In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images and the Ironies of Creativity

In this updated edition to his fascinating exploration of the ironies of creativity, Thomas West furthers his ground breaking research on how some innovations in computer visualization are making work and education favorable to visual thinkers In the Mind s Eye exposes many popular myths about conventional intelligence by examining the role of visual spatial strenIn this updated edition to his fascinating exploration of the ironies of creativity, Thomas West furthers his ground breaking research on how some innovations in computer visualization are making work and education favorable to visual thinkers In the Mind s Eye exposes many popular myths about conventional intelligence by examining the role of visual spatial strengths and verbal weaknesses in the lives of eleven gifted individuals, including Albert Einstein, Winston Churchill, Thomas Edison, and others West cites research in neuroscience that shows a link between visual talents and verbal difficulties, and he believes that new developments in computer technology herald a significant shift toward the increased use of visual approaches throughout the economy These changes may be as revolutionary as the technology of the book, which translated ideas into written words The use of visualization and virtual reality computer displays has already begun to move out of the world of science into that business, representing marketing trends through moving pictures rather than tiresome charts and tables of numbers According to West, creative visual thinkers many of whom have had difficulty with verbal skills , aided by computers, will be at the forefront of innovation in a dramatically changing society.
In the Mind s Eye Visual Thinkers Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties Computer Images and the Ironies of Creativity In this updated edition to his fascinating exploration of the ironies of creativity Thomas West furthers his ground breaking research on how some innovations in computer visualization are making work

  • Title: In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images and the Ironies of Creativity
  • Author: Thomas G. West
  • ISBN: 9781573921558
  • Page: 113
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People with Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images and the Ironies of Creativity”

    1. This is not my review, but it is from Thomas West's bloginthemindseyedyslexicrenaissanLearning to SeeThe theme of the late-bloomer reappears again and again with Churchill. He was not an early reader, but greatly loved reading once he became proficient. He had difficulty with speech as a youth, but developed, in time, an extraordinary sensitivity and skill with language. He seemed to be poor in nearly every aspect of school, until his late teens when, at Sandhurst, he developed with great rapidi [...]

    2. This book is very interesting, though I'm not sure that Faraday, Maxwell and Einstein had Dyslexia- maybe learning difficulties though. Finding other ways to communicate at a different plane, like the visual-spatial, isn't new though. I enjoyed the profiles very much.

    3. If you imagine that you are a visual thinker, then this book is for you. If you think your friend or partner is a little strange, then this book is for you. In the Mind's Eye is a real eye opener.

    4. I found this book at a thrift shop while on vacation, I don't think I would have ever run into it otherwise. I was pleasantly surprised.In the Mind's Eye reads into the strengths of visual thinking, and how those with verbal weakness like dyslexics often have unrecognized advantages to make up for it.Personally I am a rather verbal thinker, but the book was thought provoking nonetheless. I got a peek into the mind of figures like Da Vinci, Einstein and Tesla, and gained some understanding of my [...]

    5. A difficult book to read. High brow and at times academic, hard to maintain my interest, but worth reading merely for the subject matter. However the last half of the book appeared to drone on and on. Though the author does state not all of the book needs to be read. I found the case studies of those with dyslexic traits the most interesting. Really I was a little disappointed that there isn't an audio version of the book, as reading felt like a coursework university requirement. Overall a refer [...]

    6. Dense stuff. Have to read it. Have. To. Read. It. Supposedly, it will give me clues into myself and Eli.

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