Jesus Legend, The: A Case for the Historical Reliability of the Synoptic Jesus Tradition

Even mature Christians have trouble defending the person and divinity of Christ The Jesus Legend builds a convincing interdisciplinary case for the unique and plausible position of Jesus in human history He was real and his presence on the planet has been well documented.The authors of the New Testament didn t plant evidence, though each writer did tell the truth from aEven mature Christians have trouble defending the person and divinity of Christ The Jesus Legend builds a convincing interdisciplinary case for the unique and plausible position of Jesus in human history He was real and his presence on the planet has been well documented.The authors of the New Testament didn t plant evidence, though each writer did tell the truth from a unique perspective This book carefully investigates the Gospel portraits of Jesus particularly the Synoptic Gospels assessing what is reliable history and fictional legend The authors contend that a cumulative case for the general reliability of the Synoptic Gospels can be made and boldly challenge those who question the veracity of the Jesus found there.
Jesus Legend The A Case for the Historical Reliability of the Synoptic Jesus Tradition Even mature Christians have trouble defending the person and divinity of Christ The Jesus Legend builds a convincing interdisciplinary case for the unique and plausible position of Jesus in human hist

  • Title: Jesus Legend, The: A Case for the Historical Reliability of the Synoptic Jesus Tradition
  • Author: Paul Rhodes Eddy Gregory A. Boyd
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 442
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Jesus Legend A Case for the Historical Reliability of The Jesus Legend A Case for the Historical Reliability of the Synoptic Jesus Tradition Paul Rhodes Eddy, Gregory A Boyd on FREE shipping on qualifying offers Even mature Christians have trouble defending the person and divinity of Christ The Jesus Legend builds a convincing interdisciplinary case for the unique and plausible position of Jesus in human history. Lord or Legend Wrestling with the Jesus Dilemma Lord or Legend Wrestling with the Jesus Dilemma Gregory A Boyd, Paul R Eddy on FREE shipping on qualifying offers DID JESUS Darren Criss, Jesus Christ Superstar s John Legend Darren Criss in American Crime Story and John Legend, Brandon Victor Dixon, and Sara Bareilles in Jesus Christ Superstar Live John Legend Opens Up About Playing Jesus He Was a Bit of He sang about Ordinary People, but John Legend is taking on an extraordinary role The Grammy, Oscar and Tony winner, , will play the title role in NBC s upcoming Jesus Christ Superstar Go Inside Jesus Christ Superstar Live , Starring John Legend Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice s Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert aired on NBC April . FLIP THROUGH OUR EXCLUSIVE JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR LIVE IN CONCERT PLAYBILL Oscar and Grammy winner John Legend Started Juicing Before Jesus Christ Superstar Just like Jesus Christ himself, John Legend enjoyed a Last Supper of sorts to prepare to play the lead role in Sunday s Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert Teigen who s expecting her Who is Hiram Abiff Who is Hiram Abiff If the song leaders across the country were to stand on the platforms on Sunday morning and ask the members of the church, Who was killed, buried and raised from the grave , the majority of members would immediately respond with the name Jesus. Jesus Christ Superstar Live John Legend Draws Raves on NBC s Easter night telecast of Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert sparked than a few hosannas on social media Reaction to the live staging of the vintage rock opera from Andrew Is the Legend True Did Jesus Write a Letter to King Abgar The obvious answer to our titular question is, of course, no Jesus left no writings, and that wasn t an oversight or something on his to do list that he forgot Christianity is not nor has it Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert NBC Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert Watch the special on NBC and the NBC App John Legend stars in the reimagined rock opera.

    1 thought on “Jesus Legend, The: A Case for the Historical Reliability of the Synoptic Jesus Tradition”

    1. Boyd and Eddy set out to refute the charge of the hyperskeptical community that Jesus never existed. Though the majority of their arguments are solid, the broad scope of their aim greatly limits their punch, as they often have to leave out critical details. This is especially evident in their defense of the legitimacy of the Josephus' testimony about Jesus: having read J.P. Meier's arguments for its legitimacy, I know that the position that Robert Price and Earl Doherty take against it is border [...]

    2. In this excellent work, the authors covered so much; touching on the Jewishness of first century Palestine, whether Jesus was just one among the legends, myths and divine men. They took a look at the extra-biblical references to Christ and whether or not Paul was concerned with the Historical Jesus. They spent a lot of time writing about the new discoveries made concerning oral traditions and how modern biblical scholarship is often done from a post-Gutenberg perspective that doesn't take into a [...]

    3. The best and worst thing about The Jesus Legend is that it's an academic work. Best, because it isn't just a popular work of apologetics-- it really engages with scholarly debate on its own terms, making a clear case without sacrificing either seriousness or readability. Worst, because it makes a ton of points that would be valuable in a more popular context, but they're lost in the ultra-structured, jargonistic academic discourse that Boyd and Eddy adopt. The authors are just a bit too aggressi [...]

    4. The Jesus Legend - Paul Eddy & Gregory BoydI did it. I finished the book and enjoyed a small sense of accomplishment as this was a significant effort. The Jesus Legend is a sometimes tedious and always humorless polemic against New Testament scholars who discount literal readings of the Synoptics. Eddy/Boyd identify, categorize and then dismiss every argument they encounter for a less historical interpretation of Matthew, Mark and Luke. As the subtitle makes clear, this is a polemic, not a w [...]

    5. Finally put in the 3.5 hours of reading the footnotes (at a very fast speed) to finish this up. I had Paul Rhodes Eddy as a professor in college, and I remember him showing me his text documents full of bibliographies that he keeps, so it makes sense that the footnotes would be so extensive. It'll be cool to see if they update this great resource soon to include more from Bauckham's "Jesus and the Eyewitnesses" (a book that they say was in the final stages of publication when they published this [...]

    6. In this "Christianity Today" book of the year (Biblical Studies category), Eddy and Boyd provide a rigorous and scholarly defense for the historical reliability of the synoptic gospels. After setting the ground rules by describing an "open historical-critical method" for examining the evidence, they address eight major lines of argument that are commonly used by those who argue that the Jesus we read of in the New Testament is either fully or mostly a legend:Naturalism -- the argument that super [...]

    7. This was an excellent book for those interested in the study of the historical Jesus. It tackles the issues for those who postulate that Jesus is nothing more than a myth and the gospels are filled with glaring historical inaccuracies. It is fairly comprhensive in its treatment of the issues. It relies heavily on theories of oral transmission and debunks form criticism and radical redation criticism. It deals with the theories that Jesus is a legend, Paul was silent on Jesus, deals with external [...]

    8. Finally found a book that actually engages with the "Jesus legend" hypothesis. It's not surprising that authors don't engage with it as it is an extremely weak position, but nevertheless it is good to have a full book length engagement with the theory. The authors in this work engage in worldview presuppositions, parallels between rising/dying Gods and Hellenization of Galilee, corroboration in Paul, Josephus, Tacitus and others, oral transmission phase (on of my favorite sections along with Pau [...]

    9. The Jesus Legend considers the arguments of how accurate the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke) are using primarily high-criticisim with some use of low-criticisim. It also engages arguments from the moderns, post-moderns and naturalists concerning the reliability of the ancient texts in general. In addition, the text asks the reader to recognize that first century societies were oral-based. In addition, early Christianity developed in a Jewish Torah-centered monotheistic mind set. Overal [...]

    10. Very thorough and clearly written. This book responds, one by one, to major arguments against the historical reliability of the Synoptic Gospels -- by explaining first those arguments "con" and then the authors' responses and their affirmative case for reliability. The book addresses everything from metaphysical/philosophical presuppositions to specific arguments about particular Gospel and secondary texts and archaeological findings. The book has an abundance of citations to source materials. V [...]

    11. Interesting read. Not entirely what I expected, but I think that is a good thing. They focus on the bigger picture of how modern scholars tend to do history rather than nitpicking over specific passages in detail, which is both good and bed. It got a bit repetitive at times as they continually explain and re-explain the idea of the oral tradition. It is a good and powerful point, but it didn't need to be reiterated as often as it was.

    12. A spirited if somewhat prolix defense against the claim that the Gospels are fictitious. The authors, however, choose to defend only the Synoptic Gospels with very little mention of the Fourth Gospel. By failing to defend the Fourth Gospel, have they made a tacit admission that it lacks historical value?

    13. Not sure how much information I retained but it was very informative I'll have to reread sometime in the near future.

    14. This is one of the best books I've ever read on the Jesus tradition, the synoptic problem, and the philosophical baggage that people bring to the table when developing their own theories.

    15. There's a lot about orality studies. How stories are passed on by recitations. It is proposed that the written gospels are based on forms of oral narratives.

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