Vibration Cooking or the Travel Notes of a Geechee Girl

Vibration Cooking was first published in 1970, not long after the term soul food gained common use While critics were quick to categorize her as a proponent of soul food, Smart Grosvenor wanted to keep the discussion of her cookbook memoir focused on its message of food as a source of pride and validation of black womanhood and black consciousness raising In 1959, atVibration Cooking was first published in 1970, not long after the term soul food gained common use While critics were quick to categorize her as a proponent of soul food, Smart Grosvenor wanted to keep the discussion of her cookbook memoir focused on its message of food as a source of pride and validation of black womanhood and black consciousness raising In 1959, at the age of nineteen, Smart Grosvenor sailed to Europe, where the bohemians lived and let live Among the cosmopolites of radical Paris, the Gullah girl from the South Carolina low country quickly realized that the most universal lingua franca is a well cooked meal As she recounts a cool cat s nine lives as chanter, dancer, costume designer, and member of the Sun Ra Solar Myth Arkestra, Smart Grosvenor introduces us to a rich cast of characters We meet Estella Smart, Vertamae s grandmother and connoisseur of mountain oysters Uncle Costen, who lived to be 112 and knew how to make Harriet Tubman Ragout and Archie Shepp, responsible for Collard Greens la Shepp, to name a few She also tells us how poundcake got her a marriage proposal she didn t accept and how she perfected omelettes in Paris, enchiladas in New Mexico, biscuits in Mississippi, and feijoida in Brazil When I cook, I never measure or weigh anything, writes Smart Grosvenor I cook by vibration This edition features a foreword by Psyche Williams Forson placing the book in historical context and discussing Smart Grosvenor s approach to food and culture A new preface by the author details how she came to write Vibration Cooking.
Vibration Cooking or the Travel Notes of a Geechee Girl Vibration Cooking was first published in not long after the term soul food gained common use While critics were quick to categorize her as a proponent of soul food Smart Grosvenor wanted to kee

  • Title: Vibration Cooking or the Travel Notes of a Geechee Girl
  • Author: Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 424
  • Format: None
  • 1 thought on “Vibration Cooking or the Travel Notes of a Geechee Girl”

    1. (I had to read this groundbreaking book once I learned that filmmaker Julie Dash is working on a documentary about Vertamae Grosvenor titled “Travel Notes of a Geechee Girl.”)Vibration Cooking or the Travel Notes of a Geechee Girl was first published in 1970 but the edition I read was published in 1992. In the Introduction (from 1991) Dr. Grosvenor (she received an honorary doctorate from the University of New Hampshire) wrote about how publication of the book impacted her career as a “cul [...]

    2. This woman had a helluva life. And her writing is on point! I laughed with her; I got mad when she was mad. I really loved her unapologetic Blackness throughout the book. And her respect for the cultures of others. This book was rich. And a fun, "easy to relate to" read. I have no regrets, except waiting so long to read it. I need to jot down some of these recipes, too!

    3. So sassy and real. Cookbook/memoir that is *so* much more than "soul food." "When I cook, I never measure or weigh anything," she writes. "I cook by vibration."

    4. Verta Mae Grosvenor hails from Fairfax, South Carolina. As an actress, a mother, an NPR commentator, and all-round adventuress, her travels have taken her from the South Carolina Lowcountry to Paris and beyond. Everywhere she has gone, she has been accompanied by memorable dishes, many of which have recipes in this book. Unlike in most cookbooks, the many of the recipes here do not have quantities listed: instead, Verta Mae counsels cooking by vibration. Add the amount of an ingredient that feel [...]

    5. While this book has little in the way of real cooking information, it is a great read simply for the fact that African American women have been given so little attention in any aspect of literature. I bought it for food knowledge, and left knowing more about the socio-economic trials and dealings of a Black woman in the 70's. Good stuff.

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