Earthlets: As Explained by Professor Xargle

An alien teaches an outrageously funny, out of this world lesson on that most mysterious of creatures, the human body Willis s clever and original text will particularly delight older siblings who may also find that babies are a separate species Publishers Weekly Full color An IRA CBC Children s Choice and Parents Magazine Best Kids Books of the Year.
Earthlets As Explained by Professor Xargle An alien teaches an outrageously funny out of this world lesson on that most mysterious of creatures the human body Willis s clever and original text will particularly delight older siblings who may

  • Title: Earthlets: As Explained by Professor Xargle
  • Author: Jeanne Willis Joanne Willis Tony Ross
  • ISBN: 9780140552935
  • Page: 285
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Earthlets: As Explained by Professor Xargle”

    1. Okay, class, today Professor Xargle will tell us about those peculiar, amusing and bewildering creatures, the Earthlets. Special attention will be given to the infant Earthlets and the ways in which its parental unit cares for it throughout the day. This is a quirky but fun little read. Since Horace Miner's "Body Ritual Among the Nacirema" was one of my favorite pieces in my early college years (ah, Cultural Anthropology!) I am already kind of a fan of books that show "us" as "them" and how othe [...]

    2. A rare, genuinely funny children's book, where the picture book format hits the spot with child and grown-up with a heady mixture of slapstick, sly satire and vivid illustration - the ending is just superb. Put simply, it's an alien's explanation of infants and their world, misinterpretations abound in a laugh out loud, absurd yet strangely truthful, way. It strikes me (perhaps too earnestly) that the book is absolutely perfect for the situation where an elder child, used to being "special", fin [...]

    3. This book is incredibly silly and also a must read! 😂. Find your best alien voice and read it to your children. If there is such a thing as a piglet or an owletwhy wouldn’t we use the term “earthlets”? You will get all sorts of dubious information about what a baby needs, does and wants. Lots of smiles for your child while reading.cially of he or she has spent the last 16 months learning how to be a big brother or sister.

    4. Great for inferences versus observation. However, it is not diverse for all students. So, the teacher will have to skip the page about skin color.

    5. I read this book with my Year one class. It is about an alien teacher who is teaching his students about babies, who he refers to as Earthlets. Dr Xargle mostly describes what babies do, such as cry, eat and sleep. There is lots of description in the story, describing nappies as paper bags and feet as tenticles. However, my class did not enjoy this book and found the story rather boring. While the book is not the most exciting, it can be used to introduce metaphors and similies to upper Key stag [...]

    6. Professor Xargle talks about humans in their point-of-view/perspective. Very interesting to learn about these Earthlets and what they do.This is a great book to teach about point-of-view and to allow for the students to understand the outsiders view on things. They have misconceptions about Earthlets and think they understand. The students will then retell the story using the real human words and meanings of humans so we can clear the misconception and teach the students of Professor Xargle the [...]

    7. What are Earthlets? Professor Xargle talks about humans in their point-of-view/perspective. Very interesting to learn about these Earthlets :)This is a great book to teach about point-of-view and to allow for the students to understand the outsiders view on things. They have misconceptions about Earthlets and think they understand. The students will have to figure out the metaphors and misconceptions they have about "Earthlets."The students will then retell the story using the real human words a [...]

    8. The book is about an alien teacher, professor Xargle, teaching a class about human babies. Professor Xargle describes what babies look like and do, and how humans raise their babies. The text is from an “outsiders” point of view and contains funny misconceptions that any outsider may have if they visited planet Earth. This would be a great book for younger students to learn about different points of views, and for older students when they are learning about stereotypes and sensitive to preco [...]

    9. Very amusing in places, but not as good as 'Earth Tiggers' (and possibly 'Earth Hounds' - we'll have to see!). Of course this is the first book in the series, and it's still finding its feet; Dr Xargle's explanations aren't always as whacky as I'd like, and there's no joke to accompany the Earth visit at the end. The book does have its moments, such as burping and weaning onto solid food. As always this is a good, fun book for children.

    10. Toooo funny. Love the perspective taking of aliens observing what we as humans do and how bizarre we might look to alien observers- e.g. Rubbing fat (suntan lotion) until we are cooked on one side and then flipping. Great for teaching the idea of perspective taking in a humourous way to late primary or junior students. Oops I might be thinking of Dr Xargles book of Earth Weather. There are several Dr Xargle books. They are all basically looking at what humans do from an alien perspective.

    11. This book is unbelievable to me. As a kid, this was my favorite book, and I decided that somehow I would use this in my teachings. It teaches children that humans are all different colors but they're the same. Granted this may be a didacticism, but I still think it's good nevertheless.

    12. This story is a great way to teach students in grade levels 3-6 about the differences between observations and inferences. This is a funny story for student to read and will keep them interested to find out what "aliens" think of the human baby.

    13. An alien professor attempts to explain the hows and whys of "earthlets" or babies.Kooky illustrations.

    14. We love this book although my 4 year old doesn't understand it all yet. It is definitely for slightly older children. As entertaining for an adult as the child.

    15. This is a cute book to read to students about an alien’s perspective of what an 'earthlet' is. Children will find the story humorous and interesting. I would recommend it for 1st and 2nd graders.

    16. An alien teacher is teaching her class about "earthlets." Hearing about humans from an space creature's point of view is hilarious!

    17. Dr. Xargle teaches his fellow alien students about human beings and their odd ways. The delightfully creepy ending is like icing on the cake.

    18. Here, Dr. Xargle is explaining things that humans do in ironic forms, such as the different colors they come in. Good for humor and multiculturalism.

    19. I adored this little book! A professor read it out loud in a teaching literacy class and I fell in love with it!

    20. Human babies as explained by the alien Professor Xargle. This is an awesome children's book, and has wonderful illustrations. Playing 'find the stuffed bunny' as the book progresses is great.

    21. I laugh every time I read this book to my daughter. She loves it, too. Not only is this a great book for kids (ages 5-10, I would say), but also a great gift for a new parent.

    22. Visiting with the Glanvilles, and there are three of this series in Maegy's room. Really pretty hilarious.

    23. Remarkably clever and funny despite its target age group. Four or five genuine belly laughs in a 32 page book meant for children is a really remarkable thing.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *