Rhetoric and Kairos: Essays in History, Theory, and Praxis

This collection offers the first comprehensive discussion of the history, theory, and pedagogical applications of kairos, a seminal and recently revised concept of classical rhetoric Augusto Rostagni, James L Kinneavy, Richard Leo Enos, John Poulakos, and John E Smith are among the international list of scholars who explore the Homeric and literary origins of kairos, thThis collection offers the first comprehensive discussion of the history, theory, and pedagogical applications of kairos, a seminal and recently revised concept of classical rhetoric Augusto Rostagni, James L Kinneavy, Richard Leo Enos, John Poulakos, and John E Smith are among the international list of scholars who explore the Homeric and literary origins of kairos, the technologies of time keeping in antiquity, the role of right timing in Hippocratic medicine, the improvisations of Gorgias, as well as the uses of kairos in Isocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and the New Testament Broad in its scope, the book also examines the distinctive philosophies of time reflected in Renaissance Humanism, Nineteenth Century American Transcendentalism, Oriental art and ritual, and the application of kairos to contemporary philosophy, ethics, literary criticism, rhetorical theory, and composition pedagogy.
Rhetoric and Kairos Essays in History Theory and Praxis This collection offers the first comprehensive discussion of the history theory and pedagogical applications of kairos a seminal and recently revised concept of classical rhetoric Augusto Rostagni

  • Title: Rhetoric and Kairos: Essays in History, Theory, and Praxis
  • Author: Phillip Sipiora
  • ISBN: 9780791452349
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Rhetoric and Kairos: Essays in History, Theory, and Praxis”

    1. Great book. I am assuming all the authors read each other's works and content edited their essays to incorporate different aspects of the other essays. The first chapter was the best. Some chapters were very good, a few were quite dry, three were theoretical mumbo jumbo. The post-essay comments were helpful.I think if a non-academic content editor took a swipe at it, s/he would have been able to keep it from being too redundant. How many definitions of kairos does there need to be? It's a very o [...]

    2. Three of the first four essays (Sipiora, Rostagni, and Kinneavy) were really good overviews of the history and meaning of kairos . Once the topics turned to kairos in different periods of history, the essays seemed to have too little reward for the time and effort to read them. Perhaps if I were an expert in rhetoric it would have been different.Dividing the book roughly into thirds, I read the first carefully, skimmed the second, and skipped the third.

    3. Sipiora and Baumlin need better editors. This book was, for the most part, heavy-handed and navel-gazing. Someone from outside of their circle really needed to be involved to provide a better sense of the project, some objectivity (though that word is troubling). There are chapters I would recommend, but I can't say the same for the book as a whole.

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