The Subversive Stitch: Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine

In this fascinating study, Rozsika Parker traces a hidden history the shifting notions of femininity and female social roles by unraveling the history of embroidery from medieval times until today.
The Subversive Stitch Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine In this fascinating study Rozsika Parker traces a hidden history the shifting notions of femininity and female social roles by unraveling the history of embroidery from medieval times until today

  • Title: The Subversive Stitch: Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine
  • Author: Rozsika Parker
  • ISBN: 9780415902069
  • Page: 446
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Subversive Stitch: Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine”

    1. Rambles a bit but this is an interesting (if currently dated) look at Embroidery and how in many ways it has come to define a certain level of femininity. How it went from being a career to being an acceptable way for women to pass their time and how it has been diminished by both men and women.I know from personal experience how little people appreciate handcrafts and how if I quote a fair price for embroidery work that people are surprised. This is an interesting look at how embroidery became [...]

    2. 4 stars for the sheer amount of research; unfortunately the images are not very good quality and are black and white. The book really should be titled something like, The Subservient Stitch: the Link Between Embroidery and Women in the U.K. Since the Middle Ages. But obviously that's too long and not catchy or intriguing enough. This book is a fascinating look at the changing motifs in embroidery and the role needlework played in reflecting, reinforcing, and serving the shifting ideologies of fe [...]

    3. I had read this many years ago, but had decided it would be timely to reread this since I have been reading books like Craftivism, Bibliocraft, Strange material and the Bayeaux Tapestry. This one really did come first, and those other titles follow very worthily. It is a bit dated, but still a very strong book to read, and much of the anger over historical depictions is still very valid. It is still necessary reading (well, at least very strongly suggested reading) after reading some of the titl [...]

    4. A scholarly social history of embroidery and feminism? Yes, please. I gleaned a lot of insight into the evolution of northern-European traditon embroidery and how it became entwined and inseparable from femininity, from the medieval ages to nearly the present day. Although it was written in 1984, my edition of The Subversive Stitch includes a new introduction written in 2010, attempting to bring the subject matter more up-to-date. But really, it's not that dated anyway. Parker's last page, comme [...]

    5. The lack of quality and colour in the reproductions is an insult to the author's research and writing, as well as to the textile work that this book is elevating.

    6. This book has opened my eyes to so much possibility within my art practice. The role link between feminity and embroidery is an important one for all women to understand not just active embroiders. Im so excited about other reads suggested from this book. I will return to this book at various points within my career as I will gain more and more out of it!

    7. I started reading this work on a research trip, and then the library recalled it, so I need to get it back. This work discusses the use of embroidery by women as a mode of expression and in some cases rebellion. I have to say that one of the most striking things I have read in it so far - and I am not too far into it - is a section on a woman who was suspicious of her daughter's needlework. She doesn't like that during all other tasks her daughter hums and sings, but during embroidery, she is si [...]

    8. I really, really enjoyed this look at embroidery and the making of the feminine throughout (mostly English) history. I give it 4 stars only because it would have really been improved by colour photos at a higher resolutionbut this re-issue is very fine otherwise. So many ideas to follow up on from this read; Parker did mention some newer textile artists in her new introduction, and I'd love to read about the path of embroidery past the late 70s where this book stops.I found this inspirational an [...]

    9. Very interesting. Minus one star because I was disappointed in the quality of the illustrations in the edition I have. I would have liked to see color and more detail on many of the pieces shown.

    10. Part art history part feminist history, but all embroidery. There were definitely some interesting bits in the book, but a pretty heavy read all around.

    11. An interesting read on the history of embroidery and women and how attitudes towards it have changed over the centuries.

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