Tomorrow's Children: 18 Tales Of Fantasy And Science Fiction

Eighteen stories edited by the master of science fiction, Isaac Asimov No Life of Their Own by Clifford D Simak The Accountant by Robert Sheckley Novice by James M Schmitz Child of Void by Margaret St Claire When the Bough Breaks by Lewis Padgett A Pail of Air by Fritz Leiber Junior Achievement by William Lee Cabin Boy by Damon Knight The Little Terror Eighteen stories edited by the master of science fiction, Isaac Asimov No Life of Their Own by Clifford D Simak The Accountant by Robert Sheckley Novice by James M Schmitz Child of Void by Margaret St Claire When the Bough Breaks by Lewis Padgett A Pail of Air by Fritz Leiber Junior Achievement by William Lee Cabin Boy by Damon Knight The Little Terror by Will F Jenkins Gilead by Zenna Henderson The Menace From Earth by Robert Heinlein The Wayward Cravat by Gertrude Friedberg The Father Thing by Philip K Dick Star Bright by Mark Clifton All in a Summer Day by Ray Bradbury It s a Good Life by Jerome Bixby The Place of the Gods by Stephen Vincent Benet The Ugly Little Boy by Isaac Asimov
Tomorrow s Children Tales Of Fantasy And Science Fiction Eighteen stories edited by the master of science fiction Isaac Asimov No Life of Their Own by Clifford D Simak The Accountant by Robert Sheckley Novice by James M Schmitz Child of Void by Margaret St

  • Title: Tomorrow's Children: 18 Tales Of Fantasy And Science Fiction
  • Author: Isaac Asimov Mark Clifton Lewis Padgett Robert Sheckley Margaret St. Clair Clifford D. Simak William Lee James H. Schmitz
  • ISBN: 9780860078210
  • Page: 233
  • Format: Paperback
  • Prepare Tomorrow s Parents Activities Lessons All children of all ages need opportunities to learn to nurture, the basis for later parenting Some children and teens have occasions than others to observe and Children s Hospital of Philadelphia Children s Hospital of Philadelphia is a pediatric healthcare facility and primary care provider, offering the best available care and support for kids.

    1 thought on “Tomorrow's Children: 18 Tales Of Fantasy And Science Fiction”

    1. This is one of my treasured SF collections, where I like almost all the stories - and absolutely love some of them.I like children, whether they be in the lying-on-their-back-drooling stage, the snotty-bawling-and-brawling-brat-stage, the neither-here-nor-there-tween-stage or infuriatingly-maddening-teen-stage. Childhood is a terrifying, exhilarating and frustrating banana republic. And don't think it's going to change in the future - and according to the authors of this volume, it won't.We have [...]

    2. It has some of the best SF stories ever compiled. I'm not much on stories about kids, but this collection is more about humanity in general. It does a great job of pointing out our condition(s) through the stories of some of the best SF authors out there. I've read it several times, most of the stories more than once as they're in other books in my collection. I don't grow tired of them, though. Here's the list:Ray Bradbury: All Summer in a Day Robert Heinlein: The Menace From Earth Damon Knight [...]

    3. This is one of those rare collections of short stories that sticks with you. I read it for the first time a long, long time ago - probably in the early 1970s - and I can still tell you without looking almost half of the stories it contains: Asimov's "The Ugly Little Boy"; Phillip K. Dick's "The Father-Thing"; "Star Bright" (don't remember who wrote it); Jerome Bixby's "It's a Good Life"; Zenna Henderson's "Gilead"; Fritz Leiber's "A Pail of Air"; Ray Bradbury's "All Summer in a Day." All stories [...]

    4. This was the very book that sent me on my love of science fiction. I read it from the public library when I was nine years old. I'm sure that I helped that library wear out a copy.

    5. No Life of Their Own by Clifford D. SimakNot that I've ever read Tom Sawyer or Huckleberry Finn, but the characterization and atmosphere of this story was a lot like that - with the exception of aliens, of course. Who would have thought of mixing a Missouri drawl, and extra-terrestrials together? While not super deep It has that lighthearted surreality about it, that makes for an easy-going read. Imaginative and fun.The Accountant by Robert SheckleyA whimsical satire, featuring a boy's dream to [...]

    6. What a shock to see I'm not the only one who remembers this anthology as one of THE books from childhood days! I first read this book when I was eight years old, and had such fond memories of it that when I recently stumbled across a copy in my local library, I had to look through it again. I was amazed to find that it had lost none of its appeal for me in adulthood.The reason for its unjustified obscurity, I believe, is that it was originally marketed as a "kids' book" (I found this in the "Chi [...]

    7. Of the 18 stories that are in Tomorrow's Children, I enjoyed The Ugly Little Boy the most. This was a story about time travel, experimentation and a small ape like boy named Timmie who is under the care of a compassionate nurse. Being that this story is about times travel, experimenting on non domesticated beings (Timmie) the story allows you to develop compassion for Timmie and his care taker. This specific story is about morals, doing something for the greater good and believing that everyone [...]

    8. There are some really nice stories included. I didn't care that much for two of them, but that is just my taste. All the stories were well written and generally concerns children of different ages. (Hence the title :) ) I liked the small introductory note by Asimov it gives a little bit of background on the story or on the author.

    9. Isaac Asimov edited a book of short stories that, though about children, are not necessarily for them. Tomorrow’s Children presents a wide gamut of what the young might do or how they might grow or evolve, and in at least one case what happens when we are faced with aliens or Neanderthals. I liked the stories there were so many writers I had never read before, and of course the one story by Asimov I had read. His fish out of water story the posits that Neanderthals are not nearly as “backwar [...]

    10. I read this collection of science fiction back in the late '60s, and it became a favorite. It may have been the catalyst to ignite my love of science fiction. I was pleased to rediscover it, many years after, at a public library when I moved to a new city. Most of the stories have retained their appeal nearly 50 years later. Philip K. Dick's "The Father-Thing" remains creepy; Ray Bradbury's "All Summer in a Day" continues to pack an emotional punch; and Jerome Bixby's "It's a Good Life" provokes [...]

    11. This is an anthology, edited by Dr Asimov, centring around children in SF. With contributions from Robert Sheckley, Damon Knight, Robert Heinlein, Philip K. Dick, Ray Bradbury and several more, it seems that just about all the big guns of the era are represented. It's a good collection from when SF was in one its most experimental phases and very readable.

    12. Standard "I read this, but damned if I can remember exactly when or why or enough about it to make detail comments" disclaimer:My rating is based solely on my memory of how much or little I enjoyed the book at that time. In some cases, "at that time" might mean before most users were born. Then again, it could mean a couple years ago and that I have a lousy memory.Your mileage may vary. Heck, given how all our tastes change over the years and the fickle nature of memory, my own mileage might v [...]

    13. Individually, the short stories in this collection aren't all 5 star stories, but taken as a whole, it's a marvelous compilation. The stories all all written by SF stars of the 20th century and all date from the mid-century era. I first came across this as a teenager (I may have even owned a copy of it, though I have no idea what happened to it), and the stories for the most part stand the test of time.And anyone who's a fan of the Harry Potter franchise needs to read "The Accountant". Seriously [...]

    14. This is the book that single-handedly started me on a Sci Fi bender that lasted from age 9 through my adolescence! Being a girl, I couldn't relate to all mainstream sci fi, but I did relate very strongly to these tales, all of which feature child protagonists in sci fi and dystopian settings. This is an anthology which features some of the world's most renowned sci fi authors, and is edited by the demi-god of sci fi, Asimov himself. I found a copy recently through a used bookseller, and the stor [...]

    15. This has a lot of vintage, old-style SF stories in it. And the intros to each piece by Isaac Asimov are interesting. Plus the dust jacket has a picture of him wherein he looks a lot like Clark Kent.Unfortunately, it does not contain the time travel story I am looking for. It is, as I recall, much more modern and zany in tone and style.

    16. This collection will always be my favorite sci-fi bundling of unique stories. not so secret cereal ingrediants to life elimination games to handicapped monsters.I love it. I lost my copy in the move from Arizona to Florida but will get one online soon

    17. Loved it as a pre-adolescent, love it now. If saying "timeless" wasn't cliche I'd say it. Great read no matter what genre you're into. Thought provoking for even the inexperienced and unreluctant reader.

    18. Really charming set of science fiction and fantasy short stories. Very dated but still enjoyable. "A Pale Full of Air" is adorable, definitely my favorite short. Discovered some new authors too! Looking forward to reading more Zenna Henderson.

    19. Lots of great original stories that have since been made into movies (for example- invasion of the Body Snatchers; Village of the Damned

    20. One of my favorite childhood sci-fi books that I had to track down as an adult. And, it's still as wonderful today as it was then!!

    21. Love this book! Have read many of the stories before, and still get a kick out of them. Really classic sci-fi, at it's best!

    22. This book, Inexplicably in my elementary school library, gave me (at the age of 7 or 8) a lifelong love of speculative fiction. And it scared the pants off me.

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