European Medieval Tactics (1): The Fall and Rise of Cavalry 450–1260

Osprey s elite title on the rise and fall of European medieval cavalry during an 800 year period After the fall of the Western Roman Empire there was a decline in professional cavalry forces, and infantry dominated in the Germanic successor barbarian kingdoms In the Carolingian and Norman periods from the 9th to the 11th centuries, under the impact of Viking, Saracen andOsprey s elite title on the rise and fall of European medieval cavalry during an 800 year period After the fall of the Western Roman Empire there was a decline in professional cavalry forces, and infantry dominated in the Germanic successor barbarian kingdoms In the Carolingian and Norman periods from the 9th to the 11th centuries, under the impact of Viking, Saracen and Magyar advances, the cavalry arm gradually expanded from the small remaining aristocratic elite Even so, the supposedly complete dominance of the knight in the 12th and 13th centuries is grossly exaggerated, as integrated cavalry and infantry tactics were nearly always the key to success.This is the first in a two part treatment of medieval tactics, covering developments in both cavalry and infantry tactics Throughout the period there was a steady evolution of training in both individual and unit skills, of armor and weapons, and thus of tactics on the battlefield This book covers key moments in this story of evolution from Hastings in 1066 to Legnano in 1176 It also details the later development of cavalry versus cavalry tactics and the two key set piece battles of Bouvines in 1214 and Pelagonia in 1259, the former an example of abject failure of cavalry tactics and the latter a stunning success.
European Medieval Tactics The Fall and Rise of Cavalry Osprey s elite title on the rise and fall of European medieval cavalry during an year period After the fall of the Western Roman Empire there was a decline in professional cavalry forces and infa

  • Title: European Medieval Tactics (1): The Fall and Rise of Cavalry 450–1260
  • Author: David Nicolle Adam Hook
  • ISBN: 9781849085038
  • Page: 371
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “European Medieval Tactics (1): The Fall and Rise of Cavalry 450–1260”

    1. A quick guide to early Middle Ages tactics; as such, there are pieces I knew already, and pieces that echo other books I've read. However, it's all put together here very well. David Nicolle is one of my favorite Osprey authors, and he does not disappoint here.This is technically part of the Elite line, and follows the general format. However, instead of the usual eight full-color plates of various soldiers of the period, they are all bird's eye views of various battles in progress, that illustr [...]

    2. This slender Osprey volume shows an author with great awareness and knowledge4 of military tactics from 450 to 1260. The title emphasizes cavalry, but the book also considers other units, including infantry and archers, for example. The geographic scope is expansive--from England and Scotland and Ireland and Wales to the Scandinavian realm to western, central and eastern Europe to the Middle East and so on.One theme is the alleged centrality of cavalry and the varying tactics across the geograph [...]

    3. I felt this one was unfocussed, covering too long a period and too large an area and therefor not satisfying in depth. I still keep wondering how these battles were actually fought and how command and control were exercised.The maps and battle scenes are interesting, as always, but not always connected to the text. Disappointed.

    4. Another enjoyable Osprey book, if a bit hobbled by its self-imposed desire to "fight the myth" of medieval warfare being simplistic by pointing out all the limiting factors that meant even a military genius had, ultimately, to remember that combat in this era was ultimately simplistic, no matter how exciting your overall strategic trickery (feints, selection of advantageous ground, the standard set-menu) was.

    5. The book assumes you know what a cataphracti is. There is no attempt at summarizing or recapping except on the dust jacket. The drawings are great. The battle maps, could use some modernizing.

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