Office Without Power: Diaries, 1968-1972

Tony Benn s second volume of diaries, which spans the years 1968 72, is a unique record of British politics as observed both from the heart of the Cabinet and the Labour Party.George Brown s spectacular resignation and Cecil King s plot to overthrow Wilson are just two of the events which dominate the opening chapter, and introduce the last years of Labour s increasingly dTony Benn s second volume of diaries, which spans the years 1968 72, is a unique record of British politics as observed both from the heart of the Cabinet and the Labour Party.George Brown s spectacular resignation and Cecil King s plot to overthrow Wilson are just two of the events which dominate the opening chapter, and introduce the last years of Labour s increasingly demoralised government.And for the first time in a political diary, Labour s experience of Opposition after the unexpected and shattering defeat of 1970 is revealed Here, too, are recorded the bitter arguments over the Common Market, in which Tony Benn emerged as the principal advocate of a referendum on Britain s entry and which foreshadowed the Labour SDP schism of 1981 The result is a fascinating and invaluable document of the times.
Office Without Power Diaries Tony Benn s second volume of diaries which spans the years is a unique record of British politics as observed both from the heart of the Cabinet and the Labour Party George Brown s spectacul

  • Title: Office Without Power: Diaries, 1968-1972
  • Author: Tony Benn
  • ISBN: 9780099634508
  • Page: 127
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Office Without Power: Diaries, 1968-1972”

    1. Surprisingly readable, considering there is a lot of detail here about internal Labour Party arrangements, and technology and industry, which are not really one of my main interests. Candid and witty. As it's a diary it has the immediacy of seeing the events of the time freshly, whereas we have the benefit of hindsight and know how it all turned out. (for instance, here is John Stonehouse, not yet famous for "doing a Stonehouse"). The discussion for and against referendums is interesting and enl [...]

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