Flex: The New Playbook for Managing Across Differences

Renowned executive coaches and global leadership strategists offer lessons on the vital skill of Flexing the art of switching leadership styles to effectively lead people who are different from you, allowing managers to successfully manage the multicultural workers of today and tomorrow The workplace around the world is growing increasingly multicultural, female, anRenowned executive coaches and global leadership strategists offer lessons on the vital skill of Flexing the art of switching leadership styles to effectively lead people who are different from you, allowing managers to successfully manage the multicultural workers of today and tomorrow The workplace around the world is growing increasingly multicultural, female, and younger Diversity experts often tell CEOs and managers what NOT to do, and corporate diversity programs have become defensive measures against lawsuits and harassment charges We have lost the ability to build the trust required to achieve great outcomes in our workplaces In order to be successful in this new global business environment, we need to re think the way we lead others.Flex offers a different approach a proactive strategy for managers to navigate and leverage diversity effectively in this new global economy, showing managers how to Understand the Power Gap, the social distance between you and those in the workplace of different cultures, ages, and gender Flex your management style, by stretching how you work and communicate with others, and bridging the gap with effective communication, feedback tools and building healthy teams Multiply the effect, by teaching these skills to others and closing the power gap with clients, customers, and partners to create innovative solutionsCreating flex in a company s management style will impact all aspects of developing the talent you have, attracting future talent and building relationships with customers in this competitive marketplace Now, Flex shows you how.
Flex The New Playbook for Managing Across Differences Renowned executive coaches and global leadership strategists offer lessons on the vital skill of Flexing the art of switching leadership styles to effectively lead people who are different from you a

  • Title: Flex: The New Playbook for Managing Across Differences
  • Author: Jane Hyun Audrey Lee
  • ISBN: 9780062248527
  • Page: 360
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Flex: The New Playbook for Managing Across Differences”

    1. I received a free copy of the electronic ARC from Edelweiss.Three stars is a bit of a stretch for this one, but I gave it a little extra bump because I am really not the target audience. This would be a valuable book for managers who deal with a diverse workforce, particularly in the corporate world. As a suburban librarian who currently works with 97% white women (not something we should be proud of, but there it is), I valued this book for the lessons I hope I will remember down the line, when [...]

    2. Flex: The New Playbook for Managing Across Differences by Jane Hyun and Audrey Lee was chosen by Soundview Executive Book Summaries as one of the Top 30 Business Books of 2014E SOUNDVIEW REVIEW:While holding firm is traditionally viewed as a strength in leadership, changing times and the speed with which those changes occur calls for a different model. In Flex: The New Playbook for Managing Across Differences, executive coaches Jane Hyun and Audrey S. Lee sweep away the broken pieces of the trad [...]

    3. A friend of mine and I have recently taken on more leadership roles in our careers, so we thought we would give this book a try. However, this is not a book geared towards anyone in the education field. There is one teacher mentioned, Rafe Esquith, who is already highly publicized, and it seemed out of place. This is definitely more for people who work in places where CEOs are involved. Still, there was some food for thought.I liked the chapter on Culture and Communication: Flexing Across Styles [...]

    4. I received this book free through the First Reads program. It came at a time when I was helping one of our directors manage older, more experienced employees, so it was great timing. I love that it was written by two women who address issues in narrowing the "power gap" in organizations by looking at the total picture. They take into account not only experience differences, but culture, gender, race, and generation gaps, and how these experience bases can affect communication, trust, interpreta [...]

    5. While the premise of the book is certainly timely and important (managing across power gaps/differences between genders, generations, and cultures) I really disliked this book-- it was a fluffy HR-ish read that didn't present anything new and was generally not a value-add. At all. So many lame hypothetical stories, overly "familiar"/informal language, overly politically correct switching between gendered pronouns constantly in a dumb distracting way ugh. I had to read it for work or would have p [...]

    6. I received an ARC through a contest and was on a Lean In/women & minorities in business/The Partner Track kick. I was pleasantly surprised that the book was not only about managing "down" but also about managing "up." Given that I'm not a manager, nor do I usually read this genre, I appreciated the anecdotes and hope that I'll be able to translate some of the messages into my work, especially if I ever manage someone other than an intern!

    7. Maybe really 3.5 stars.Another good business book that probably could have been summarized in a much smaller package. "People are all different and today's workforce is used to be treated like individuals." So do that.If you need more background as to why that's true, it's all there, but felt a little bloated. Worth at least a casual read.

    8. A must read for anyone who manages a diverse work force, particularly those working with individuals from various generations or cultures. Great tips and practical ideas for improving how you work and handle those different from you.

    9. Once they got past a few key points and good illustrative anecdotes, the whole thing got repetitious.

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