On The Art Of Reading

This is a pre 1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process Though we have made best efforts the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience We believe this work is culturally importanThis is a pre 1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process Though we have made best efforts the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.
On The Art Of Reading This is a pre historical reproduction that was curated for quality Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digiti

  • Title: On The Art Of Reading
  • Author: Arthur Quiller-Couch
  • ISBN: 9781434601902
  • Page: 211
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “On The Art Of Reading”

    1. Literary Critic and Poetry anthologist Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch (1863-1944) delivered these 12 lectures at Cambridge between 1916 and 1918. His major thrust was that masterpieces of literature need to be taught in a way that allows the student to interact with and absorb them rather than in a way that only passes on the teacher's opinions about them. He deplores cramming literary information into students heads and readily recognizes that no one can ever be an "expert" in English literature.Alth [...]

    2. The best way to learn to write is to read good literature and to write. The author gives more excellent advice about what to read, and how literature should be taught, examined and written about. Also read "On the Art of Writing"

    3. A series of lectures on how, what, and why to read. It's almost a hundred years old now, but the lessons are just as relevant to day as back then. Probably the best piece of advice was to read Paradise Lost when I turn 30.

    4. This book was excellent, witty, and fun. It ought to be read by anyone who teaches literature, whether English or otherwise. It was so good, I can even forgive Q for being such a Marcionite.

    5. I love Q. I was introduced to him by Helene Hanff, in her charming book, *Q's Legacy* (linking isn't working right now, unfortunately). I don't often agree with his taste, and I sadly don't have the Greek he assumes I know, but reading him makes me happy. Admittedly, his world was limited in many ways (sexist, racist, classist, etc all stipulated), but the standard of literacy and civility he simply expects and embodies is bracing, and gives me something to aspire to. Just because he wasn't thin [...]

    6. Excellent! So many quotes. Here are a few:"To nurse that spark, common to the king, the sage, the poorest child—to fan, to draw up to a flame, to ‘educate’ What Is—to recognise that it is divine, yet frail, tender, sometimes easily tired, easily quenched under piles of book-learning—to let it run at play very often, even more often to let it rest in what Wordsworth calls a wise passivenesspassive—to use a simile of Coventry Patmore—as a photographic plate which finds stars that no [...]

    7. Mainly scanning through to anything of interest. Most of it is above my level of comprehension. Does discuss much on the Bible as literature. And covers what children should read and why.

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