Phantasms of the Living - Volume 1

This two volume work, co authored by Edmund Gurney 1847 1888 , Frederic W H Myers 1843 1901 and Frank Pod 1856 1910 , all leading members of the Society for Psychical Research, was first published in 1886 It documents over 700 case studies of ghost seeing, and aimed to revolutionise thinking about ghosts by proposing a theory that explained ghost seeing throughThis two volume work, co authored by Edmund Gurney 1847 1888 , Frederic W H Myers 1843 1901 and Frank Pod 1856 1910 , all leading members of the Society for Psychical Research, was first published in 1886 It documents over 700 case studies of ghost seeing, and aimed to revolutionise thinking about ghosts by proposing a theory that explained ghost seeing through the idea of telepathy Volume 1 includes an introduction by Myers and an explanation of the analytical methods used in the study It then focuses on hypnotism, the telepathic transference of ideas, mental pictures and emotional impressions, dreams, and hallucinations, and contains an impressive essay on the history of witchcraft This pioneering study is an indispensable source for the history of psychical research It provides detailed insights into the Victorian fascination with the occult and the supernatural, and is still the most extensive collection of ghost seeing accounts available.
Phantasms of the Living Volume This two volume work co authored by Edmund Gurney Frederic W H Myers and Frank Pod all leading members of the Society for Psychical Research was first published in

  • Title: Phantasms of the Living - Volume 1
  • Author: Edmund Gurney F.W.H. Myers Frank Podmore
  • ISBN: 9781108027328
  • Page: 458
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Phantasms of the Living - Volume 1”

    1. Massive late Victorian study filled with anecdotes of people (still living at the time) who appeared (allegedly) as apparitions to others who knew them. Contains the famous "Veiled Lady in Black" case that occured at the Despard family home in Cheltenham, England, in the 1880's (and would be debunked--perhaps--in the 1950's by Trevor Hall, who claimed the woman in black was actually the home-owner's secret mistress, disguised as a phantom in order to make her illict visits).

    2. Try as I might I could not get through the wordiness of the book, being of course, aware notwithstanding any thoughts to the contrary, (although those occur from there time to time) that it was penned many a goodFour score and ten years ago, the length of the sentences made it quite vexing and on some occasions tiring. The topic is interesting but the formal and proper Victorian writing style was hard to follow for a skim reader - all the sentences read as though written by a Jane Austen charact [...]

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