The Voice of the River: A Novel

Missing seventeen year old Kai Dionne and his dog Talia The search for these two spans a single day, morning twilight to late evening, from the time Kai leaps in a half frozen river to save the dog to the hour he and Talia are recovered Each person who comes to the river brings his or her secret needs and desires each has known loss, and all are survivors a home Missing seventeen year old Kai Dionne and his dog Talia The search for these two spans a single day, morning twilight to late evening, from the time Kai leaps in a half frozen river to save the dog to the hour he and Talia are recovered Each person who comes to the river brings his or her secret needs and desires each has known loss, and all are survivors a homeless boy tries to find himself, his lost twin, his double a childless mother grieves for her son and daughter a man who shot his father recalls a tender, intimate night when the father was kind, and not afraid, and not angry Kai and Talia belong to, and are loved by, a whole community As strangers work together toward a single cause, they become family bound by love not only to the ones lost, but to all who gather The perceiving consciousness is oceanic and atmospheric, embracing all living beings, swirling around a person, a bird, a bear, trillium blooming in dark woods, snow, stones, pines singing moving closer and closer, loving, finally merging, sensing and knowing as one, before lightly whirling out again to embrace and love another This powerful current of shared memory and experience, this ceaseless prayer, is a celebration of life, all life, mystery and miracle within an immense animate landscape, a song of praise, the voice of the river Melanie Rae Thon opens a new genre call it Eco Avant Garde, a confession of faith, and a love song to the world.
The Voice of the River A Novel Missing seventeen year old Kai Dionne and his dog Talia The search for these two spans a single day morning twilight to late evening from the time Kai leaps in a half frozen river to save the dog to

  • Title: The Voice of the River: A Novel
  • Author: Melanie Rae Thon
  • ISBN: 9781573661621
  • Page: 459
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Voice of the River: A Novel”

    1. Few writers possess the gift of transforming the ugly into the beautiful or taking the marginal and making it mainstream. In "The Voice of the River," Thon illuminates the infinite goodness inherent in all of humanity by uniting the misfits and castaways in a common cause: to find a 17-year old boy and his beloved dog who have fallen into a frozen river.With lyrical mastery and a good sense of story, Thon weaves each character's unique narrative into a tale full of magic and mystery. A must read [...]

    2. Someone at the library told me I "had to" read this, so I checked it out, but I just don't get it. I couldn't keep track of all the characters, it bounces around so much and there are too many pronouns, and the narrative voice (is it the river?)wasn't engaging to me at all. I almost didn't finish this, but Megan shamed me into doing it, because I never not finish books.

    3. Like all stories, this one is about Love and Death. In this case, though, it's not passionate or romantic love, but the suffusing love that holds together a family or a community. And not the sharp, dramatic death of a murder, say, but the broader sensation of loss and the slow seepage of grief. The Voice of the River is a sentimental novel, but in an unusually rigorous, earnest way, never cheap or manipulative, a novel reaching with all its heart for emotional connections, expanding outwards an [...]

    4. Not quite sure how I feel about this one: it pulled me in and kept me engaged, but didn't leave me with a strong impression one way or the other. The poetic voice was a pleasure, and there are some powerful sections (the chapter about a young girl lost and wandering her neighborhood overnight, for instance). But it seemed to tread the same ground as several other novels (Kent Meyers The River Warren, Jon McGregor's If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things, and Brian Doyle's Mink River, for example) [...]

    5. Very poetic and beautiful to read. Sometimes I got a little confused with the narrative. Probably would have given a higher rating, but wasn't in the mood for a book like this.

    6. Although I competed this book it was difficult. I felt the author tried to hard to be a hip writer. There were parts of the book that were compelling but overall I must admit I was bored.

    7. A 17 year old boy Kai and his dog Talia fall through the ice on a river. The book details the search over the next 24 hours. The story is somewhat spiritual as members of search parties are looking for the boy while reflecting on their own lives. There is also abundant nature and wildlife in these reflections, sometimes too much in their graphic descriptions. The people who are looking for the pair include many "eccentric" people who have their own stories to tell. Unfortunately, I found it hard [...]

    8. Delicately cradles the line between nature's comforts and brutality. Wonderfully poetic & acutely aware of the sonic, visual, temporal devices on which the style relies so heavily. One of the few books I've read where style almost entirely swallows narrative and totally succeeds—still, the leanness of the narrative is still balanced, tenuous. I mean, it's just freaking gorgeous honestly. The chapters where Thon moves in and out of the second person POV are a masterclass show of how to do a [...]

    9. A love song to the world, that's what the prose sings to me. How love and then the loss of love brings together a community around the river, this artery of churning water coursing through this small town. Pitch perfect in terms of truth, with its insights into love and its shadow, loss. The "You" throughout is the boy lost in the river, and the "you," blurs with all the rest of the characters in the book. Soon, you begin to feel there are no borders between people, objects, animals, trees, crow [...]

    10. Melanie scrutinizes every word and phrase when she writes, and it shows in the finished product! This lyrical, haunting story of a boy and dog gone missing along a frozen river, and the day long search to find them (the entire novel takes place within the single day), will stay with you long after you've put it down. Update: This book just won the Fiction category of the 2011 Reading the West Awards, sponsored by the Mountains and Plains Indipendent Booksellers Association!

    11. There were moments in the book that worked really well for me, but over all it was too abstract and not enough developed in the plot. There was a lot of characterization in terms of the individual, but I would have really liked to see more interaction between the characters. Great concept, and beautiful language, but maybe just not my kind of book.

    12. Though I was initially a bit resistant -- to the lyricism, I suppose, and the fact of reading fiction (just someone making stuff up!) -- I was taken by this book in the end. It is nice, actually, to read rhythmic sentences full of striking imagery, and let someone tell you a story, after all.

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