The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students through Digital Learning

One of the first champions of the positive effects of gaming reveals the dark side of today s digital and social mediaToday s schools are eager to use the latest technology in the classroom, but rather than improving learning, the new e media can just as easily narrow students horizons Education innovator James Paul Gee first documented the educational benefits of gamingOne of the first champions of the positive effects of gaming reveals the dark side of today s digital and social mediaToday s schools are eager to use the latest technology in the classroom, but rather than improving learning, the new e media can just as easily narrow students horizons Education innovator James Paul Gee first documented the educational benefits of gaming a decade ago in his classic What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy Now, with digital and social media at the center of modern life, he issues an important warning that groundbreaking new technologies, far from revolutionizing schooling, can stymie the next generation s ability to resolve deep global challenges The solution and perhaps our children s future lies in what Gee calls synchronized intelligence, a way of organizing people and their digital tools to solve problems, produce knowledge, and allow people to count and contribute Gee explores important strategies and tools for today s parents, educators, and policy makers, including virtual worlds, artificial tutors, and ways to create collective intelligence where everyday people can solve hard problems By harnessing the power of human creativity with interactional and technological sophistication we can finally overcome the limitations of today s failing educational system and solve problems in our high risk global world The Anti Education Era is a powerful and important call to reshape digital learning, engage children in a meaningful educational experience, and bridge inequality.
The Anti Education Era Creating Smarter Students through Digital Learning One of the first champions of the positive effects of gaming reveals the dark side of today s digital and social mediaToday s schools are eager to use the latest technology in the classroom but rathe

  • Title: The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students through Digital Learning
  • Author: James Paul Gee
  • ISBN: 9781137324115
  • Page: 223
  • Format: ebook
  • 1 thought on “The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students through Digital Learning”

    1. “How to be Stupid” and “How to Get Smart Before it’s Too Late” - they sound like titles of tough-love self-help books, but are in reality two halves of a very thoughtful book on what is wrong with ourselves, our education, our “democracy” etc, and how to make it all better (nice and tidy in 215 pages, no less). From one of my favorite scholars I first read in graduate school, James Paul Gee, this holds no panacea for the educational crisis that faces us, yet holds some questions an [...]

    2. We won't find the terms personal learning networks (PLNs) or connected learning anywhere in James Paul Gee's wonderfully stimulating book "The Anti-Education Era." But his plea for greater collaboration, the use of what he calls "affinity spaces," and recognition that the combination of "human + tool" is a winning equation suggests that trainer-teacher-learners (and many others) are on the right track by developing those dynamic combinations of people and resources that help us cope with a world [...]

    3. 371.33 GEE 1984 by George OrwellMy comment: I think book title does not match the content of book, which address all sort of pitfalls which could make us stupid. Part 1: How to be stupid. Part 2: How to get smart before it's too late.Do not quite agree with author's view which too much focus on practice, especially personal practice and experience.e.g p46 Some will say: If you can just read, surely you can understand. You do not need to have had any special experience here or know about nay spe [...]

    4. I chose James Paul Gee's book because I hadn't read anything by him before, although I was familiar with his important influences on the field of video games and learning.Given the subtitle "Creating Smarter Students through Digital Learning," I was expecting a more conventional elaboration on his earlier books on video games and learning. However, in this book Gee waxes more philosophical, speaking on knowledge of learning in the very broad context of our entire culture and society. If you are [...]

    5. For the first two-thirds of this book, I actively disliked it. I did not dislike the ideas, I hated the way they were presented. The ideas about how humans are mentally lazy are not new. However, the way Gee wrote about them made him sound depressingly misanthropic. My other issue was that he, who espouses the benefits of empiricism and is a trained linguist, presented no research to back his original arguments in the how humans are "stupid" section. I would have had a much easier time with this [...]

    6. Didn't finish. I tried forcing myself to read more, but it just made me angry. Although I may agree with Gee's conclusions, and want to read about his ideas, the style of his writing is extremely off-putting. It assumes an absolute agreement with all of his claims, and he employs a flippant style that belies any claims he may state--why should I agree with anything he says when he doesn't mention any evidence, only anecdotes to illustrate his ideas? Of course he includes the obligatory reference [...]

    7. Some interesting thoughts but overall I'm not a fan of his writing style and views. He starts out the book with a throwaway line saying people who believe in astrology are deceiving themselves - not only judgmental (on a topic he probably has little expertise in) but totally unnecessary to his main arguments. The book keeps this judgmental tone throughout.

    8. Meget normativ. Opråb til det amerikanske folk. Måden vi forstår undervisning og viden på skal ændres NU. Til tider lidt for påståelig og lang i spyttet.Interessant info om menneskers måde at bruge viden og redskaber på.Gør brug af meget forskningslitteratur, dog uden at referere direkte. Skrevet i et meget letlæseligt sprog. God referenceliste til sidst i bogen.

    9. I quite enjoyed James Paul Gee's book, especially the many analogies and examples he used to illustrate his points. I agree with his take on institutionsd how difficult it would be to "unfreeze" entrenched methodologies and ways of thinking. It's always a delight to read fresh points of view in a world of increasingly dumbing down by the media and by viral social popularity efforts.

    10. Some excellent points here - preparedness for democratic participation, agency and reflection.There was no research to back up the first part of the book which was disappointing. And I am not as sceptical as to what one can bring spiritually in their virtual school bag.

    11. The language is blunt and the point is reinforced again and again. This straight-forward book critiquing humanity and all of our social pitfalls also offers some saving graces, which makes this book an interesting venture for people who don't mind the bluntness of his, very often repeated, point.

    12. I'd really had high expectations and thought there was more echoing here. Perhaps I'm just too close to those who are doing this work?

    13. So What I remember from this book is that the first half is about how the Internet is making us dumber, and the second half is about how it can save us.

    14. Really great read, but not at all what I expected. More of a socio-political essay. Loved it up till the last chapters.

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