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Taking National Poetry Month s poem a day challenge one step further, for her fourth collection, Trista Mateer has not only compiled a chapbook of her 2016 30 for 30 poems, but she has also chosen to include nearly everything else written in the month of April This comes in the form of handwritten notes and poetry fragments, iPhone note poetry, tweets, Craigslist ads, aTaking National Poetry Month s poem a day challenge one step further, for her fourth collection, Trista Mateer has not only compiled a chapbook of her 2016 30 for 30 poems, but she has also chosen to include nearly everything else written in the month of April This comes in the form of handwritten notes and poetry fragments, iPhone note poetry, tweets, Craigslist ads, and This mix of poetry and prose spans a single month and covers topics such as heartbreak, gender, sexuality, and forgiveness.
Redacted Taking National Poetry Month s poem a day challenge one step further for her fourth collection Trista Mateer has not only compiled a chapbook of her for poems but she has also chosen to

  • Title: [Redacted]
  • Author: Trista Mateer
  • ISBN: 9781537539997
  • Page: 117
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “[Redacted]”

    1. Every airport poem smashes into my heart. Which is to say, Trista is one of the most accessible, emotional poets writing today.

    2. Full review at melissaljennings[redacted] is one of the most masterful poetry collections I have ever read. The mixture of form made the poetry satisfying and exhilarating to read. Moreover, some of the titles of Mateer’s poems were amazingly complicated, they seemed like poems themselves. [redacted] is simply a masterpiece. I highly recommend [redacted] as it is a poetry collection which is experimental with form. Its topics are also various and poignant. If you enjoy emotive, abstract poetry [...]

    3. I'd read Trista before, but I'm honestly in love with this book. In love with how raw and honest her words come across, and also how many of them hit very close to home. Something that caught my attention, in the best way possible, was the way she made poems out of such "21st century" things like tweets and e-mails (that e-mail poem? Your e-mail apology doesn't mean shit? Mind!!! blown!!!). So clever, so beautiful, so heartbreakingly real.

    4. "Redacted" is the most personal book of poetry I have read. Trista shows a certain sense of vulnerability by allowing readers glimpses into her personal life - iPhone messages and notes, inner contemplation, and late night musings. A beautiful stand alone, "Redacted" showcases why poetry is still very, very much alive.

    5. Trista's poems are always brilliant, but these felt particularly like a conversations she was having with herself - examining and interrogating poet, poems and public persona - in a way I don't think she did so much in her previous collections. This isn't self-critical as a hollow disclaimer, the poems feel genuine and charming - soft and difficult and beautifully messy, as so many of us find our 20s to be.

    6. JESUS this was good. Holy shit. The mixed media, the words, the everything. Everything about this touched me so intimately.

    7. Wow Wonderful poetry written to strike a match in your heart and gut. Reminding you of your own history of love

    8. Sometimes I say that a book was like reading the poet’s diary. Here I almost want to take out the ‘like’ – this book is the epitome of honesty and openness. It seems like a book dedicated to apologising to everyone Trista feels she has ever hurt in person or via her poetry (and in places explaining to some, that if her words hurt them, good!) I did find it captivating but not as a ‘poetry’ book but simply as the story of the writer – it includes tweets and phone entries and intimat [...]

    9. A collection of poems whose forms are as different as night and day, from classic formats to prose to lists to tweets, but that share their honesty, rawness, heartbreak, feeling.

    10. I am a huge fan of Trista Mateer’s art and poetry. It is always honest and powerful and this book was just incredible. I can’t wait to read more of her work

    11. Don't mind me, just devouring every poem Trista Mateer has ever published at 4am. Her poetry is so addictive and I cannot get enough. Keep them coming please, Trista!!

    12. This book. This tiny, little book. Ripped my guts out and showed them to me. Several times. The potry is quiet, yet powerful. I highly recommend it to anyone who has ever loved.

    13. A Very Good BookI couldn't put it down, I had to make myself stop at times. Well written and honest, it reminded me why people become poets: to give their own pain a place to grieve, and to share in a communal acknowledgement of that pain.

    14. The thing I love the most about today's poetry genre is its raw truth that poems from XV-XIX century lack. Don't get me wrong I love the metaphors that were created back then - and the ones that are being created now - but no matter how beautiful the metaphor is, it never made me feel like I feel after reading a true, raw poem. [Redacted] was a great read that make me feel, think and also kinda make me want to not leave my room for awhile. The best kind of reaction, really.

    15. Loved itPoet Trista Mateer delivers a work of art that is simultaneously heartbreaking and honest. A beautiful, if sad, read; I highly recommend it if you like poetry that reminds of a person you loved even if its smarter to not think about them

    16. Some cool unique stuff going on in here but there can only be so many poems apologizing for writing people poems before I question whether or not there are any poems that aren't apologies. I'm just not a fan of poems that refer to themselves as poems unless it's done super well and sparingly.

    17. I enjoy Trista Mateer's work greatly. It allows me to live a few lives at once because I relate to some aspects of her work, while others are completely foreign to me. But I feel like this one let me down just a little bit. There were fewer lines of pure genius and less images that were new to her, and normally I don't have a problem with reusing an idea or metaphor, but she didn't take them to quite the level the rest of her work would suggest.

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