The History of England, from the Accession of James II - Volume 1

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.
The History of England from the Accession of James II Volume This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery

  • Title: The History of England, from the Accession of James II - Volume 1
  • Author: Thomas Babington Macaulay
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 330
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • 1 thought on “The History of England, from the Accession of James II - Volume 1”

    1. The 20th century wasn't very kind to The History of England's reputation as a work of history. I don't know the material well enough to speak to these criticisms, but I suppose there is a lot of substance behind them. Certainly Macaulay shows his biases and prejudices from time to time, probably enough to cause the modern reader to question the reliability of his narrative. But at the same time, who cares. Because whatever more modern and evenhanded historians may have over him, very few of them [...]

    2. The rare combination between a literary masterpiece and a history book, and absolutely essential to understanding the development of civil rights in America. Insightful, powerful, gripping -- one of my favorite history books I've ever read. Going to read the rest of the series.

    3. One of my greatest literary regrets is that Macaulay didn't live long enough to complete this masterpiece. It is a work of compelling prose style, quite a match for Gibbon's "Decline and Fall"; amd in addition to conveying the vast sweep of the period with which it deals, it is constantly arresting in terms of Macaulay's ability to present the colourful details that bring English life and society into a preternaturally sharp focus. Is there a downside to this classic? Frankly, no. Some modern re [...]

    4. The two most interesting parts of this book include:1). The co-ed monarchy of William and Mary who mandated everyone to take an oath to the crown. Some clergy refused. Hopefully, these clergies went to heaven.2). William, as the daring, handsome and young usurper. Leading the cavalry! Oh, my!

    5. While a arduous reading at times, the whole tale is mesmerizing by the quality of the details and the events of a often forgotten era.

    6. Halfway through this book I wondered how I would explain to anyone why I was reading it. The first answer is, this interests me for some weird reason. The second reason is what attracts me to history. Looking into history gives you the long view for how we got here. It explains the influences that, for better or worse, have converged to create exactly now. Lastly, You can also see that's what's new is actually old, or merely a variation of something that went on before.For instance, a lot of pat [...]

    7. Best History Book Ever Written!If you are interested in historical romance at all, especially set in the years 1685 to 1700, you should buy this book. Macauley turns all of England's most important era into one big epic adventure. First he shows the cruel, decadent, fanatical James II, scheming to destroy England forever by bringing back absolute monarchy, Catholicism, and torture. Then he shows the heroic Prince William of Orange (and his beautiful English wife Mary) arriving just in time to sa [...]

    8. The writing is fantastic. It may be of doubtful utility as a work of history; but I'm fairly ignorant about the time period, and this seems as good a place as any to start. I just hope I have the fortitude to stick with this title until the end.

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