Iban Dream

Orphaned as a young boy in the rainforests of Borneo, Bujang is brought up by a family of orangutans, but his adult future has already been decided for him by Sengalang Burong, the Iban warpath god On reaching adulthood, Bujang must leave his ape family and serve the warpath god as a warrior and a headhunter Having survived his first assignment to kill an ill temperedOrphaned as a young boy in the rainforests of Borneo, Bujang is brought up by a family of orangutans, but his adult future has already been decided for him by Sengalang Burong, the Iban warpath god On reaching adulthood, Bujang must leave his ape family and serve the warpath god as a warrior and a headhunter Having survived his first assignment to kill an ill tempered demon in the form of a ferocious wild boar subsequent adventures see Bujang converse with gods, shamans, animal spirits and with the nomadic people of Borneo as he battles evil spirits and demons to preserve the safety of those he holds dear to him But Bujang s greatest test is still to come and he must rally a large headhunting expedition to free his captured wife and those of his fellow villagers In this unique work of fantasy fiction, author Golda Mowe herself an Iban from Borneo uses real beliefs, taboos and terminology of the Iban a longhouse dwelling indigenous group of people from Borneo who, until very recently, were renowned for practising headhunting to weave an epic tale of good versus evil.
Iban Dream Orphaned as a young boy in the rainforests of Borneo Bujang is brought up by a family of orangutans but his adult future has already been decided for him by Sengalang Burong the Iban warpath god On

  • Title: Iban Dream
  • Author: Golda Mowe
  • ISBN: B0083JQBQC
  • Page: 292
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • 1 thought on “Iban Dream”

    1. 3 starsI liked the blurb. I liked it a lot. Hence, the reason I bought it. It was interesting at start but as I read further, I started to feel disappointed. It's the writing style. It didn't bode me well. It lacked of something to make my interest to stay intact. To me, it felt like I was reading a non-fiction although of course I'm well aware this is fiction work.On a good side, it's nice for the author to introduce the Iban cultural to the world through this book. It makes me proud. Despite m [...]

    2. This is it. Not the book that you wanted, but the book you never knew you needed. Rich in Sarawakian folklore and cultural customs, it's a nice divergence from all the swashbuckling, armour wearing, castles and cauldrons fantasy fiction. A must read for any Malaysian, and those interested in the culture of Borneo's famous head hunters.Is it too much to wish that this could be adapted into a series?

    3. I'm really conflicted about this book. On the one hand, it involves the legends and myths of the Iban. In a country where traditional beliefs are repressed in the name of religion, it is an eye opener to see what we were in ages past. The more violent aspect of the Iban culture is presented without judgment and one could almost empathise with their views. Senggalang Burong and Keling and the rest of the deities play a major part in the story, yet are absent enough to preserve their mysticism. On [...]

    4. Picked this up (via Overdrive) because I was interested to see what a local Malaysian fantasy writer would be like.What an interesting read it turned into somewhat of a combo of fantasy, mythology and anthropology. With stories of spirit animals, gods and demons coming to life amidst talking jungle creatures/anthropomorphic beings and then again the skeins of the lifestyle of the longhouse Ibans that is part documentary & part slice of life & part primer to traditional Iban customs and b [...]

    5. At first, I felt that the writing style was difficult and couldn't wrap my head around it that much. But actually, Iban Dream is like good pot: you must wait until you get stoned to feel the beneficial effects. Once you get the buzz, and everything falls in place, the forest will feel as though it's enveloping you. Gods, semi-gods, animals and men: a very interesting depiction of a land I love and was graced to be able to travel to.

    6. Iban Dream is the story of a young Iban boy left to fend for himself after the shaman of his longhouse ordered for him to be cast out because of an evil spirit. Adopted by Tok Anjak, respected leader of the Orang Utan, as a child and claimed by Sengalang Burong, the warpath god, in his adulthood, Bujang Maias must reconcile his peaceful upbringing by the apes with the violence required of him as a warrior and headhunter.In this fanciful tale, Mowe offers a glimpse into the ancient beliefs of the [...]

    7. This review and more on So BookaliciousOne of the things I love the most about being a book blogger is that I get send books from all over the world. It is very interesting to learn about new cultures. This is also the case with Iban Dream. Golda Mowe shares her knowledge of the beliefs and taboos of the Iban people, Borneo’s indigenous people. This book should appeal to fiction and fantasy readers. The book follows the life of Bujang, from him being a boy to a full grown man with a family of [...]

    8. I believe in broadening my horizons when it comes to reading. For me that means giving new writers a chance to steal my heart away from more established writers like J.R.R. Tolkien, Robert Jordan, the Bronte sisters and Agatha Christie to name a few. Malaysian author Golda Mowe's book Iban Dream is a perfect example of what can happen when readers break away from the New York Times' Best Sellers list and instead choose a lesser known author's work! Drawing upon her first hand knowledge of the be [...]

    9. As the promo blurb says - this is the book many have been waiting for taking the spirituality and knowledge of the Malay natives out of the longhouse and onto the world stage. I really enjoyed this and found it equal parts fascinating, informative, and thrilling. As the Iban culture is based on principles quite removed from the modern world it was an insight to a world and culture unknown to me. The fantasy element also allows the narrative to develop in interesting ways and directions. With th [...]

    10. To be honest, I felt a bit disappointed. I guess that's what you get for believing TheStar. The description in this book is refinedly-crude and it doesn't really bode well with my usual preference of a more feminine writing style. Nonetheless, it doesn't defeat the fact that it is indeed a triumph in drawing attention to the vibrancy of the Malaysian indigenous. Bringing life to the oft-neglected part of the Malaysian culture, Iban Dream fell short of being amazing not because of its flaw, but, [...]

    11. I thought this book was a fantastic and interesting look into some of the tribal beliefs of the Iban people. Though it is a work of fiction it still answered some questions I had from my visit to the Kuching Museam. This book was a great read while traveling through Borneo. I devoured it and hunted down the sequel!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *