Roadside Religion: In Search of the Sacred, the Strange, and the Substance of Faith

In the summer of 2002, Timothy K Beal loaded his family into a twenty nine foot long motor home and hit the rural highways of America in search of roadside religious attractions sites like the World s Largest Ten Commandments and Precious Moments Chapel Roadside Religion tells of his attempts to understand the meaning of these places as expressions of religious imaginatiIn the summer of 2002, Timothy K Beal loaded his family into a twenty nine foot long motor home and hit the rural highways of America in search of roadside religious attractions sites like the World s Largest Ten Commandments and Precious Moments Chapel Roadside Religion tells of his attempts to understand the meaning of these places as expressions of religious imagination and experience, and to encounter faith in all its awesome absurdity.
Roadside Religion In Search of the Sacred the Strange and the Substance of Faith In the summer of Timothy K Beal loaded his family into a twenty nine foot long motor home and hit the rural highways of America in search of roadside religious attractions sites like the World s

  • Title: Roadside Religion: In Search of the Sacred, the Strange, and the Substance of Faith
  • Author: Timothy Beal
  • ISBN: 9780807010631
  • Page: 268
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “Roadside Religion: In Search of the Sacred, the Strange, and the Substance of Faith”

    1. Heard part of an interview with Mr. Beal last month on the Bob Edwards show - I submitted a purchase request to the library and lo & behold, they bought a copy!Timothy Beal, a professor of religion who is also married to a Presbyterian minister, spent a few summers (one with his family in an RV) exploring the world of structures and attractions that people have felt compelled to build to honor and share their faith. Some attractions are more professional and/or commercial - The Holy Land Exp [...]

    2. Ok, not my typical read. This book was ok. It is not my typical read, but rather class material. The author was effective in his goal of a thoughtful and reflective summary of many trips to various American Christian roadside attractions. It can make you think, if you allow yourself to be reflective.

    3. Many of us have noticed the religious attractions – the Christian kitsch – that exist in so many corners of the country, and Timothy Beal argues that we tend to dismiss these sites too quickly. Behind many of these places is a person who has had a meaningful religious experience, and feels called to share it. What fascinates Beal is the “desire to communicate a very personal, perhaps incommunicable religious experience in such a public, even spectacular way.” (11) He and his family trave [...]

    4. Timothy Beal is a religion professor at a university in Ohio; one summer he packed up his family in an RV and toodled around the country looking at kitschy religious theme parks, and the like, to do an analysis. Roadside Religion is the result of this - and several other - forays into this strange world. Among the places he visits are The Holy Land Experience in Orlando, Precious Moments Chapel in Missouri, the world’s largest rosary collection, Noah’s Ark Being Rebuilt in Maryland, and Cros [...]

    5. Very respectful treatment of this topic. I was disappointed that I'd never encountered Cross Gardens, given I lived in Prattville, AL for 2 years. My only complaint is that I wish the book had been longer and covered more sites; this is a testament to my enjoyment of it.

    6. This book tours a uniquely American industry: religious roadside amusements. The findings range from the endearing (Jesus-themed mini-golf), to the crassly commercial (a multimillion dollar Biblical theme park), to the downright weird (a church dedicated to the sappy “Precious Moments” figurines).

    7. Makes me want to get a motor home and drive. But I doubt I'd find the courage to discover all that Beal did here. The armchair travels worked well for me.

    8. A touching and endearing exploration of the "awesome absurdity of faith", as manifested in roadside religious attractions.

    9. I came across this while working on my thesis. I had no idea these places existed: The Golgotha Fun Park, Holy Land USA, and a rebuilding of Noah's Ark. Crazy, cool.

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