The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East

Renowned blogger and Middle East expert Juan Cole takes us inside the youth movements in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, showing us how activists used technology and social media to amplify their message and connect with like minded citizens The New York Times in this rousing study of the Arab Spring Publishers Weekly, starred review.For three decades, Cole has sought tRenowned blogger and Middle East expert Juan Cole takes us inside the youth movements in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya, showing us how activists used technology and social media to amplify their message and connect with like minded citizens The New York Times in this rousing study of the Arab Spring Publishers Weekly, starred review.For three decades, Cole has sought to put the relationship of the West and the Muslim world in historical context In The New Arabs he has written an elegant, carefully delineated synthesis of the complicated, intertwined facets of the Arab uprisings, Kirkus Reviews , illuminating the role of today s Arab youth who they are, what they want, and how they will affect world politics.Not all big groups of teenagers and twenty somethings necessarily produce historical movements centered on their identity as youth, with a generational set of organizations, symbols, and demands rooted at least partially in the distinctive problems of people their age The Arab Millennials did And, in a provocative, big picture argument about the future of the Arab world, The New Arabs shows just how they did it Engaging, powerful, and comprehensive The book feels as indispensable to scholars as it is insightful for a casual reader Los Angeles Times.
The New Arabs How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East Renowned blogger and Middle East expert Juan Cole takes us inside the youth movements in Tunisia Egypt and Libya showing us how activists used technology and social media to amplify their message a

  • Title: The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East
  • Author: Juan Cole
  • ISBN: 9781451690408
  • Page: 145
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East”

    1. If you read this, you're going to learn everything you could want to know about the mindset of the youth involved in the government uprisings in Egypt, Tunisia, and Libya. You're going to learn how democracy might just eventually take hold. And you're going to read a lot of facts. Plenty of facts. And quite a bit of data to support those facts. Everything's tied together nicely, but it's hard to get over the fact that this story's sort of already been told. In fact, much of the story was told on [...]

    2. Alhamdullilah! I am finally finished with this very important, very informative, and very difficult book. "Finally", not because it was too long or anything like that, but because I needed to put it down every few pages to refocus my glazing over eyes and attention. The "problem" is that we in the U.S.(well, at least me) imagine that we know what is going on in this part of the world, when in fact we know next to nothing. I began this book hardly recognizing any of the individuals or political o [...]

    3. I won a copy of this book from FirstReads program. This book was a little dry and a little too detailed. The organizing scheme mostly included multiple countries in each chapter trying to hit a thematic note. The revolutions were very horizontal so many many people were involved. The mixing of countries and the level of detail combined to make it hard to follow at times. Many interviewees were listed by a name along with describing participants making for just too many people to keep track off. [...]

    4. Cole's take on the Arab Spring revolutions of Libya, Tunisia and Egypt was refreshing for me because it offered the perspective of the activists who were actually behind the uprisings. I felt I was able to understand more fully the motivations and sentiments of these youth movements than from my previous exposure by Western news media sources. It was nice to get out of the U.S.-centric mindset. The book is a bit dense, more scholarly than narrative, and at times I found it very hard to really fo [...]

    5. We have made this revolution. Our families were used to keeping quiet. We didn’t keep quiet. We went out to get our dream.On 17 December 2010, Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire after a long tryst with frustration and hopelessness - frustrated at being extorted indiscriminately, hopelessness with the bleak future that greeted him in an oppressed regime that was run akin to a cartel and denied basic human rights to many. His martyrdom brought to the surface the dormant resentment among the Ar [...]

    6. An examination of the Arab Spring as it occurred in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, three countries that overthrew their governments during that period with very different outcomes. Cole had a lot more information about what happened in Tunisia and Egypt than in Libya, but it still made for an interesting comparison. The big limitation of the book is that all three stories aren't necessarily over yet--something that Cole himself acknowledges. In fact, despite the unambiguously negative (IMHO) outcomes in [...]

    7. I generally enjoyed this book (I read it for my political science class). However, it has so much information that it was very overwhelming, and I think the book could have been better with a reorganization. I couldn't keep the facts and stories I had learned straight, though I think having read it as part of a class actually made it easier. In the end, I'm glad that Cole is advocating for the importance of youth and his optimism towards the Middle East.

    8. The young Arabs of the Millennial Generation are more into technological innovations than their ancestors and are using it to make major changes in the Middle East. This work is an examination of that social movement.

    9. This book is a long read. To put it shortly it says the new young Arabs are demanding democracy and no more dictators. They want bread, liberty, and social justice.

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