Trafalgar: Countdown to Battle, 1803-1805

The Battle of Trafalgar is well known for the magnanimous nature of the British victory, even though it cost the nation its greatest hero Lord Admiral, Horatio Nelson For this reason, the battle itself has been remembered as a momentary success, the resulted only from a stroke of immediate genius or from a brief plan But as Alan Schom shows, the Battle of 21 October 1805The Battle of Trafalgar is well known for the magnanimous nature of the British victory, even though it cost the nation its greatest hero Lord Admiral, Horatio Nelson For this reason, the battle itself has been remembered as a momentary success, the resulted only from a stroke of immediate genius or from a brief plan But as Alan Schom shows, the Battle of 21 October 1805, a meeting of the might of the British and French navies, was the result of a strategy laid out by the British Admiralty two years earlier, in 1803 The period from that year until the Battle of Trafalgar was known as the Great Terror , when British naval forces were on constant alert for attacks by the Frenchman Various political figures are written about, debating manoeuvres and quota of ships to be constructed, and putting down mutinies Exploring previously unexplored archives of both England and France, Schom places Trafalgar in the context of the era He draws portraits of the key personnel on both sides, such as Dumouriez, Decr s, Talleyrand, Berthier, Pitt, Cornwallis and Castlereagh There is also a comprehensive discussion of the growth of the French naval fleet, helped by Dutch ships, and the preparations to build ports, which were hampered by their extraordinary costs and inclement weather There are detailed descriptions of the fleets meeting during the run in to Trafalgar, and Schom is engaging and sometimes humorous in his commentary on events He also debunks several myths which should put an end to certain debates pertaining to a great battle of modern history A riveting narrativeLively, dramatic Kirkus Reviews Fresh and ever interestingTriumphantly justifies adding to an already crowded bookshelfThe style is vigorous, the narrative packed with facts but relieved with excellently chosen quotations and off beat insights The Sunday Times Deftly drawn biographies bring to life the principal actors in the great dramaA thoroughly researched and splendidly written book The Los Angeles Times Book Review Alan Schom was a professor of French and European history before retiring to write full time He is the author of Emile Zola A Biography and the forthcoming One Hundred Days The Road to Waterloo Endeavour Press is the UK s leading independent digital publisher For information on our titles please sign up to our newsletter at endeavourpress Each week you will receive updates on free and discounted ebooks Follow us on Twitter EndeavourPress and on Facebook via on.fb 1HweQV7 We are always interested in hearing from our readers Endeavour Press believes that the future is now.
Trafalgar Countdown to Battle The Battle of Trafalgar is well known for the magnanimous nature of the British victory even though it cost the nation its greatest hero Lord Admiral Horatio Nelson For this reason the battle itsel

  • Title: Trafalgar: Countdown to Battle, 1803-1805
  • Author: Alan Schom
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 349
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • 1 thought on “Trafalgar: Countdown to Battle, 1803-1805”

    1. An interesting book. . . . This is a work that explores what led up to the dramatic battle at Trafalgar where Lord Nelson wrecked the combined French and Spanish Fleet. But as this book notes, the prelude was also important to understand. It made Nelson's victory at Trafalgar possible.In the prior two years, there was a challenge to Great Britain from France. Napoleon threatened an invasion of the island, which would depend upon the role of his navy to protect the many ships that would have to t [...]

    2. This account of the lead-up to the Battle of Trafalgar on October 21, 1805, is excellent. It covers the history of Napoleon's fruitless attempt to arrange an invasion of England and the roles that the Royal Navy, the French Navy and the Spanish Navy had in that attempt.The author gives considerable credit to Admiral Sir Cornwallis, brother of the general who surrendered to the American and French forces at Yorktown in 1783. He believes that Cornwallis, who commanded the Channel Fleet during the [...]

    3. 'I never trust a Corsican or a Frenchman' - Admiral Lord Nelson21-OCT-1805 and the brutal Battle of Trafalgar took place. I have walked through Trafalgar Square in London so many times, looking up at Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson perched at the top of the column, and to my shame it is only just now, at the age of 44, that I have read about the battle. Trafalgar Square was constructed in 1840 to commemorate this legendary event. So, what of the book written by Alan Schom. There are, of course, a lo [...]

    4. The complex campaign that culminated at TrafalgarExcellent overview of Napoleon's effort to mount an invasion of Britain and the British campaign to thwart him. Schom discusses the political and financial aspects of both sides'military approaches as well as the strategies, tactics, and leadership of their respective forces. Schom devotes more space to the pagentry of events like Napoleon's coronation and Nelson's funeral than I would have prefered, but aside from that this is an excellent treatm [...]

    5. Enjoyed this book book at time if felt like I just had to plow through. A bit slow in parts and at times the author repeats himself many times do you have to name every ship of the line for both sides or every mourner at Lord Nelson funeral. That said, I was glad I took the time to read this book.

    6. Fascinating.Truly an unputadownable from first page to last page The author has gone deep into the history better than any historian.

    7. Warning, the first few chapters are like watching paint dry but if you stick to it, it is not a bad read.Napoleon may have been a feared leader of armies on Continental Europe but when it came to the sea and the navy, he couldn't organize a drunken brawl at an Irish distillery. He was a control freak who had to make decisions on even the most minute details and changed his mind so frequently his subordinates were hard pressed to keep up.His original plan, conceived in 1803, was to built sufficie [...]

    8. Once upon a time Napoleon planned to invade England. He initiated a massive ship building and recruitment plan to create a cross channel invasion fleet to transport tens of thousands of French soldiers from France to England.Though his planning and leadership were flawed from the start, the English didn't know that. Under the leadership of Lord Cornwallis, England began a years-long Navy-led effort to monitor French developments, patrol the Channel, and to create a fleet under the eventual leade [...]

    9. A well done history of the events leading to the battle of Trafalgar. I appreciated the manner in which the author worked through the years leading up to the battle. I have read many accounts of the battle itself but never the political wrangling ultimately placed Villeneuve and Nelson in that battle. He does a fantastic keeping the narrative easy to follow despite having to cover simultaneous events happening within the French and English governments.

    10. A solid accountThe author strives to place the battle of Trafalgar into its proper context, while also restoring credit to the mostly-forgotten Admiral Cornwallis. I found this clear, and solidly written. Recommended.

    11. Excellent bookHad lots of background on the battle which actually made the book an excellent read. Had trouble putting the book down. Highly recommend.

    12. Good read on an epic battleI enjoyed the book. It is a little light on the actual battle. It is more involved with the politics of the time. But that is interesting as well.

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