A War Imagined: The First World War and English Culture

Between the opulent Edwardian years and the 1920s, between the England of Pomp and Circumstance, the first Post Impressionist show and Man and Superman and the England of The Waste Land, Facade and The Green Hat, World War I opens like a gap in history, separating one world of beliefs and values from another, and changing not only the map of Europe, but the ways in which mBetween the opulent Edwardian years and the 1920s, between the England of Pomp and Circumstance, the first Post Impressionist show and Man and Superman and the England of The Waste Land, Facade and The Green Hat, World War I opens like a gap in history, separating one world of beliefs and values from another, and changing not only the map of Europe, but the ways in which men and women imagined reality itself Because of the war, England after the war was a different place the arts were different history was different sex, society, class were all different.
A War Imagined The First World War and English Culture Between the opulent Edwardian years and the s between the England of Pomp and Circumstance the first Post Impressionist show and Man and Superman and the England of The Waste Land Facade and Th

  • Title: A War Imagined: The First World War and English Culture
  • Author: Samuel Hynes
  • ISBN: 9780689121289
  • Page: 188
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “A War Imagined: The First World War and English Culture”

    1. Hynes book is an amazing account of the culture of the First World War and its enduring influences. It's a bit dense -- not so much densely written, as dense with ideas -- but worth reading slowly and carefully. Some of his ideas have perhaps already been seen in Fussell's The Great War and Modern Memory - particularly the argument of an "ironic" or "satirical" post-war tone to English literature, but Hynes perhaps does a better job of tracing its roots and why it is such a prevalent understandi [...]

    2. The pointless slaughter and dispiriting trench warfare of WWI swept away a large portion of the generation that fought it. It also swept away many of the beliefs and institutions on which society had been based, leaving nothing in their place. The result was the "lost generation" of rootless writers and artists described by Gertrude Stein.This book shows how WWI art and culture in England, with occasional references to America, France, and other countries. The author includes topics such as orga [...]

    3. Terrific exegesis of WWI and its literary/artistic aftermath. (I actually used to read books like this, often.)

    4. Having written on Forster for a term paper, I decided to keep treading through British literary history, past the Edwardians and into the Great War. This text juxtaposes the many incongruous movements that we now collectively refer to as a cohesive whole: Modernism. As quick as we are to make generalized statements about what Modernism entails, we forget that at the time, it was not a cohesively realized movement. Much like the post-war narratives by Woolf, Lawrence, and Eliot, among others, Mod [...]

    5. A very important literary-critical evaluation of the war not only as seen through literature, but of the war as literature. Hynes acknowledges that the general conception of the war as a futile, uniquely terrible, cultural-rifting, etc. enterprise is a myth, but continues to assert the value of that myth over whatever may have really happened from time to time. Very well-written, but possibly infuriating -- I like it all the same.

    6. OK, 4.5 stars. I might read again if I get through the other 250 books on the list.Intriguing and well-written examination of how English arts dealt with the "historical discontinuity" of World War One and came up with a new "myth of war." Reminds me of Fussell's "The Great War and Modern Memory."

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