, teachers, even the principal and how she dealt with the drama stoically and with great strength from a young girl. It was a full account that brought up some details that I wasn't aware of or even read in other books! Ms. Pinkney did a wonderful job in [...]

    23. I really enjoyed getting to know Dawnie and her passion for playing baseball and bouncing on her pogo stick. It sends a great message to kids that although life can be tough -- it's possible to get through the rough parts with the love of family, friends and faith in yourself. I really liked how the author worked in elements like the dairy boycott and showed how the black community effected real change by sticking to their principles. Dawnie's friend Gertie was an unexpected treat and gave the n [...]

    24. I loved this book. A great historic fiction regarding segregation and integration. This is written as a diary from the view point of a 7th grade black girl who is chosen to integrate an all white school. It makes me sick to my stomach sometimes to read history and the awful things the human race puts one another through. Even modern day times are full of injustices and cruelties. What a place it would be if we all treated each other as the children of God that we are.I love Dawnie's character. I [...]

    25. This book reminded me how good the Dear America series is. Like others in that series, this one is written by a top-notch author, and is a factionalized biography introducing issues of the day. Dawnie Rae Johnston is the first black girl to integrate her school. The racial tensions of the time become part of this 7th grader's daily life, as she tries to make friends and do well in school. She loves baseball and is a fan of Jackie Robinson.Her patience is tested by younger brother Goober, who we [...]

    26. The "Dear America" book series tends to be mixed bag. Some of them are very good and use the diary format well, while some others quickly become boring and don't flow well. Fortunately, With the Might of Angels is definitely one of the good ones! Dawnie's story and narrative voice are engaging and sincere, and the protagonist herself is a believable and well-realized character. I really liked her determination, resilience, and intelligence. The diary format doesn't become dull or slow down the s [...]

    27. A hard book to read, but a good one. Not hard in the sense that it's difficult, but hard in that it covers some very tough topics--but age-appropriately and well done for the youth market. Some Dear America books can be a trifle thin on characterization, but this one certainly is not--Dawnie is as real as any character I've seen in any of the books! There are some beautiful turns of phrase and painful realizations sprinkled throughout, and while it was a tiny bit over-long (which I'd attribute m [...]

    28. Plot: Sixth grader Dawnie Rae Johnson is chosen to be one of the first black students to desegregae a white school in the south.This is part of the Dear America series. I put it on my "to-read" shelf when I saw it come in to our library branch. I'm glad I read it. Dawnie is a smart, spunky girl who holds herself strong in the face of teasing, insults, and teachers who purposely make school difficult for her. The author uses her research and family experiences to create Dawnie's world. I came awa [...]

    29. Rereading Dear America favorites and reading newer ones for the first time for an upcoming Slatebreakers post has been really fun. This series is pretty consistently high quality. I hadn't read this one growing up, but it was quite good, with a fantastic main character and a willingness to take on challenging topics and avoid endings that are too easy. Full review up at Slatebreakers at slatebreakers/2012/07/06/d

    30. Dawnie Rae Johnson wants to grow up to be a doctor. As a young black girl growing up in the south in the 1950's, her dream seemed to be out of reach. Memorable line "dirt from sliiiiiiding into home base tastes sweeter than brown sugar."Heat, baseball, church, school, friends, Dawnie's life felt very familiar.

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