After Auschwitz

Eva was arrested by the Nazis on her fifteenth birthday and sent to Auschwitz Her survival depended on endless strokes of luck, her own determination and the love and protection of her mother Fritzi, who was deported with her.When Auschwitz was liberated, Eva and Fritzi began the long journey home They searched desperately for Eva s father and brother, from whom they hadEva was arrested by the Nazis on her fifteenth birthday and sent to Auschwitz Her survival depended on endless strokes of luck, her own determination and the love and protection of her mother Fritzi, who was deported with her.When Auschwitz was liberated, Eva and Fritzi began the long journey home They searched desperately for Eva s father and brother, from whom they had been separated The news came some months later Tragically, both men had been killed.Before the war, in Amsterdam, Eva had become friendly with a young girl called Anne Frank Though their fates were very different, Eva s life was set to be entwined with her friend s for ever , after her mother Fritzi married Anne s father Otto Frank in 1953.This is a searingly honest account of how an ordinary person survived the Holocaust Eva s memories and descriptions are heartbreakingly clear, her account brings the horror as close as it can possibly be.But this is also an exploration of what happened next, of Eva s struggle to live with herself after the war and to continue the work of her step father Otto, ensuring that the legacy of Anne Frank is never forgotten.
After Auschwitz Eva was arrested by the Nazis on her fifteenth birthday and sent to Auschwitz Her survival depended on endless strokes of luck her own determination and the love and protection of her mother Fritzi

  • Title: After Auschwitz
  • Author: Eva Schloss
  • ISBN: 9781444760682
  • Page: 416
  • Format: Hardcover
  • After Auschwitz After Auschwitz is a Post Holocaust documentary that follows six extraordinary women, capturing what it means to move from tragedy and trauma towards life. After Auschwitz A story of heartbreak and survival by the After Auschwitz A story of heartbreak and survival by the stepsister of Anne Frank Eva Schloss on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Eva was arrested by the Nazis on her fifteenth birthday and sent to Auschwitz Her survival depended on endless strokes of luck Auschwitz and After Second Edition Written by a member of the French resistance who became an important literary figure in postwar France, this moving memoir of life and death in Auschwitz and the postwar experiences of women survivors has become a key text for Holocaust studies classes. Auschwitz concentration camp History Background The ideology of Nazism brought together elements of antisemitism, racial hygiene, and eugenics, and combined them with pan Germanism and territorial expansionism with the goal of obtaining Lebensraum living space for the Germanic people Immediately after the Nazi seizure of power in Germany, acts of violence perpetrated against Jews became ubiquitous. Faith in God and Man After Auschwitz Theological Faith in God and Man after Auschwitz this topic was given to me It would provoke thought at any time for philosophers about Man, for theologians about God at least if theirs is the God of Abraham. But when Yad Vashem formulated the topic, no one could have guessed our apocalyptic situation, in Israel, the Territories, the Middle East, Europe, America, the United Nations. Auschwitz, Nazi death camp Auschwitz Birkenau became the killing centre where the largest numbers of European Jews were killed during the Holocaust.After an experimental gassing there in September of malnourished and ill prisoners, mass murder became a daily routine. Auschwitz death camps The first prisoners to be sent to Auschwitz, a group of Polish political prisoners including some Jews , arrived in Auschwitz from Tarnow on June .The first large group sent to Auschwitz from outside Poland was a transport of Czechs. Josef Mengele, Angel of Death The Holocaust Nazi persecution, arrests, and deportations were directed against all members of Jewish families, as well as many Gypsy families, without concern for age. Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp Complex data and After the occupation of Poland by the Third Reich, the name of the city of Oswiecim was changed to Auschwitz by the Germans, and became the name of the camp as well. The Auschwitz Children The Holocaust Children The number of children killed by Hitler and his Nazis is not fathomable and full statistics for the tragic fate of the children will never be known Estimates range as high as . million murdered children You find a few of them here but there are no happy endings.

    1 thought on “After Auschwitz”

    1. It's all about six degrees both for the author and me. I had a small connection with Eva Schloss's mother. There used to be an elegant cafe in Swiss Cottage (view spoiler)[in London, near the Finchley Road Waitrose where I did my shopping. Always need a coffee after enduring the supermarket experience. (hide spoiler)] where the was a dinner-jacketed pianist tinkling the keys of a grand piano with pre-war dance music every afternoon. Most of the customers were very old, well-dressed ladies with p [...]

    2. "A few months ago I finished speaking, and looked down at a class of schoolchildren. A Somali girl with dark eyes hesitantly put her hand up and asked, 'Do you think it will happen again?' I can't answer that, but maybe you can. Will it? I hope not."In this short and direct conclusion, Eva Schloss sums up her life story with a single wish, never again. Schloss' book is gritty and painful to read, like any Holocaust memoir must be. However, this hope permeates through the darkness. Her hope for a [...]

    3. A powerful, direct book. I believe the Author was definitely inlfuenced by her time in Holland, becauseher style is in a way "very dutch" - straightforward, candid, focusing on a true account and sharing even emption in a streamlined wayAnyway, one of the aspects of the book that I most loved was the fact tat it satrted BEFORE the camps and it finnished around 2012. The gift of this is twofold: on the one hand, it brings a lot of color into the story, not just the helpless grey of stories comple [...]

    4. In copertina possiamo leggere che "questo libro inizia dove finisce il Diario di Anna Frank" ed è proprio così, visto che questo lavoro, in pratica, non è altro che una impressionante documentazione "in presa diretta" degli orrori nazisti da parte di Eva Schloss, una sopravvissuta al campo di concentramento di Auschwitz e coetanea della più famosa Anna. Altro legame che unisce le due ragazzine è il fatto che, una volta scampati e tornati da Auschwitz, il padre di Anna sposa la madre di Eva. [...]

    5. "After Auschwitz" is a very moving autobiography of Eva Schloss.While everyone is aware of Anne Frank because of her diary and her museum, not many know about Eva. Anne's father lost her wife and her daughters. He later married Eva's mother who had lost her husband and her son in the holocaust.Eva survived after spending time at the Auschwitz concentration camp. This is her story before and after the horrific days. As expected from any survivor's tale, it is extremely moving and at times painful [...]

    6. I could not even try to give this a justified review. Eva's 15th birthday she was captured by the Nazi's and taken to Auschwitz. There she endured so many things unimaginable. After liberation, her mother married Otto Frank, Anne Franks father, and we hear Eva tell what it was like before, during, & after Auschwitz. Words cannot describe. That is all.

    7. "Mamã, isto é o fim do mundo?"Eva Schloss conta-nos a história da sua vida. Uma história sobre coragem, sobrevivência e esperança, apesar de todos os acontecimentos exteriores e independentes do controlo individual. Do conforto da sua acolhedora casa de família, movida pela subida ao poder de Hitler, Eva viaja com a sua família até que têm de se dividir. Com a mãe vive numa pensão e mais tarde numa casa de holandeses que ajudavam judeus até serem apanhadas e serem enviadas para o ca [...]

    8. Si hubiera que elegir una palabra para describir este libro seria "revelador" he leído muchas cosas sobre el holocausto, pero todas iban mas o menos al mismo punto, la historia de algún superviviente de campo de concentración, pero este libro es como un respiro de tanta amargura y tanto dolor , es una espiral de los sinsentidos que vivieron los que salieron "vivos" a duras penas, que pasa después, como vives con la culpa de haber sobrevivido, como lo hiciste? Que suerte te acompaño Y sobre [...]

    9. Muito bom! Apesar de ser manifestamente o meu tipo de livro preferido (história verídica num momento histórico importante) penso que toda a gente irá gostar.Gostei especialmente de saber mais detalhadamente o desenrolar da 2ª Guerra Mundial.Recomendo!!!

    10. Já li diversos livros sobre o Holocausto, mas este será, certamente, um dos que mais me cativou. A forma como a autora descreve os acontecimentos - vividos por uma adolescente que lutou pela sua sobrevivência num dos períodos mais tristes da história da humanidade - tem algo que nos envolve na narrativa e nos faz compreender o que foi aquele período.

    11. The name of the book is deceptive as the first half describes the lives of the Schloss family before and during World War II. The story is told from the point of view of Eva, who survives the holocaust, together with her mother, Fritzi. Her brother and father do not.Eva’s mother is remarried after the war - to Otto - the father of Anne Frank, who sadly perished at this time and whose famous diary explains her life during the extermination of millions of Jews under Hitler’s reign.The second h [...]

    12. Eva's story of how she and her mother survived Auschwitz and her life after Auschwitz. Eva was born in Austria and had to move after the German Nazi's came in to the country. Eventually ending up in Amsterdam, the family became brief acquaintance of the Frank family, living in Amsterdam as well, even knowing Anne for a little while. After the Holocaust Eva and her mother returned to Amsterdam, her father and brother having passed. We see her life and her thoughts after this time, and how Otto Fr [...]

    13. Very interesting and well-written story. Surprisingly even though I wanted to keep reading it didn't move me as much as I thought it would. perhaps if it had been written more from the heart it would have. It is in the voice of someone standing back from the events and maybe that is because Eva has never really let herself fully feel what happened to her or let others see her pain. Well worth a read.

    14. A compelling autobiography of Eva Schloss and her survival after being in a concentration camp, this book helped understanding of life during German occupation and how prisoners coped in Auschwitz. It was also interesting to read about her life after the camps were liberated, since so many prisoners hadn't been lucky enough to survive.

    15. What an engaging book of survival and courage. Thank you Eva Schloss for sharing your story so the world can remember the value of kindness, freedom and independence.

    16. This book tells a haunting story. I’m sure there are others out there, but I have never read a survivor’s story before. I had just finished her first book, Eva’s Story, immediately before reading this one, so the first half of the book was sort of repetitive, as she goes over her experience leading up do and during the Holocaust again. But starting halfway through the book there is new material and it is really interesting to hear a survivor’s perspective on the aftermath as well as life [...]

    17. "There can be no justice if it doesn't happen in THIS world"Boy, how true is that.The fact I can't get desensitized to these holocaust stories and always come for more is a bad thing in a good kind of way. I suffer all along every time, but some things must not be forgotten.Good part of this book is about aftermath of holocaust, mental, social, and physical state of survivors, which is something that definitely received less publicity than actual events.

    18. Both sad and encouraging. I discovered this book at the Auschwitz-Birkenau bookstore in Poland. Eva's story and her tie to Anne Frank weave a personal connection to a story we know so well and one we did not. The juxtaposition of one girl living and one girl dying provides such a stark reminder of the toll WWII's atrocities took in the Jewish communities. We should all remember and choose compassion.

    19. Los invito a ver mi reseña en: mividamislibrosyuncafe/desUn período en la historia oscuro, lleno de horrores, donde queda expuesta la crueldad humana, la indiferencia, el odio, pero también la supervivencia y las ganas de vivir de quienes en algún momento fueron olvidados como seres humanos.La historia que nos narra Eva Schloss en su libro es justo eso: la historia de la persona, de quién era Eva antes de la aparición de los Nazis y la Gestapo en su vida y de en quién se convirtió despu [...]

    20. Excellent Book, Disregard the Bad Reviews, you need to read what happens before and during Auchwitz to understand what happens After.

    21. Uno puede leer varios libros y películas sobre sobrevivientes del Holocausto y pensar que es increíble la cantidad de judíos, gitanos y razas minorías tuvieron que sufrir en 1940 los campos de concentración. Eva Schloss hace además una anotación más precisa: El Holocausto ocurrió por un Hitler, pero también porque la gente dejó que pasara. Eva Schloss nos hace varias veces la pregunta que le han hecho a ella: Sirve para algo escribir y hablar y presentarse y contar la historia? Mucha [...]

    22. Fascinating, horrifying, emotional, moving and honest account of one lady's quest for survival. We journey with her, from her childhood in the dangerous build up to World War II, to her teens first in hiding, then capture and incarceration in the most unimaginable place - Auschwitz - and finally to how she made a life for herself afterwards. I felt the book glossed over the Auschwitz period slightly (clue is in the title I guess), as I read in I discovered that was because she had previously wri [...]

    23. Eva's remarkable story starts with a lovely life in Vienna,to persecution from the Nazis,fleeing to Amsterdam,going in to hiding ,being betrayed and ending up in a cattle wagon to Aushcwitz.Her father and brother forced to the men's camp and Eva and her mother to the women's.Their hair shaved,possessions taken from them,starved and forced to stand outside for hours in roll call,all for just being Jewish.Their time in Auschwitz is horrific and Eva tells of one moment when working in Canada,going [...]

    24. In its own quiet way this book is profoundly moving and sensational. Eva's story - from her idyllic childhood in Vienna is overlain with the subtle and evil atmosphere of the coming German Anschluss and before you know it the family are being displaced as refugees to Belgium and then Holland. In Amsterdam you see the humanity of some and the evil of others as Jews are either hidden and protected or turned over to the Nazis. Unfortunately Eva's family are betrayed and they are sent to Auschwitz. [...]

    25. "After Auschwitz" is the sequal to "Eva's Story" and charts the life and experiences of Holocaust survivor Eva Schloss after her liberation from Auschwitz concentration camp. Eva charts not only the loss of her father and brother but also her day to day struggles with anxiety and her battle to lead a normal life in spite of all the suffering that she has endured at the hands of the Nazi regime.As with anything that deals with the Holocaust, this is a deeply moving and often difficult read. Eva's [...]

    26. I saw this book in a local bookstore in my downtown area and expressed to my friend how I wanted to read it, and how interesting it looked, etc. What I didn't expect was that she would buy it for me for my birthday! So I was quite pleased and overwhelmed when I received it.As on the book itself, it was an insight on what life was like for people after the war, and what I found especially interesting was how we get a small glimpse into how Otto Frank was after the war. However, I especially liked [...]

    27. Eva Schlosss tells us about growing up Jewish in Vienna, and being made a refugee first in France, and then in Holland, before being betrayed and then arrested by the Nazis on her fifteenth birthday. Tortured and then thrown in a cattle car, the family were sent to Auschwitz. Eva had been a chilhood friend of Anne Frank in Amersterdam, and made contact with her father in the camp and after they were released.Surviving with her mothter, Eva makes a new life for herself in London, where she meets [...]

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