Harlem Renaissance Novels: the Library of America Collection

Together, the nine works in Harlem Renaissance Novels form a vibrant collective portrait of African American culture in a moment of tumultuous change and tremendous hope.Cane, Jean ToomerHome to Harlem, Claude McKayQuicksand, Nella LarsenPlum Bun, Jessie Redmon FausetThe Blacker the Berry, Wallace ThurmanNot Without Laughter, Langston HughesBlack No More, George SchuylerThTogether, the nine works in Harlem Renaissance Novels form a vibrant collective portrait of African American culture in a moment of tumultuous change and tremendous hope.Cane, Jean ToomerHome to Harlem, Claude McKayQuicksand, Nella LarsenPlum Bun, Jessie Redmon FausetThe Blacker the Berry, Wallace ThurmanNot Without Laughter, Langston HughesBlack No More, George SchuylerThe Conjure Man Dies, Rudolph FisherBlack Thunder, Arna Bontemps
Harlem Renaissance Novels the Library of America Collection Together the nine works in Harlem Renaissance Novels form a vibrant collective portrait of African American culture in a moment of tumultuous change and tremendous hope Cane Jean ToomerHome to Harle

  • Title: Harlem Renaissance Novels: the Library of America Collection
  • Author: Rafia Zafar
  • ISBN: 9781598531060
  • Page: 138
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Harlem Renaissance Novels: the Library of America Collection”

    1. This review is for "Home to Harlem" by Claude McKay, one of five novels in the vol. 1 of Library of America's "Harlem Renaissance". This episodic novel, set in Harlem of the 1920's, chronicles the pursuits of Jake Brown who has returned "home" after a time in Europe courtesy of Uncle Sam.Good-hearted Jake seeks nothing more than to work hard AND play hard in the diverse yet structured community that is Harlem. Seemingly a 'light' read, there are a few thought provoking portions which keep the no [...]

    2. Claude McKay's Home to Harlem is then second novel in the new Library of America set of novels from the Harlem Renaissance. The novel tells the story of Jake, who returns home to Harlem after the Armistice in 1919.Jake parties away in the Congo lounge, has adventures with gals, takes a job as a cook on a train, and finally settles down at the end of the book with a girl he met briefly in the first part of the book. Not much to it, story wise, but fantastic descriptions of Harlem in the twenties, [...]

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