Not from Here: A Memoir

When Allan Johnson asked his dying father where he wanted his ashes to be placed, his father replied without hesitation that it made no difference to him at all In his poignant, powerful memoir, Not from Here, Johnson embarks on an extraordinary, 2,000 mile journey across the Upper Midwest and Northern Plains to find the place where his father s ashes belonged As a whiWhen Allan Johnson asked his dying father where he wanted his ashes to be placed, his father replied without hesitation that it made no difference to him at all In his poignant, powerful memoir, Not from Here, Johnson embarks on an extraordinary, 2,000 mile journey across the Upper Midwest and Northern Plains to find the place where his father s ashes belonged As a white man with Norwegian and English lineage, Johnson explores both America and the question of belonging to a place whose history holds the continuing legacy of the displacement, dispossession, and genocide of Native peoples More than a personal narrative, Not from Here illuminates the national silence around unresolved questions of accountability, race, and identity politics, and the dilemma of how to take responsibility for a past we did not create Johnson s story about the past living in the present of redemption, fate, family, tribe, and nation of love and grief raises profound questions about belonging, identity, and place.
Not from Here A Memoir When Allan Johnson asked his dying father where he wanted his ashes to be placed his father replied without hesitation that it made no difference to him at all In his poignant powerful memoir Not f

  • Title: Not from Here: A Memoir
  • Author: Allan G. Johnson
  • ISBN: 9781439912454
  • Page: 395
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Not from Here: A Memoir”

    1. A deeply personal journey of grief, family, and self reflection. Allan Johnson's writing was at time lyrical. I have lost both of parents in the last few years so a lot of the emotions expressed struck a deep chord.The lossAllan G Johnson's father leads him on an important journey through his history and begs the questions of where home truly is. Profound and thought-provoking.

    2. This is not only an exquisitely crafted memoir of a son seeking a place for his father’s ashes. This is not only an exploration of the right relationship between the living and the dead, the ethical and emotional responsibilities we have to each other. This is also a heartbreaking and exact investigation of the ways our ancestors call us into the vortex of history, demanding that we confront and respond to the deeds done, the harm wreaked on the land and the Native people who were here before [...]

    3. Beautifully written memoir of identity and place, how they have become so interconnected and how they define who we think we are, and who we'd like to be. A definite recommended read.

    4. Allan is on a quest to find the perfect place for his father's ashes. His father told him it didn't matter at all where his ashes went. To Allen, this just wasn't good enough. He sets out to find the perfect place for his father's ashes. Not From Here is his quest and reflections on where home might be for someone who traveled throughout his life.I think this memoir was well written. Allan asks all the important questions in his journey. Is one place better then another? Who really owns the land [...]

    5. When Allan Johnson’s father, a former US Diplomat, tells him that it “makes no difference to me,” where his ashes can be scattered, it sets Johnson on a soul rending journey as he thinks about place and home and where they are truly located. The result is Not From Here a wondering memoir about grieving and identity, both personal and racial.As Johnson traverses the upper reaches of the northern plains and sees and hears stories about his father and ancestors who come from Norway and settle [...]

    6. I liked this book. The writing is excellent, but it is directed at a specific audience. Middle aged, white, grieving, or contemplative men will see themselves and the search for identity here. Well written and interesting, I would most use the work contemplative to describe it. The writing is reminiscent of Frost in its imagery. I think the connections that readers make to this book will be individual and private; but deep and interesting.

    7. "He is always examining concepts and feelings from multiple angles-fully embracing the complexity of lived experience and the ways that the dead and the living are interconnected."read more: likeiamfeasting/20

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