The Pointblank Directive: Three Generals and the Untold Story of the Daring Plan that Saved D-Day

Where was the Luftwaffe on D Day Historians have debated that question for six decades, but in 2010 a formerly classified World War II D Day history was restored, and in it were a new set of answers Pointblank is the result of extensive new research using that newly restored history to create a richly textured portrait of air power and leadership, and perhaps the last unWhere was the Luftwaffe on D Day Historians have debated that question for six decades, but in 2010 a formerly classified World War II D Day history was restored, and in it were a new set of answers Pointblank is the result of extensive new research using that newly restored history to create a richly textured portrait of air power and leadership, and perhaps the last untold story of D Day Three uniquely talented men and why, on the single most important day to the survival of the Third Reich, the German Air Force was unable to mount a single effective combat mission against the invasion forces.After a year of unremarkable bombing against Germany aircraft industry, and with just five months to go until D Day, General Henry H Hap Arnold, commander of the United States Army Air Forces placed his lifelong friend General Carl A Tooey Spaatz in command of the strategic bombing forces in Europe and gave his prot g , General James Jimmy Doolittle command of the Eighth Air Force in England For these fellow aviation pioneers and air war strategists, he had but one set of orders Sweep the skies clean of the Luftwaffe by June 1944 Spaatz and Doolittle couldn t do that, but they could do what Arnold really wanted Clear the skies sufficiently to gain air superiority over the D Day beaches The plan was called Pointblank In Pointblank, L Douglass Keeney carefully reconstructs the events in the air war that led up to D Day while painting an in depth portrait of the lives and times of these aviation pioneers.
The Pointblank Directive Three Generals and the Untold Story of the Daring Plan that Saved D Day Where was the Luftwaffe on D Day Historians have debated that question for six decades but in a formerly classified World War II D Day history was restored and in it were a new set of answers P

  • Title: The Pointblank Directive: Three Generals and the Untold Story of the Daring Plan that Saved D-Day
  • Author: L. Douglas Keeney
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 343
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • 1 thought on “The Pointblank Directive: Three Generals and the Untold Story of the Daring Plan that Saved D-Day”

    1. The Pointblank DirectiveL. Douglas Keeney is a military historian and researcher - and it shows. His is not the usual blood and guts, look-how-clever-we-were epistle. evidenced by the 21 pages of notes and 6 pages of select bibliography. Rather, it is a thorough investigation and explanation of the Allied plan to use the combined Air Forces to obstruct the Germans in every possible way prior to the invasion on the D-Day landing. Perhaps a Luftwaffe ME109 squadron leader explained it best when he [...]

    2. One of the things I wanted to do when I retired was to get myself up to speed on recent history, especially World War II and later. I've been reading a fair amount on the Cold War and the Second World War, and a lot of it has really been eye-opening, in terms of stuff I wish I had known when I was teaching my AP courses.While this is a pretty good book about the D-Day invasion, it's not particularly eye-opening. Perhaps this is because of some of the other books I've read; perhaps those five yea [...]

    3. A good book on the air war in World War II, mostly centering around England and Europe (8th Air Force). The book seemed to be researched well and the flow and ease of reading were also good (i.e. it didn't read like a straight up documentary). I thought the author did a good job of introducing the characters and made it all the more interesting by the stories he introduced--especially when combining them with the actual words from the men who were fighting. The style of storytelling reminded me [...]

    4. I really enjoyed this book. The book described in detail the fight for air supremacy over Europe before D-Day in June, 1944. The cost in lives and airplanes was pretty amazing. The Luftwaffe did its best to defend Germany from the US and UK bombers and fighters, but in the end they could not overcome the numbers of airplanes the Allies threw against them. Douglas Keeney did a very good job going into the details of the planning and execution of the effort to destroy the Luftwaffe. I would recomm [...]

    5. OK for someone who doesn't know much about the subject, but not interesting to me.The occasional errors and odd interpretations were jarring. P-47s are "agile" (p.59)? It did cover some efforts by the medium bombers and fighters of the Ninth Air Force, but it seemed to be muddied in the telling. It was hard to separate who was bombing what, when, at times.

    6. An amazing story about one man's inspirational actions to rescue the crews of bombers that had been shot down and were being held in eastern European countries. What he accomplished is hard to believe, as well as the risk he took to do so. A fast and captivating read and well worth the time spent doing so.

    7. Great book on the war against the luftwaffe. Very interesting to read about how the conditions were set prior to D-Day. Little attention is payed to this monumental effort by the AAF to take the luftwaffe out of the fight. Great Book!

    8. I enjoyed the research and anecdotal stories. it helped piece together some events for me with the 8th AD and 303 BY which I research. This is a fine title to read on the events leading up to DDay.

    9. Excellent history of the air war in Europe from 1942 to 1945. Well researched with perspectives from Americans, Germans, and British pilots.

    10. Interesting take on WWII that I had not seen before, but the writing is somewhat puerile and he could have added a lot more detail.

    11. Very nice change up from usual look at ETO air war. However, barely mentioned medium and light bomber perspective.

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