The Voyeur's Motel

On January 7, 1980, in the run up to the publication of his landmark bestseller Thy Neighbor s Wife, Gay Talese received an anonymous letter from a man in Colorado Since learning of your long awaited study of coast to coast sex in America, the letter began, I feel I have important information that I could contribute to its contents or to contents of a future book TheOn January 7, 1980, in the run up to the publication of his landmark bestseller Thy Neighbor s Wife, Gay Talese received an anonymous letter from a man in Colorado Since learning of your long awaited study of coast to coast sex in America, the letter began, I feel I have important information that I could contribute to its contents or to contents of a future book The man went on to tell Talese an astonishing secret, that he had bought a motel to satisfy his voyeuristic desires He had built an attic observation platform, fitted with vents, through which he could peer down on his unwitting guests.Unsure what to make of this confession, Talese traveled to Colorado where he met the man Gerald Foos verified his story in person, and read some of his extensive journals, a secret record of America s changing social and sexual s But because Foos insisted on remaining anonymous, Talese filed his reporting away, assuming the story would remain untold Now, after thirty five years, he s ready to go public and Talese can finally tell his story The Voyeur s Motel is an extraordinary work of narrative journalism, and one of the most talked about books of the year.
The Voyeur s Motel On January in the run up to the publication of his landmark bestseller Thy Neighbor s Wife Gay Talese received an anonymous letter from a man in Colorado Since learning of your long awaited

  • Title: The Voyeur's Motel
  • Author: Gay Talese
  • ISBN: 9780802125811
  • Page: 386
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “The Voyeur's Motel”

    1. What am I doing? I asked myself, as I purchased Gay Talese’s The Voyeur’s Motel. What am I doing? I asked myself, as I cracked the front cover. What in the literal hell am I doing? I asked myself, as I began reading the “true” story of a man who bought a motel, installed peep-vents in the ceiling, and then spied on his customers for years, while obsessively recording his observations in a journal. This book is garbage. I knew that long before I read it. Hence, the questioning of myself. [...]

    2. Freaky . Freaky . Creepy!!!!!Gerald Foos is the former owner of the Manor House .a twenty-one room motel near Denver. (Aurora, Colorado). He later owned the Riviera motel, about a 10 minute drive from the Manor House. It was a two-story building with seventy-two rooms. Foos was married with two children. His first wife, Donna assisted Gerald with cutting rectangular-shaped holes in the ceilings of a dozen rooms, each hole measuring six by fourteen inches at the Manor House. His second wife Anita [...]

    3. 3'5 ⭐ Reconozco que me ha enganchado a pesar de no ser lo que esperaba, tal vez es que todos somos en el fondo voyeurs como opina Gerald Foos el dueño del motel. huellalibrosicc.e

    4. The Voyeur’s Motel consists of the confessions of a motel owner and voyeur by the name of Gerald Foos. His lifelong obsession began in childhood, spying on his aunt through the window of her bedroom. It was his purchase in the 1960s of the Manor Park Motel in Aurora, Colorado that provided Foos with the perfect opportunity to indulge in his passion. Having constructed a viewing area above some of the rooms, consisting of a carpeted crawl space and artificial vents in the ceiling, he embarked o [...]

    5. american history seX. prendi una strada della provincia americana, un motel, un proprietario voyeur.hitchcock ci ha costruito sopra uno dei film più memorabili di sempre, basandosi su un romanzo a sua volta ispirato a un serial killer reale. nel libro di gay talese, invece, di norman bates non ce ne sono. ed essendo anche questo tratto da fatti realmente accaduti, la comunità e le forze dell'ordine sentitamente ringraziano. la qui presente lettrice invece sprofonda in un tedio di dimensioni ep [...]

    6. I think of this book as 2 creepers for the price of 1. I get it that a defining element of New Journalism is the author inserting him/herself into the story. And I am fascinated by the dark and the weird. However, what Gay Talese does -- and doesn't do -- here infuriates. These guys (Gay and his subject, Gerald) surely have little empathy for their catalog of unsuspecting victims, and as a reader I'd love for either one to have a little taste of that same medicine. There's a big difference betwe [...]

    7. 3.5 stars for this book. This book isn't as explosive as one would think. Yes, an owner of a hotel rigged some rooms and spied on his visitors in various sexual positions and in various sexual arrangements. Nothing shocking was described in the pages of the journal that Gerald Foos would send to Gay Talese over the years. Yes it was an invasion of privacy, but at the same time it was harmless. The guy was curious, and he took it a bit too far. Is he mentally ill? I don't think so. As he got olde [...]

    8. Built around the nonfiction tale of a Colorado motel owner that built observation portals into some of his establishment's rooms, this guy watches how people's private and public images are so very different. He sees everything from a brother and a sister having sex and a priest beating off to a porno mag to a murder. Some of the events seem fanciful due to timing and evidence checked after the fact; however, the truthfulness of the proprietor never really comes into question. Most amazing of al [...]

    9. Posturing as nonfiction, here's really baaad fiction by a basse-bourgeois writer who should forget Sex and stick to writing about bridges. Talese's fantasies are not interesting because he isnotinteresting.

    10. After 50 pages, I wanted to have a shower and throw this book in the trash where it belongs. This is a "true life" account of a hotel owner who spied on his guests for years and of the author who joined him in his voyeurism in the name of "journalism." The question here is not how the motel owner got away with it, or even why he did it, but rather why Talese thinks we want to read about it. There is nothing compelling here - it is just repugnant and repulsive. The fact that no guest names are re [...]

    11. Hay que tener algo de voyeur para leer este libro porque de lo contrario va a ser una experiencia desagradable.El motel del voyeur comienza con Gay Talese contando cómo llegó a conocer esta historia: una carta recibida en los años 80 en la que un hombre le cuenta que es un voyeur y tiene un motel adaptado para espiar a sus huéspedes, un viaje al lugar para conocer el laboratorio de observación del voyeur y más de 20 años de cartas del voyeur con anotaciones respecto a sus observaciones.El [...]

    12. Suppongo che mister Gay Talese si sia pentito di aver scritto questo libro, che tra accuse di mancanza di etica (abbastanza fondate, direi) e di carenza di attendibilità (pare infatti che Gerald Foos, il soggetto ossessionato dalla volontà di ficcare il naso negli affari altrui di cui il giornalista americano ci narra, abbia mentito su parecchi fatti) non gli ha certo fruttato né consensi, né soddisfazioni.Se a questo aggiungiamo che la vita di questo indefesso voyeur non viene presentata al [...]

    13. This just fed my persistently nosy mentality. Part of me is horrified by this -- horrified that I slurped this book up in less than 3 hours of reading, horrified that this went on and he never got caught, horrified for all those people who never had any idea that someone was violating one of their fundamental human rights. But it's like a bad car accident, or a crime scene -- you just can't look away. I have a hard time believing that Talese would publish this book if he didn't feel confident ab [...]

    14. This book is disturbing on so many levels, but as in coming upon a horrific accident or inadvertently catching a member of the opposite sex in the nude, your first reaction is to turn away, but your gaze is riveted for a fleeting second and you take it all in. Such is the case with The Voyeur's Motel by Gay Talese who is one of the writers, such as Hunter Thompson and Tom Wolfe, who was part of the new journalism of the 1960s. It seems that at 84 he's still pushing the boundaries of journalism. [...]

    15. Si la idea era contar la experiencia de un voyeur como pionero de la investigación sexual (como Gerald Foos quería ser recordado), el autor ha fallado.Si quería contar la historia de un mirón, con relatos de poca profundidad, desordenados y aburridos. Lo logró. Suerte que no supe antes toda la controversia que causó la publicación de este libro, o sino hubiera tenido las expectativas muy altas.

    16. Like a lot of readers, my interest for this book began with the article published in The New Yorker, a weekly I've been subscribed to since 2004. I have a feeling that I maybe should have left things that way.After waiting forever for the paperback to come out, I finally received the book a few months ago and immediately began reading it. I quickly realised that it was an expansion of the article, with only small details added, and Gerald Foo's life narrated with way more depth. I wouldn't say i [...]

    17. I was very much looking forward to reading this one. It is a terribly creepy idea that a man, and sometimes other people, were observing guests without their knowing. I wanted to know more. However, what I got instead was a terrible story of things that may, or more likely, never happened. There were frequent inconsistencies in the story, both with dates and people and their behaviors. Nearly half the book consisted of excepts from this "journal" which read like Penthouse letters. I am not reall [...]

    18. A predictable humoxygen deprived sex,ergo the reader condemnedin a stupor, on and onof prefabricated prosethe IKEA of non-fictionand who shops thereanymore for morethan lessthere will bea test.Loosethe floodgates of mediocritynow this high bounding seacutting the sun into threeand now I must save all of mebrah, fight for your life.Gore Vidal is that suck planet.Chris Roberts, Sudden God

    19. I wonder why Gay Talese got involved in this sordid story? Talese is the reason I decided to read this supposedly true tale of a motel owner who spied on his guests for decades. There's some evidence that the motel owner voyeur's tale is unreliable. In fact, I felt that throughout the narrative. Anyway, I'm sorry I read this.

    20. Asinine. This was like reading some lonely dude's letters to a milder version of Penthouse magazine. I do not doubt that this motel owner spied on hundreds of people over the years, but I doubt the truthfulness of what he witnessed, and I absolutely question his "objective" opinion on what he saw. Terrible journalism on the part of Telese as well.

    21. Le subo una estrella por la polémica que incrementa ese juego del límite del periodista a la hora de avanzar en una historia. Me ha gustado mucho en su conjuntoentremontonesdelibros

    22. This book would have been much more interesting in someone else's hands that would have pushed the creep at the book's center more in his hypocrisy and inconsistencies and looked at the wider scope of the subject as well as found the victims of the voyeurism.

    23. La polémica persigue a “El Motel del Voyeur” desde que Gay Talase hiciera pública la temática de su último libro. Y no es para menos… En esta ocasión, el escritor utiliza sus técnicas de periodismo literario para poner al descubierto las prácticas voyeurísticas de Gerald Foos a lo largo de varias décadas a finales del siglo pasado. Lo particular es que Foos no es uno de esos voyeurs que espían con binoculares desde la atalaya urbana de su ventana oscura, ni mucho menos. Este homb [...]

    24. I read this book after a friend gave it to me saying she thought it would be my cup of tea! It is certainly a fascinating and absorbing tale but after a while I started to wonder how much of it was made up. Loos starts by saying he is a sort of social historian cataloguing sexual and social behavior but the more you read it the more you see that his personality affected what he drew from these observations.In essence Loos was a man compelled to spy on people probably because he had huge problems [...]

    25. Bought this book a while back, and watched the Netflix documentary about a month ago, so thought I should finally pick this up. I got through a few chapters, and finished reading the section where Talese visits Foos' motel and goes up into the attic to observe his customers having sex. After lying awake for a few minutes, disgusted with a journalist who believed he would never be able to tell Foos' story and yet DIDN'T report him to the police in any way, I finally fell asleep in order to have w [...]

    26. “New Journalism” is described in as “a style of news writing and journalism, developed in the 1960s and '70s, which used literary techniques deemed unconventional at the time. It is characterized by a subjective perspective, a literary style reminiscent of long-form non-fiction and emphasizing "truth" over "facts," and intensive reportage in which reporters immersed themselves in the stories as they reported and wrote them. This was in contrast to traditional journalism where the journali [...]

    27. Even for a reading experience like no other, it’s hard to come away from Gay Talese’s “The Voyeur’s Motel” without feeling tainted. The story of a Denver-area motel owner who spent years spying on his guests—and even manipulating situations to control their behavior—leaves the kind of queasy aftertaste with which voyeurs themselves are undoubtedly familiar. Simply reading “The Voyeur’s Motel” presents a moral conundrum. There’s a way of thinking, regarding pornography, that [...]

    28. I probably wouldn't have picked this book up if it hadn't been for the recent controversy about Talese's sketchy source. That appealed to me — a complicated story about an unreliable narrator, with the subtext that he managed to dupe a legendary journalist, has a lot of potential. Sadly, this book fails to meet that promise. There's hardly any of Talese's own observation or thought in The Voyeur's Motel, so we don't get much chance to think about his relationship with the source and how he was [...]

    29. When I read the original excerpt in the New Yorker I was fascinated by this story. The book, however, is only slightly longer than the article and shows how incredibly delusional Gerald Foos was in his belief that he was conducting the most important and impartial commentary on the sex lives of ordinary people. Really what he was was a pretty twisted and immoral guy.As far as Gay Talese's writing--I don't get it. There were a couple of places that the editors seemed to overlook. The fallout from [...]

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