Garden of the Sun: A History of the San Joaquin Valley: 1772�1939

This comprehensive history of the San Joaquin Valley begins with a study of the indigenous Native American tribes of the area and their interactions with one another It then explores the occupation by the Spanish, the trapping industry, the arrival of settlers from the eastern United States, and the formation of expansive cattle ranches The development of agriculture andThis comprehensive history of the San Joaquin Valley begins with a study of the indigenous Native American tribes of the area and their interactions with one another It then explores the occupation by the Spanish, the trapping industry, the arrival of settlers from the eastern United States, and the formation of expansive cattle ranches The development of agriculture and irrigation and the subsequent battles over land and water rights are addressed Also discussed is the grand era of the railroad, which would forever change the valley, bringing light industry and modern agricultural practices.
Garden of the Sun A History of the San Joaquin Valley This comprehensive history of the San Joaquin Valley begins with a study of the indigenous Native American tribes of the area and their interactions with one another It then explores the occupation by

  • Title: Garden of the Sun: A History of the San Joaquin Valley: 1772�1939
  • Author: Wallace Smith
  • ISBN: 9780941936774
  • Page: 197
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Garden of the Sun: A History of the San Joaquin Valley: 1772�1939”

    1. This expansive text on the history of my home region was first published in 1939. It still remains the most comprehensive resource of the early history of the San Joaquin Valley of California and is almost 800 pages long. I consider myself pretty well read on the region, but this offered constant revelations and fascinating details. The details do become a problem later on in the book, where Wallace goes on and on in almost phone book-like tedium about mundane things such as the cities were loca [...]

    2. This book is not 600 pages. Not counting appendices, it's 746 pages. With appendices, it's 762 pages.I found this book fascinating and informative. It takes you back to the indigenous peoples, the Yokut Indians and other tribes; the Spanish influence; it reveals how many towns and cities in the San Joaquin Valley were settled and acquired their names; that the Wild West was alive and well in the valley, including the presence of the Dalton brothers.I gave it four stars because the later chapters [...]

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