Spirit Child: A Story of the Nativity

This acclaimed picture book originally published in 1984 and now being published in both English and Spanish editions brings to life a stirring message of hope and salvation.Beneath the light of a brilliant star in Bethlehem, a spirit child is born to rescue the world from evil He is Jesus, savior of the people, and his story has not been told in these words foThis acclaimed picture book originally published in 1984 and now being published in both English and Spanish editions brings to life a stirring message of hope and salvation.Beneath the light of a brilliant star in Bethlehem, a spirit child is born to rescue the world from evil He is Jesus, savior of the people, and his story has not been told in these words for over four hundred years.This Native American nativity story from the Aztec tradition was rediscovered by noted scholar John Bierhorst and it is filled with vivid language and some of the most striking imagery of Caldecott Medalist Barbara Cooney s distinguished career An American Library Association Notable Children s Book An American Bookseller Pick of the Lists A Library of Congress Children s Book of the Year A Horn Book Fanfare Honor Book A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
Spirit Child A Story of the Nativity This acclaimed picture book originally published in and now being published in both English and Spanish editions brings to life a stirring message of hope and salvation Beneath the light of a bri

  • Title: Spirit Child: A Story of the Nativity
  • Author: Bernardino de Sahagún Barbara Cooney
  • ISBN: 9781587170881
  • Page: 460
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Spirit Child: A Story of the Nativity”

    1. The story of the birth of Jesus, told in the Aztec tradition. Contains all the familiar parts of the nativity but adds lines of heartfelt rejoicing - "The skies will be glad, and the earth will dance." The author's amazement and joy in telling the story are contagious; this is definitely my new favorite version of the nativity story.

    2. "The text is preserved in Sahagun's Psalmodia Christiana (Mexico, 1583)," reads the tiny print on the copyright page. This was a book written entirely in the Aztec language and one of the first books to be published in the so-called New World.It was actually translated into English specifically for this picture book. Bierhorst, the translator, happened across the tale while writing an Aztec-English dictionary based on sources from the 1500s. The artist, Cooney, traveled to Mexico City and the su [...]

    3. This book would have received 5 stars, except for one incorrect statement from Fray Bernardino de Sahagun, who compoed this version of the nativity story. He states "His (Jesus) holiness and mysteriousness are exactly the same as the holiness and mysteriousness of God the father himself. It is God the father who has become a human being and has come to live among us." Actually, it was God the Father who sent God the Son to become incarnate, live among us, and sacrifice himself for our sins.

    4. Sprit Child tells the story of young Native American boy having to make decisions. The tale of this story is originally from early Christian gospels but now is being retold from the view point of a different culture. At the beginning it is not familiar but after a few pages, it is clear that this is the story of the birth of Jesus Christ--just in a different way and from a different perspective. When the Aztec mother gives birth to the baby, traditionally known as Jesus, she calls him Sprit Chil [...]

    5. Aztec text, originally composed by missionary Fray Bernardino de Sahagun with the help of Aztec poets, was translated into English by scholar John Bierhorst and forms the narrative of this interesting Christmas book. Illustrator Barbara Cooney researched small towns and settlements near Mexico City before creating the unusual artwork (which reminded me a bit of Frida Kahlo's work). This cultural picture book gives readers (both children and adults) valuable perspectives on the story of the devil [...]

    6. Interesting take on the birth of Christ, text follows the traditional Biblical story but the illustrations represent Aztec/Mayan Native Americans.

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