Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp!: A Sonic Adventure

The creators of Jazz ABZ are back for an encore With infectious rhythm and rhyme, musical master Wynton Marsalis opens kids ears to the sounds around us.What s that sound The back door squeeeaks open, sounding like a noisy mouse nearby eeek, eeeek, eeeek Big trucks on the highway rrrrrrrumble, just as hunger makes a tummy grrrrumble Ringing with exuberance and auditThe creators of Jazz ABZ are back for an encore With infectious rhythm and rhyme, musical master Wynton Marsalis opens kids ears to the sounds around us.What s that sound The back door squeeeaks open, sounding like a noisy mouse nearby eeek, eeeek, eeeek Big trucks on the highway rrrrrrrumble, just as hunger makes a tummy grrrrumble Ringing with exuberance and auditory delights, this second collaboration by world renowned jazz musician and composer Wynton Marsalis and acclaimed illustrator Paul Rogers takes readers and listeners on a rollicking, clanging, clapping tour through the many sounds that fill a neighborhood.
Squeak Rumble Whomp Whomp Whomp A Sonic Adventure The creators of Jazz ABZ are back for an encore With infectious rhythm and rhyme musical master Wynton Marsalis opens kids ears to the sounds around us What s that sound The back door squeeeaks open

  • Title: Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp!: A Sonic Adventure
  • Author: Wynton Marsalis Paul Rogers
  • ISBN: 9780763639914
  • Page: 267
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp!: A Sonic Adventure”

    1. A fun story that shows how music is everywhere if you simply listen to the symphony all around you. I really liked how things began, the narrative flowed well with the sounds as it seemed very much in keeping with what a kid might notice in his daily life, but toward the end things seemed to get a bit jumbled with more sounds than story. Maybe it was just me--or maybe that was the point and it just didn't really work when I read it aloud. Still, I would recommend it as a way of showing how every [...]

    2. Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp! a sonic adventure by [Wynton Marsalis], illustrated by [Paul Rogers], is a rollicking picture book tour of a busy, noisy New Orleans reighborhood, focusing on sounds.Rogers' detailed illustrations were done in ink and finished digitallty. Lots of details make it clear this is New Orleans, such as the title page cityscape, a Saints newspaper headline, a Jazz fest poster, and the letering on a bass drum. Musical instruments are featured including a saxaphone, t [...]

    3. With several visual and textual references to the sights but especially the sounds of New Orleans, this picture book illustrates just how much music surrounds in our daily lives. The ink illustrations that were finished digitally allow those sounds to receive attention as they move across the book's pages. A boy begins his day by opening up a squeaking back door and hearing the sounds of his home and neighborhood. Music can even be found in the simple act of buttering toast or the sounds made by [...]

    4. Lots of things (trucks, water faucets, etc) make sounds - and some create a rhythm of their own. The reader of this story will need to practice making the rhyming sounds of brrrumble and rrrrumble and grrumble, and tluuck, tluck, tlawck, tlock, tlaack. tlack, tlick (pizzicato violinists) and many others before trying to read this in front of a group. If you've got a vocal group, this would be a great call-response read for preschoolers.

    5. I really love the idea of this book, that there's music all around us if we listen. I tend to like books better that have an actual narrative to them, and this one is mostly just sounds, but I enjoyed it much more than I usually do other books like it. The illustrations are great, and I like the changes in font size to describe the volume of various sounds. Very fun

    6. I paired this with "Mr. Brown Can Moo" for a rhyming, noisy storytime focused on phonological awareness, the ability to hear the smallest sounds in words. The children loved repeating and improving on the sounds Imitated in the book. I would love to hear Mr. Marsalis read this!

    7. 5* art4* conceptAn awesome book for teaching about sounds. I wish I was better with sound effects, dang it! Squirt is all about different noises and loves to identify them, so this was a lot of fun. Incredible illustrations, too.

    8. Squeak, Rumble, WHOMP! WHOMP! WHOMP! by Wynton Marsalis is said to be a sonic adventure, and it is just that. I was so impressed by how entertaining this book was. The narrator is a little boy from New Orleans and he tells us all about his life and culture through the different sounds he hears in a day. From squeaks to grumbles to tlocks, tlicks, and tlacks, this book is like a song with the most interesting sounds the world around us makes. For instance, the “chrrrick chrrrick chrrick chrrric [...]

    9. This would be an incredibly fun read aloud! There are so many great sounds and Marsalis has captured some of them with awesome onomatopoeia. Like buttering toast. It’s also a fun look around the little boy’s neighborhood and may encourage kids to listen to the sounds around them. I actually think this is an interesting activity and something that would be a lot of fun with a small group of kids or with your own child. We tend to prioritize what we can see so closing your eyes and listening c [...]

    10. This very jazzy picture book will have your toes tapping along in no time. It’s the story of a young boy who sees the noise, music and rhythm in everything around him. From the squeak of the back door to the rumble of trucks on the highway, it all makes the music that surrounds him. Throughout the book, real musical instruments are also woven into the loose storyline. There are bass drums, his sister’s saxophone, violins, a trombone, tubas, and even a full band or two. Coming from Marsalis, [...]

    11. I love Wynton, but there are some really unfortunate flaws in this book. First is that it is impossible for young readers to read alone. It is best suited for a 7-8 year old. Second is that it contains multiple grammatical errors. Although this goes along with the jazzy and playful tone of the book, I still don't want my children reading, "I huz-huzz-huzzah a kazoo when I GETS the mood". The words are fun, the illustrations delightful, but they can't fix those two major flaws and that ruins the [...]

    12. diverse picture books (toddler/preschool ages 18 months and up; music / community).* Prominently features diverse characters: Yep! Lots of African-Americans, including the main character, and a diverse cast throughout.* Great choice for toddler storytime: short, rhyming text full of fun sound effects. Encourages participation (making sounds) and has a rhythmic quality that can promote movement, tapping along. Large, clear, colorful illustrations suitable for sharing with crowds.* Book works well [...]

    13. Great exploratory readWonderful to allow students to discover and decide on the instruments to make the sounds! I can’t wait to use this in camp this summer.

    14. Oscar loved all the onomatopoeia! (Although I'm not sure I was pronouncing them as they were meant to be pronounced lol)

    15. This book was written by a jazz legend, and is very simple in its message. Music and 'noise' surrounds us all, and is a part of all of our daily lives. The story, with simple art drawings, is about sounds and how everyday life makes its own music. And some of the simple connections the author makes signal a smile for the readerwhen they connect to things like 'the door squeaks' and 'the mouse eeeks' and his when his sister plays her instrument it 'speaks'. And when you get to hunger making a sto [...]

    16. Best for kids ages 4 and upEarly Literacy Skills: Print Motivation, Vocabulary, Phonological AwarenessFrom cover: What’s that sound? The back door squeeeaks open, sounding like a noisy mouse nearby — eeek, eeeek, eeeek! Big trucks on the highway rrrrrrrumble, just as hunger makes a tummy grrrrumble. Ringing with exuberance and auditory delights, this second collaboration by world-renowned jazz musician and composer Wynton Marsalis and acclaimed illustrator Paul Rogers takes readers (and list [...]

    17. Terms of useThe creators of Jazz ABZ are back for an encore! With infectious rhythm and rhyme, musical master Wynton Marsalis opens kids' ears to the sounds around us. What's that sound? The back door squeeeaks open, sounding like a noisy mouse nearbyeek, eeeek, eeeek! Big trucks on the highway rrrrrrrumble, just as hunger makes a tummy grrrrumble . Ringing with exuberance and auditory delights, this second collaboration by world-renowned jazz musician and composer Wynton Marsalis and acclaimed [...]

    18. A young boy notices the sounds around him. His back door squeaks, hunger makes his tummy grumble, the alarm ticks, ambulances wooo-uuu by, his kite whooo-ushes in the sky, cymbals ting, and he huz-huzz-huzzes his kazoo. Awesome pictures! A great book to read aloud! The text rhymes and changes size to fit the loudness or softness of the sound- it makes the book visually appealing and fun to read. I could actually hear the sounds as I read the words. Recommended for new talkers and kids who just l [...]

    19. Loads of onomatopoeia and a jazzy, rhyming narrative make this a fun book to read aloud, although I have to admit that I would've liked to have heard this one narrated aloud - I get the feeling that I didn't do all the noises justice. Still, the book shows that music comes from all over, not just musical instruments and I loved that it celebrates the sounds around us. The illustrations are colorful and complement the narrative nicely - we loved the different fonts. We enjoyed reading this book t [...]

    20. PreS-gr3Really interesting onamatopoetic book, which connects the sounds musicians make and the sounds we hear every day. It reminds me a little of Tanka, Tanka, Skunk, which is another book that begs to be read aloud. However, Tanka does not use onamatopoeias, so is easier to read. I always find sound words to be a little tricky - and here is a whole book. Nonetheless, I'm eager to read this aloud to a group of kids, because it seems to be consistent with how it rhymed and seemed that it would [...]

    21. First impressions do make a difference. Impeccable illustrations and text! This book is appropriate reading for children of all ages. Centered in New Orleans, a young boy and his cat experience nature's words. Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp!: A Sonic Adventure takes the reader on an journey outside of the book into a world pleasurable to the senses. From truck drivers to this young boy's family, sounds are neither good or bad. Perception is the key and this child's perception is in check. A [...]

    22. Jazz musician Marsalis shows young readers how sound is all around us. It surrounds us through the day as doors squeak and mice go eek, as feet flop-flap and hands clap-clap and then there is the sound of drums, ting, tink-y, ting, tap and piano, pling, pling, pling, plap! Rogers' lively artwork and Marsalis' jubilant text celebrate the sounds of the neighborhood and the joy of music.

    23. Summary: This is a picture book about Jazz music and the different sounds of both instruments and other everyday sounds children might hear.Audience: This is for pre-school and very early elementary. Appeal: Written my Wynton Marsalis, this book is a credible source for children beginning to learn about music.Implementation: I would use this book to do a book talk about music books or a segment about different types of music and instruments.

    24. This book is just as exciting as the title makes it seem. It is written in verse form and is all about sounds. It is a very interactive book where children could help to make the sounds the second time around reading it. Every child loves to make noises and so this book is a fun one. I think this is a fitting book for younger children around the kindergarten age.Marsalis, W & Rogers, P. (2012). Squeak! rumble! whomp! whomp! whomp!. Somerville, Mass.: Candlewick.

    25. A super fun book for young ones letting them know that musical sounds can really happen anywhere. I can see this being a great tool to use in kindergarten music to teach different ranges of sound. It might have been a good idea to include a cd with the book.or a downloadable song to help illustrate all the many sounds that are included in the book. They may be too hard to pronounce without it.

    26. This is sort of like an updated version of Dr. Seuss' Mr. Brown Can Moo, Can You?, but the noises are sounds that instruments make when played. I haven't used the book for bilingual story time yet, but I can definitely see kids having fun making all the great sounds in Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp! I also love the illustrations and the introduction to instruments used in jazz music in which young children may not yet be familiar.

    27. Catchy text layout and simple, yet attractive, illustrations are the positive attributes to this picture book, that blends musical instrument sounds with the everyday noises around us. However, rhyming feels forced and the tempo uncertain in the wording. Perhaps this is a book that each reader makes his own and with repeated readings delivers a favorite tune, but this reader couldn’t make it happen.Lisa Ardas written for the Portland Book Review

    28. In the tradition of CHARLIE PARKER PALYED BE BOP comes a new jazzin' storybook that begs to be read/sang/vocalized/harmonized and enjoyed for it's rhythm. The color palate brings the music alive, without being over-the-top and the mood will surely liven up a storytime. Recommended for schools and libraries and more of a read-aloud or read-together than for independent reading.

    29. This fictional book is geared for primary readers. There are sounds all around us! The author of this book, Wynton Marsalis, tells us of all the sounds he hears around his neighborhood. He hears the squeak of his back door and the eeek of a nosy mouse. Read this book to find out all of the sounds Wynton hears.

    30. This book, written in rhyme, by world-renowned jazz composer and musician, Wynton Marsalis, gives us an acoustic tour of a busy neighborhood. This is more a concept story full of fun onomatopoeia. When you read the book aloud, it sounds like a lot of rambling mumbo jumbo that may either annoy or tickle the youngest reader. Either that or I need to work on my sound effects.

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