Ramadan Sky

A contemporary twist on a classic story of forbidden love, set in Jakarta, capital city of Indonesia.When Vic accepts a teaching position in Jakarta, she has already been working and travelling in Asia for many years she thinks she knows what to expect However, before long she becomes troubled by the casual coexistence of vast wealth and woeful poverty, and by the starkA contemporary twist on a classic story of forbidden love, set in Jakarta, capital city of Indonesia.When Vic accepts a teaching position in Jakarta, she has already been working and travelling in Asia for many years she thinks she knows what to expect However, before long she becomes troubled by the casual coexistence of vast wealth and woeful poverty, and by the stark differences in freedom and power between the men and the women It also becomes apparent that there will be no support or companionship from her fellow Westerners and colleagues.Fajar has lived in Jakarta all his life He gets by, loaning money from friends and family, spending his nights racing, and his days working on the roads as an ojek driver When he impresses a customer with his understanding of English, he sees an opportunity He dedicates himself to being the woman s driver taking her to and from work, running her errands He thinks he s won big.Neither Fajar nor Vic expect to find friendship and solace in their strange arrangement But, before long, they will step outside the s of their cultures together, crossing a boundary that will shake both of their lives
Ramadan Sky A contemporary twist on a classic story of forbidden love set in Jakarta capital city of Indonesia When Vic accepts a teaching position in Jakarta she has already been working and travelling in Asi

  • Title: Ramadan Sky
  • Author: Nichola Hunter
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 235
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • 1 thought on “Ramadan Sky”

    1. Ramadan Sky by Nichola Hunter BLURB:A contemporary twist on a classic story of forbidden love, set in Jakarta, capital city of Indonesia.When Vic accepts a teaching position in Jakarta, she has already been working and travelling in Asia for many years; she thinks she knows what to expect. However, before long she becomes troubled by the casual coexistence of vast wealth and woeful poverty, and by the stark differences in freedom and power between the men and the women. It also becomes apparent [...]

    2. A somewhat unusual story, Ramadan Sky presents the uneasy relationship between Vic, a 40 year old Australian woman arriving in Jakarta to teach English as a Second Languague; Fajar, the young motorbike driver who ferries her around the city and becomes her lover; and Aryanti, Faraj's former fiance, who still loves him. In an impoverished city of impossible pollution, religious barriers, poverty and futility, with islands of extreme wealth, Vic's situation seems almost unreal. In fact for a part [...]

    3. Ramadan Sky tells the story of a brief and inevitably ill-fated cross-cultural love triangle set in Jakarta. Against the city's backdrop of poverty and corruption, the story unfolds over most of a year as Vic, an Australian English teacher, falls for her much younger and hot-tempered ojek driver, Fajar. He has an on-again, off-again engagement to a girl in his neighborhood, Aryanti, the kind of good Muslim girl he can marry, but will never quite love.The novel makes graceful use of three (or rea [...]

    4. Ramadan Sky by Nichola HunterI’ve just read this book that my wife reviewed for netgalley. My wife and daughter are intellectuals. They review books for their literary merits and tend to be analytical in their reviews; whereas I, am an ordinary bloke, who decides whether he likes a book or not by gut reaction. This novella I did not like; it was bitter, racist and contemptuous of the Indonesian society depicted. I’ve never been to Indonesia, and know nothing about it, but suspect that it is [...]

    5. **Thank you Netgalley and Harper Collins for providing this in exchange for an honest review**Hunter has a gift for realistic writing characters. People are never 100% good or bad, and she was true to that. The low rating is because while the writing was wonderful, I didn't care for the story or the characters so much. Just because characters are realistic, doesn't mean they're actually likable. You have a grown woman who taunts a teenage girl. The teenager has stalkerish tendencies. And Fajar i [...]

    6. Jakarta, the setting for this novella, is depicted as a bleak but strangely appealing place. As a rose can grow from the side of a brick building, beauty will assert itself. The sights and sounds of Jakarta, the ugly as well as the beautiful, are vividly conveyed, with extraordinary poetic sensibility.The lives of the three main characters through whose points of view the story is told, are also bleak. Vic is a lonely, going-on-forty Australian woman who arrives in Jakarta to teach, and is depre [...]

    7. This is art.Yes -this is mesmerizing- and in a wonderful way. Reading the first chapter, I was transported to Jakarta, which is foreign to me - but I was there.I felt myself b r e a t h e while reading - it felt like sitting i n a mellow river, filled with smells from the landscape around. You have an uncanny talent for descriptions that burst with L I F E . This is art."---they watched me together with 4 eyes and many claws waiting to pounce."And:"The beginning of change is a small laneway that [...]

    8. I received the e-Arc copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest reviewWhat could I say about this novella, besides the almost perfect details of all of the familiar things that Nicola Hunter had described about my country (or the capital city, actually)?It is a sunny day, but nothing shimmers or sparkles.There is one particular woman I pass every day on the way to my office. She sits on the concrete in the hot, damp weather with faraway expression of cattle. A filthy baby lies on a square of [...]

    9. I have very mixed feelings about Ramadan Sky. Although I adore the realistic (and heartbreaking) portrayal of relationships and society, I found most of the characters intolerable and not a good representation of Indonesia. The themes mentioned were evident in many countries, and are still relevant in modern society. Firstly, the reason I kept going with this novel was the gorgeous writing. Concise sentences, blunt commentary and sometimes gritty perspective of what it’s like to be a “differ [...]

    10. a unique and fascinating readA compelling look into one disaffected Australian woman's journey to modern day Jakarta as an ESL teacher.Surrounded by peoples of different values and culture, and weird expats who seem like runaways from their own culture, which they now would have difficulty returning to, Victoria's story is told in colourful prose with a delicate turn of phrase. One can feel the heat rising from the pavements of Jakarta and smell the heavy mix of spices and motorbike fumes.Undern [...]

    11. It's a while since I read the beginning of Ramadan Sky on the Authonomy site and became immediately captivated by the youngster suffering patiently with an abscess. The book has undergone revisions and now begins with a prologue which tells the end of the story. Normally I find prologue a mistake but not this one. It sums up exactly how the narrator feels, how any of her readers would feel for her at the end of this three-way story. I call it that because there are three main characters but one [...]

    12. This is an exquisite portrayal of an unusual love triangle, set against the backdrop of impoverished Jakarta where the poor live in an endless relationship of debt with their neighbours, cloying judgement of their adherence to tradition, and futile future. Into this world comes a white, middle-class teacher - somewhat jaded, somewhat lonely - seemingly free and wealthy and yet, in her own way, also tied to the mores and expectations of her peers. When she meets the young Indonesian man hired to [...]

    13. The biggest quality of this book is that it seems so real. The streets and way of life of Indonesia are depicted in a way that you feel that you are there - not romanticised at all, but shown as they are.The white teacher of nearly forty becomes involved with a young man, Indonesian, Muslim, cocky, happy to accept money. Victoria (Vic) enjoys the sex, and likes to help him get ahead. Fajar makes the most of it.I took a while to get into this book - I think it was a mistake to start with Fajar's [...]

    14. 3.5A different twist on the old tale of a young man performing the duties of gigolo for an older woman for financial gain and, in this case, a feeling of worth. Our older woman, Vic, is only in her 30's, but as a white woman with few possibilities for romance in Indonesia she embraces this affair with gusto and finds herself falling in love.Fajar, our gigolo, is torn between the way he feels when he is with Vic, and his own deep-rooted beliefs and traditions. I found myself wanting more from the [...]

    15. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for providing an ARC of this novella. This is the story of a love triangle involving a near 40 year old Australian English teacher, a young 20 year old Indonesian taxi driver, and a young Indonesian woman who is interested in the taxi driver. The love affair takes place at the English teacher's home after she employs the taxi driver to ferry her around. She is wealthy by Indonesian standards and pays to help set up a small business and for holidays. The y [...]

    16. An Indonesian soap opera is the best way to describe this novella. Ramadan Sky captures a tumultuous relationship between a white, foreign (and also much older) woman and a native, Islamic (and much younger) man. I've not read many novellas. However, this one fits the "rules" well and Hunter has done a good job of keeping you interested in their lives. The story also brings to light the injustice and disparity of living conditions many individuals in third world countries experience. The setting [...]

    17. Having been an English teacher in Indonesia (though not Jakarta), this was an interesting book to read. I loved how real the Indonesian characters felt, but I actually had trouble relating to the white female English teacher- go figure. She seems like the kind of expat I actually try to avoid which may be intentional by the author since she didn't have any friends. I think the ending could have been a bit stronger, but overall the writing was good. And I'm still not sure what the title has to do [...]

    18. Really good novella about an English teacher in Jakarta and and her Indonesian driver. Having taught English in another country it had some spot on insights into being an ex-pat. The dynamics of the relationship between the characters is wonderful and rings true. Wonderful novella you can read in a day.

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