My Country Versus Me: The First-Hand Account by the Los Alamos Scientist Who Was Falsely Accused of Being a Spy

Wen Ho Lee, a patriotic American scientist born in Taiwan, devoted most of his life to science and to helping improve U.S defense capabilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Then, in January of 1999, everything changed and he was accused of espionage by members of Congress and portrayed as the most dangerous traitor since the Rosenbergs He was even told that theiWen Ho Lee, a patriotic American scientist born in Taiwan, devoted most of his life to science and to helping improve U.S defense capabilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Then, in January of 1999, everything changed and he was accused of espionage by members of Congress and portrayed as the most dangerous traitor since the Rosenbergs He was even told that their fate execution might well be his own For the first time, Dr Wen Ho Lee chronicles his experiences before, during, and after his imprisonment He takes you inside Los Alamos, describes the false charges leveled against him, and tells how his career and life were threatened and his civil rights taken away A riveting true story about prejudice, suspicion, and courage, My Country Versus Me is a vitally important book for our time.
My Country Versus Me The First Hand Account by the Los Alamos Scientist Who Was Falsely Accused of Being a Spy Wen Ho Lee a patriotic American scientist born in Taiwan devoted most of his life to science and to helping improve U S defense capabilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Then in January of

  • Title: My Country Versus Me: The First-Hand Account by the Los Alamos Scientist Who Was Falsely Accused of Being a Spy
  • Author: Wen Ho Lee Helen Zia
  • ISBN: 9780786886876
  • Page: 237
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “My Country Versus Me: The First-Hand Account by the Los Alamos Scientist Who Was Falsely Accused of Being a Spy”

    1. What a horrible tragedy Wen Ho and his family endured. I'm at a loss for words. I remember bits of pieces of this story from the news accounts but didn't think it had any connection to me. I mean, it was about national security and nuclear secrets wasn't it? In reality, no, it was not. Not at all. It was about the government flexing their muscles. How one person in a position of power or influence (and no facts) can cause a whole lot of damage, get people in other government agencies and members [...]

    2. The story of Wen Ho Lee. He was a nuclear physicist at Los Alamos Laboratory whose research involved nuclear codes. In late 1998, he was confronted by lab security personnel and asked about possible spying for China. Events spiraled from there. The FBI got involved. Politicians used the case for their own benefit. There were congressional hearings, leaked stories in various news sources, etc. Finally, in late 1999, he was charged with mishandling classified information and thrown in jail. He rem [...]

    3. Wen Ho Lee's account of one of the uglier moments of the Clinton Administration is a story of multiple dysfunctional institutions. There's the bureaucratic dysfunction at Los Alamos National Laboratory that led to a federal criminal case being made out of a routine lapse in data storage. There's the usual paranoia and dysfunction at the FBI and DOE. There's political dysfunction in a toxic Washington dynamic that had the administration desperate to look tough on China. There's judicial dysfuncti [...]

    4. Wen Ho's side of the Los Alomos spy story. A very interesting tale and a critical look at the powers of the FBI. An important read for understanding the intertwined currents of science, race, politics, and the law.

    5. I am truly shocked and saddened at what happened to Dr. Lee. I'll need to do some follow-up research to see if any of the people involved in his persecution were held accountable (though, cynically, I doubt they were).That being said, I think there were some sections of this book that were a little repetitive, and there were other aspects of the trial that I would have liked more information about than was provided.

    6. So I grew up in the 90s in an apolitical bubble. Little did I know, that across the country, Wen Ho Lee was being held in solitary confinement for the government's imposition that his back up data saving tapes that held nuclear codes were keys to the crown jewels of the American empire, that if shared with another country, they could tip the scales of world security. This was all horseshit. This is the story of an FBI witch hunt on Wen Ho Lee, an Asian American scientist, who through his own ter [...]

    7. This book was a fascinating look into several different subjects. I learned about nuclear physics, the justice system, government protocols and security, and cultural sensitivity. Wen Ho Lee gives a meticulous, detailed account of his experiences (just what you would expect from a scientist). If some of his explanations seemed long, I can appreciate his desire to make everything he writes about understandable to his readers.

    8. My Country Versus Me Dr. Wen Ho Lee, and Helen Zia. Narrated by Fred Stella, produced by Brilliance Audio, and downloaded from audible.The publisher’s note describes this amazing experience as well as I could, so I’ll quote.Publisher’s note:Wen Ho Lee, a patriotic American scientist born in Taiwan, had devoted almost his entire life to science and to helping improve U.S. defense capabilities.He loved his job at Los Alamos National Laboratory and spent his leisure time fishing, cooking, gar [...]

    9. This case was a fairly big deal in my household. My dad, after all, is a Taiwanese-American engineer in the defense industry. Helen Zia delivers this account in a plain-spoken voice, clearly with input from Dr. Lee, so that you do feel like an older Asian immigrant is giving you an interview in his living room. As in a live interview, there's some digression and rambling. But over all it's a solid read and a reminder to examine everything closely.The Lee case was not settled until 2007 or so -- [...]

    10. A eyeopening and helpful read, Wen Ho Lee's account of the events leading up to, during, and after his trial were quite interesting. While sometimes lingering too long on details of his love of fishing and gardening for my tastes, over all the book helped me to have a better sense of the man and it also provided me with enough detail to better understand what really happened since -- unfortunately -- the media, like the government, was too quick to accuse him of serious wrong doing in their clea [...]

    11. I read this book several years ago and was just reminded of it. My review would not be fair at this point, but the fact that I remember this book after a decade plus speaks volumes. I remember being floored by the unfairness this American experienced from the government he served.

    12. politics of Richardson and Reno and Clinton, made life very difficult for Wen. Another interesting read of corruption in admin is the multiple admins of FDR and the internment of Americans while Alger Hiss and others were inside the admin--read Witness by Whittaker Chambers.

    13. The book raises very serious issues and should be read for that reason. However, the writing is very simplistic and exceedingly reiterative to the point of annoyance.

    14. One of the best books I've read this year. A great story about why you shouldn't trust the government. People are willing to destroy your life to get an extra line item for their resumés.

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