Midsummer

The poems in this sequence of fifty four were written to encompass one year, from summer to summer Their principal themes are the stasis, both stultifying and provocative, of midsummer in the tropics the pull of the sea, family, and friendship on one whose cricumstances lead to separation the relationship of poetry to painting and the place of a poet between two culturThe poems in this sequence of fifty four were written to encompass one year, from summer to summer Their principal themes are the stasis, both stultifying and provocative, of midsummer in the tropics the pull of the sea, family, and friendship on one whose cricumstances lead to separation the relationship of poetry to painting and the place of a poet between two cultures Walcott records, with his distinctive linguistic blend of soaring imagery and plainly stated facts, the experience of a mid lief period in reality and in memory or the imagination As Louis Simpson wrote on the publication of Wacott s The Fortunate Traveller, Walcott is a spellbinder Of how many poets can it be said that their poems are compelling not a mere stringing together of images and ideas but language that delights in itself, rhythms that seem spontaneous, scenes that are vividly there The poet who can write like this is a master.
Midsummer The poems in this sequence of fifty four were written to encompass one year from summer to summer Their principal themes are the stasis both stultifying and provocative of midsummer in the tropics

  • Title: Midsummer
  • Author: Derek Walcott
  • ISBN: 9780374518639
  • Page: 422
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Midsummer”

    1. I pause to hear a racketing triumph of cicadassetting life's pitch, but to live at their pitchof joy is unendurable.A stone house waits on the steps.Perhaps if I'd nurtured some divine disease,like Keats in eternal Rome, or Chekhov at Yalta,something that sharpened the salt fragrance of sweatwith the lancing rib of my pen, my gift would increase,as the hand of a cloud turning over the sea will alterthe sunlight--clouds smudged like silver plate,leaves that keep trying to summarize my life.

    2. Names- for Edward BrathwaiteIMy race began as the sea began,with no nouns, and with no horizon,with pebbles under my tongue,with a different fix on the stars.But now my race is here,in the sad oil of Levantine eyes,in the flags of Indian fields.I began with no memory,I began with no future,but I looked for that momentwhen the mind was halved by a horizon.I have never found that momentwhen the mind was halved by a horizon--for the goldsmith from Bentares,the stone-cutter from Canton,as a fishline [...]

    3. Not his best work. Plodding, convoluted, low in rhyme, rare in wit. The page-long poems are scattered between Boston, England and the Caribbean - individually they are vaguely speculative and descriptive, collectively they are incoherent. The 8-page 'Tropic Zone' about Havana is the most extensive, coherent and interesting. But I only give this book 2 stars, at least on first reading. I suspect that if I reread it after a pause, I may find it better because Walcott is a good writer. But at his b [...]

    4. For Walcott, there is no separation between poetry and religion and mud and race and God and the sun. There is poetry everywhere and everywhere is made of poetry: "note how the earth drinks/language as precious/Then, on dank ground, using a twig for a pen,/write Genesis and watch the Word begin." The poems in this collection encompass a year in the life of the Earth, a year in the life of a year. They're beautiful throughout. As I expected given what I'd previously read of him, Walcott's central [...]

    5. Beautiful verse that practically washed over my consciousnesses. This collection was made to be read aloud in the sunshine in a low, gentle voice. A must-read!

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