Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston, 1870-1900

In the last third of the 19th century Boston grew from a crowded merchant town, in which nearly everybody walked to work, to a modern divided metropolis The street railway created this division of the metropolis into an inner city of commerce and slums and an outer city of commuter suburbs This book tells who built the new city, and why, and how.
Streetcar Suburbs The Process of Growth in Boston In the last third of the th century Boston grew from a crowded merchant town in which nearly everybody walked to work to a modern divided metropolis The street railway created this division of the

  • Title: Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston, 1870-1900
  • Author: Sam Bass Warner Jr. Sam B. Warner
  • ISBN: 9780674842113
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston, 1870-1900”

    1. In Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston, 1870-1900, Sam B. Warner, Jr. chronicles the rapid proliferation of suburban housing developments enabled by new transportation technologies and streetcar routes built in the Boston area during the final three decades of the nineteenth century. He chose three towns in the Boston metropolitan area—Dorchester, Roxbury, and West Roxbury to analyze. Using illustrative maps, photographs of homes and churches, and other statistical evidence, War [...]

    2. This book is straight forward: Warner describes the process of suburbanization between 1870-1900 in Boston, Mass. Warner is focusing on a period of time that most contemporary American's would not equate with the process of "suburbanization", but it is this very approach that makes "Street Car Suburbs" so interesting. Warner shows that the street cars and suburbs were both linked to the increasing wealth in the Boston area after the civil war. Capital was looking for places to be invested and bo [...]

    3. This book was in my personal transit-and-urban-studies library for about six months before I finally got around to reading it. When I finally managed it, though, it was still every bit as good as I expected. Some of my interest, admittedly, comes from the fact that I lived in Boston for five-and-a-half years and have a particular interest in the city. I learned a lot about the specific history of Boston neighborhoods and parts of the city's street grid. It would've been cool had the author focus [...]

    4. Detailed study of Boston's growth pattern, 1870-1900. Originally written in the 1960s and revised in 1978 the book has that 1970s social scientific feel to it. Lots of data and numbers to bolster the qualitative claims. I enjoyed it and would love to carry the book around Boston to study the various housing described within.

    5. Really enjoyed it -- I've become fascinated with the history of our 1918 house and how it came to be built in the location and time that it was constructed. This book provided a bit more context around that -- phenomenal amounts of growth in Boston in the 50 years leading up to the first World War. Interesting read with great illustrations/photos.

    6. Excellent book for understanding the late 19th century development of Dorchester and Roxbury. Good use of photos and maps. Good information on using early census data.

    7. Actually a fairly detailed local history of how neighborhoods and suburbs development. A bit dry and academic, but solid knowledge gained. Warner emphasizes the role of class, society, and natural surroundings in determining how a neighborhood eventually develops. Serves also as a history of real estate in a very specific period in Bostonian history, namely the transition into the industrial revolution. Serves as a model of how research can be performed at a local level.

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