Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence

Since the 1970s, a key goal of lesbian and gay activists has been protection against street violence, especially in gay neighborhoods During the same time, policymakers and private developers have declared the containment of urban violence to be a top priority In this important book, Christina B Hanhardt examines how LGBT calls for safe space have been shaped by broadSince the 1970s, a key goal of lesbian and gay activists has been protection against street violence, especially in gay neighborhoods During the same time, policymakers and private developers have declared the containment of urban violence to be a top priority In this important book, Christina B Hanhardt examines how LGBT calls for safe space have been shaped by broader public safety initiatives that have sought solutions in policing and privatization and have had devastating effects along race and class lines.Drawing on extensive archival and ethnographic research in New York City and San Francisco, Hanhardt traces the entwined histories of LGBT activism, urban development, and U.S policy in relation to poverty and crime over the past fifty years She highlights the formation of a mainstream LGBT movement, as well as the very different trajectories followed by radical LGBT and queer grassroots organizations Placing LGBT activism in the context of shifting liberal and neoliberal policies, Safe Space is a groundbreaking exploration of the contradictory legacies of the LGBT struggle for safety in the city.
Safe Space Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence Since the s a key goal of lesbian and gay activists has been protection against street violence especially in gay neighborhoods During the same time policymakers and private developers have dec

  • Title: Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence
  • Author: Christina B. Hanhardt
  • ISBN: 9780822354703
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence”

    1. i wanted to like this book more than i did? like, there are some *really* good parts to this and i think this book is worth reading (5 stars on *you should read this*, 3 stars on *this is fun to read*). i think my biggest problem comes from the sheer volume of work that Hanhardt is attempting to address (the history of discourses of safety & space in "queer" history) and thus some parts feel a little sketchy (despite the mentions of transwomen being targeted in the "cleanup" of the piers ver [...]

    2. This book provides a truly intersectional analysis of neighborhood political organizing around violence and how it connects to the protection of private property and gentrification. It's a solid, clearly argued and very well documented book that covers a tremendous amount of historical and territorial ground in a relatively brief narrative. Consider this, it covers the LGBT organizing in neighborhoods from the 1960s-present, including the Castro, the Central City and Tenderloin in San Francisco [...]

    3. Hanhardt argued that anti-violence neighborhood organizing by white LGBT activists, using politics of respectability to gain visibility, helped push gentrification and backlash by queer POC. She looks to gay neighborhoods of Castro, Center City and Tenderloin in San Francisco, and West Village, Piers, and Greenwich Village in NYC, in the years proceeding Stonewall and the decades since, while concentrating on the safe street patrols, antiviolence programs and access to private/public money, and [...]

    4. I was very excited to discover this book since I am an officer for Seattle's Q-Patrol revival and I've found that there are surprisingly few histories of early gay/queer safety patrols. Therefore, even though only about a third of this book is about that in particular I'll be recommending it to everyone in the group.It's primarily useful as presentation of why, while earlier patrols can be a good inspiration, we need to think of ourselves as a definite rupture with them in practice. Since libera [...]

    5. Solid scholarship with deeply perceptive insights. Hanhardt deftly entangles strands (often contradicting) of queer history, urban studies, and economic change. Students in these areas will find her approach instructive. That said, the book was less compelling than I had hoped, perhaps because I read it after I finished some personality-driven narrative histories. Hanhardt emphasizes the role of movements, not individuals, and while this approach give rewarding insights and combats unhelpful "gr [...]

    6. Dense, historical, well-researched account of the various organizations and groups from the early 60's though the present which sought to guarantee safe spaces for GLBT individuals and neighborhoods, and the difficulties of finding that difficult road along class and race lines.

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