The Book of Khartoum: A City in Short Fiction

Nestled on the confluence of the Blue and White Niles, the city of Khartoum has, for two centuries, been a focal point for both imperialism and rebellion, a breeding ground for revolutionary fervor, begrudging target for international criticism, and a refuge for hundreds of thousands of people displaced by wars conducted from this city The Book of Khartoum provides an intNestled on the confluence of the Blue and White Niles, the city of Khartoum has, for two centuries, been a focal point for both imperialism and rebellion, a breeding ground for revolutionary fervor, begrudging target for international criticism, and a refuge for hundreds of thousands of people displaced by wars conducted from this city The Book of Khartoum provides an intimate tour of this city through the eyes of 10 of its best authors, representing a wide array of literary schools and political stances from the social realism of old Communist stalwarts, to the fantastical abstraction of a new generation of Sudanese writers.
The Book of Khartoum A City in Short Fiction Nestled on the confluence of the Blue and White Niles the city of Khartoum has for two centuries been a focal point for both imperialism and rebellion a breeding ground for revolutionary fervor b

  • Title: The Book of Khartoum: A City in Short Fiction
  • Author: Raph Cormack Max Shmookler
  • ISBN: 9781905583720
  • Page: 226
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Book of Khartoum: A City in Short Fiction”

    1. I enjoyed reading the book because most of the short stories were written in a very smooth way that teleported me to Sudan. I liked the creative idea behind "The Tank" short story and how a civilian was using a tank for his transportation. Also "In The City" short story and how a young person from the village tried to cope with life in the city. One more short story I liked is "A boy playing with dolls" because it took me to my childhood games when I used to play with my toys and imaginations. A [...]

    2. Short contextual stories of KhartoumThe books has interesting short stories that give some insights of culture and relationships, as well as past glories of the people of Sudan.

    3. I'd ordered this before the travel ban, but in its wake, I thought it was important to understand and highlight the humanity and commonness of people from these countries. Sometimes difficult reading, but well worth it for a glimpse of a sometimes similar, sometimes difficult way of life.

    4. I really enjoyed 'The Void' and 'The Passage' but was less impressed with some of the stories such as 'The Butcher's Daughter'. Overall, a quite nice collection.

    5. This book was featured in the Nota Benes section of the January 2017 issue of World Literature Today Magazineliteraturetoday/

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