The Pedant and the Shuffly

The evil magician Snodrog ensnares his victims with his inescapable logic and transforms them into Flimsies stained handkerchiefs until the kindly sorcerer, Sir Bertram Crabtree Gore Esq enlists the help of a magical Shuffly Latin name Scuffulans Hirsutus d Snodrog meets his match
The Pedant and the Shuffly The evil magician Snodrog ensnares his victims with his inescapable logic and transforms them into Flimsies stained handkerchiefs until the kindly sorcerer Sir Bertram Crabtree Gore Esq enlists the h

  • Title: The Pedant and the Shuffly
  • Author: John Bellairs Brad Strickland Marilyn Fitschen
  • ISBN: 9781887726078
  • Page: 414
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Pedant and the Shuffly”

    1. It's hard not to see this as a very slight appetiser to The Face in the Frost. However, the illustrations by Marilyn Fitschen are fantastic as always.

    2. One reason I love John Bellairs is because of his sense of humor, which for some reason mostly appears in his adult fiction (his children's books are more serious). I feel like it is very similar to my sense of humor, dry and sarcastic and bizarre. The Pedant and the Shuffly is filled with humorous bits, which I will share with you:On nights when the moon was a lost pale pizza floating above the quivering treetopsThis curious escutcheon dated from the siege of Grisly Grange in 982, when Sir Bert [...]

    3. Prior to writing his gothic horror young adult novels, John Bellairs had two books published for adults, this and "The Face in the Frost". In both it is easy to see why his publisher/editor had him change "The House with a Clock in its Walls" to a book geared for children. Bellairs has a flare for lightheartedness and whimsy, even when tackling dark or complex issues. This book is short, but heavy, replete with satire, absurdity, and Bellairs deep interest in "Classical Academics/History", notab [...]

    4. Huge fan of John Bellairs, but I'd only ever read his young adult gothics before today. "The Pedant and the Shuffly" predates those, and is marvelously absurd. Think Roald Dahl, James Thurber and a little Edward Gorey, as well. As much as I really do enjoy his more popular works, it's nice to read a differently-skewed side of Bellairs! Recommended for one and all. The illustrations complement the text nicely, too!

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