A Lawless Breed: John Wesley Hardin, Texas Reconstruction, and Violence in the Wild West

John Wesley Hardin His name spread terror in much of Texas in the years following the Civil War as the most wanted fugitive with a 4,000 reward on his head A Texas Ranger wrote that he killed men just to see them kick Hardin began his killing career in the late 1860s and remained a wanted man until his capture in 1877 by Texas Rangers and Florida law officials He certJohn Wesley Hardin His name spread terror in much of Texas in the years following the Civil War as the most wanted fugitive with a 4,000 reward on his head A Texas Ranger wrote that he killed men just to see them kick Hardin began his killing career in the late 1860s and remained a wanted man until his capture in 1877 by Texas Rangers and Florida law officials He certainly killed twenty men some credited him with killing forty or After sixteen years in Huntsville prison he was pardoned by Governor Hogg For a short while he avoided trouble and roamed westward, eventually establishing a home of sorts in wild and woolly El Paso as an attorney He became embroiled in the dark side of that city and eventually lost his final gunfight to an El Paso constable, John Selman Hardin was forty two years old.Besides his reputation as the deadliest man with a six gun, he left an autobiography in which he detailed many of the troubles of his life In A Lawless Breed, Chuck Parsons and Norman Wayne Brown have meticulously examined his claims against available records to determine how much of his life story is true, and how much was only a half truth, or a complete lie As a killer of up to forty men, Hardin obviously had psychological issues, which the authors probe and explain in laymen s terms To Hardin, those three dozen or killings were a result of being forced to defend his life, his honor, or to preserve his freedom against those who would rob or destroy him or his loved ones Was he a combination freedom fighter man killer, or merely a blood lust killer who became a national celebrity This deeply researched biography of Hardin and his friends and family will remain the definitive study for years to come.
A Lawless Breed John Wesley Hardin Texas Reconstruction and Violence in the Wild West John Wesley Hardin His name spread terror in much of Texas in the years following the Civil War as the most wanted fugitive with a reward on his head A Texas Ranger wrote that he killed men just

  • Title: A Lawless Breed: John Wesley Hardin, Texas Reconstruction, and Violence in the Wild West
  • Author: Chuck Parsons Norman Wayne Brown Leon C. Metz
  • ISBN: 9781574415056
  • Page: 152
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “A Lawless Breed: John Wesley Hardin, Texas Reconstruction, and Violence in the Wild West”

    1. A Lawless Breed: John Wesley Hardin, Texas Reconstruction, and Violence in the Wild WestWritten by: Chuck Parsons , Norman Wayne BrownNarrated by: Jim SartorThis book really intrigued me. I knew very little about John Wesley Hardin and boy did this open my eyes. What little I thought I knew was all wrong. He had quite a life! Wow, everytime I read about these characters during the old west and civil war times I am just astounded that any of them lived very long at all the way they acted and beha [...]

    2. This is a detailed biography of one of the Old West's most notorious shootists--John Wesley Hardin. Sometimes accused of killing someone for snoring too loudly (the book raises questions about that), he was a stone killer. How many people did he actually kill? This volume is circumspect about that--noting the allegations of killing but also trying to stick with the actual evidence.One of the strengths of this work is its grounding of Hardin's life in documentation--whether his autobiography (to [...]

    3. A Lawless BreedBy Chuck Parsons and Norman Wayne BrownPublisher: University of North Texas PressPublished In: Denton, TX, USADate: 2013Pgs: 490Summary:John Wesley Hardin. The name was a terror in Texas from the end of the Civil War through 1895. Characterized by a Texas Ranger as being so mean that he would kill people just to see them kick. He spent much of his life with a $4000 reward on his head. On the run from the 1860s through his capture in 1877 by Texas Rangers and law officers from Flor [...]

    4. “This audiobook was given by the author, narrator, or publisher at no cost in exchange for an unbiased review via Audiobook Boom.”A Lawless Breed: John Wesley Hardin, Texas Reconstruction, and Violence in the Wild West by: Chuck Parsons , Norman Wayne BrownA fascinating look back at a notorious name from history. The narration was well doneI loved the enthusiasm showed, especially newspaper headlines.Good job, Jim Sartor!

    5. Very Interesting Read!Extensive research went in to the writing of this book. Although some facts are unrecoverable, Mr. Parsons done an amazing job of compiling what was available. Highly Recommended!

    6. Lots of pictures, well-documented with lots of information. Unfortunately, like most of the books of this time, it reads like a gargantuan newspaper clipping.

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