How Doctors Think: Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine

How Doctors Think defines the nature and importance of clinical judgment Although physicians make use of science, this book argues that medicine is not itself a science but rather an interpretive practice that relies on clinical reasoning A physician looks at the patient s history along with the presenting physical signs and symptoms and juxtaposes these with clinical exHow Doctors Think defines the nature and importance of clinical judgment Although physicians make use of science, this book argues that medicine is not itself a science but rather an interpretive practice that relies on clinical reasoning A physician looks at the patient s history along with the presenting physical signs and symptoms and juxtaposes these with clinical experience and empirical studies to construct a tentative account of the illness How Doctors Think is divided into four parts Part one introduces the concept of medicine as a practice rather than a science part two discusses the idea of causation part three delves into the process of forming clinical judgment and part four considers clinical judgment within the uncertain nature of medicine itself In How Doctors Think, Montgomery contends that assuming medicine is strictly a science can have adverse side effects, and suggests reducing these by recognizing the vital role of clinical judgment.
How Doctors Think Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine How Doctors Think defines the nature and importance of clinical judgment Although physicians make use of science this book argues that medicine is not itself a science but rather an interpretive prac

  • Title: How Doctors Think: Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine
  • Author: Kathryn Montgomery
  • ISBN: 9780195187120
  • Page: 394
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “How Doctors Think: Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine”

    1. Her fundamental argument is that the "art vs. science" of medicine construct is deeply confused and misleading. Medicine's relationship to science is complex, and most clinical medicine is probably best understood as _phronesis_, the practical reasoning and problem solving described by Aristotle. I find that argument quite persuasive and well elaborated.She does a fair bit of work with postmodern philosophers, and I find myself more interested in cognitive psychological models of clinical phrone [...]

    2. Fascinating read- approaches the medical world & its balancing act of constant trade offs, just as all of us will, one day. The writing is readable, occasionally even lyrical and I found reading a practice in self reflection. Would recommend it to anyone with an interest in diagnosis in medicine.

    3. Insightful book. Although it doesn't fully get into the mind of the physician. Interesting observations and concepts. Tackles from a epistemological and philosophical perspective. Argues that the axioms "Medicine is a science" and "Medicine is an art" are bandied about but not properly defined. Proposes that medicine is a practice and clinical judgement lies at the crossroads of "science" and "art". The themes are repeated ad nauseum throughout the book. I think partly because the chapters were [...]

    4. I'd expected better of this book for some points,some of the chapters eg the taking history part and clinical judgment were obviously logical regardless of their descriptions. Second, is looking at the number of the pages compared to the useful content is overrated.

    5. Interesting, informative, and very well-told. What all nonfiction should be. It gets a bit repetitive at times, but not fatally so.

    6. An interesting insight into doctor's. Medicine is not very straighforward at all and doctor's need to think creatively and keep an open mind.

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