Last of the Incas: The Rise and Fall of an American Empire

An authoritative account of the Inca empire its rulers, and their queens, its unique social structure, its cultural achievements, and of its downfall The authors bring alive a nation whose grandeur is now vanished except in relics like the famed mountaintop ruins of Cuzco With comparisons to modern politics, economics and human behavior, they illuminate the story of theAn authoritative account of the Inca empire its rulers, and their queens, its unique social structure, its cultural achievements, and of its downfall The authors bring alive a nation whose grandeur is now vanished except in relics like the famed mountaintop ruins of Cuzco With comparisons to modern politics, economics and human behavior, they illuminate the story of the Incas as brightly as the gold coveted by their Spanish conquerors That story reaches its dramatic peak with the final conflict between the emperor Athahualpa and Pizarro a conflict between two men but also a conflict between two versions of civilization.
Last of the Incas The Rise and Fall of an American Empire An authoritative account of the Inca empire its rulers and their queens its unique social structure its cultural achievements and of its downfall The authors bring alive a nation whose grandeur is

  • Title: Last of the Incas: The Rise and Fall of an American Empire
  • Author: Edward Hyams George Ordish
  • ISBN: 9780880295956
  • Page: 215
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Last of the Incas: The Rise and Fall of an American Empire”

    1. This book was super informative about the history of the Incas from the entrance of Pizzaro and the Spaniards to the death of Atahualpa. I enjoyed the fact that the authors described Francisco Pizarro as a great leader of his mean but not necessarily a good person. They tried to paint a picture of the explorer but didn't hesitate to put in their two cents about how they felt about his actions. It was a bit dry at times but interesting nonetheless.

    2. I'm rather torn by this book. By comparrisson to Prescott's History of the Conquest of Peru, this is more readable and seems to be a decent summary of what happened in Tahuantinsuyu when Pizzaro showed up. But the shortcomings, the sense that the Inca, as conquerors of other people, were better than the Spanish conquerors; maybe not as harsh are hard to believe. There isn't a whole lot of source material to base this on and I'm betting that any of the conquered people don't look at it like, boy, [...]

    3. This book chronicles the arrival of the Spaniards in Peru and the eventual subordination and colonization of the Incas. It tries to demystify the stories that the Incas believed the invaders were a second coming of Viracocha or some Kind of gods. On the contrary it clarifies that they were not fooled but clearly not ready for the culture shock and the cruelty of the Spaniards. They document how they'd had encounters with other previous conquistadors. The civil war the Incas were experiencing als [...]

    4. This volume may be more than you want or need to know about the Incan empire and what the Spanish invaders did to it; but I was intrigued by the very beginning by how much we (that universal we) know about this ancient place and its people and by how well Hyams and Ordish conveyed the story. The authors do have a perspective on the Incas that is idealistic, romantic to the point of sentimental, a bit too sympathetic; and perhaps they are too hard on the Spanish. That screed completed, I found it [...]

    5. This is a good book, but goes into mind-numbingly boring detail that I've found to be prettywellring. It's a great book if you want to know everything you could ever possibly want to know, but I felt like I got the point well before I finishedwhich.cidentally, I never did.

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