Mfa: The Novel

John is an alcoholic writer who drinks to keep writing and writes to keep drinking While studying for his MFA at Emerson College, he records his day to day existence in the city of Boston, writes about his experiences in workshops and dive bars, and reads literary biographies Of the seven American born writers awarded the Nobel Prize, five were alcoholics, and he followsJohn is an alcoholic writer who drinks to keep writing and writes to keep drinking While studying for his MFA at Emerson College, he records his day to day existence in the city of Boston, writes about his experiences in workshops and dive bars, and reads literary biographies Of the seven American born writers awarded the Nobel Prize, five were alcoholics, and he follows their staggered footsteps into a cycle of recurring situations, volatile relationships, and similarly disturbing encounters that threatens to push him over the edge He might be gathering a wealth of material for his autobiographical thesis but will he survive to actually complete the program Full of seedy sex scenes, rebellion, dysfunction, dark humor and self destruction, MFA is a defining installment in the gritty genre of transgressive fiction Rapczynski does it again with MFA plunges us into the seedy underbelly this time in the form of a young alcoholic whose drinking, sex life, and ambitions are equally promiscuous In the tradition of Charles Bukowski, Jack Kerouac, and William Burroughs, in MFA the narrator rises above his narrative sharp, witty, sad, and grimily real so we can t help but like and feel for him Read it and weep Elizabeth Inness Brown, author of Burning Marguerite
Mfa The Novel John is an alcoholic writer who drinks to keep writing and writes to keep drinking While studying for his MFA at Emerson College he records his day to day existence in the city of Boston writes abou

  • Title: Mfa: The Novel
  • Author: Jason Rapczynski Jennifer L. Lassen
  • ISBN: 9781479145027
  • Page: 192
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Mfa: The Novel”

    1. When I first began reading this novel, I honestly didn't know how to take it. The wretched excursion into self-created self-abusee intellectualized meaningless of just about everything John, our protagonist, doese uni-dimensionally, soulless characters presented to the reader ad nauseum, all came to mind. It felt like artifice. Like an exercise in minimalism - Miller and Bukowski for the 2000s. And then I realized, that's exactly what it was supposed to be. MFA offers a symbolic commentary on al [...]

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