The Road Gets Better from Here

With virtually no experience and absolutely no support, Adrian rides a basic stock motorbike 20,000kms across nine countries in three months to fulfill a lifelong dream He sets off from the bleak, windswept former gulag gateway city of Magadan in a remote corner of Siberia, but before the day is out he crashes badley, breaking his bike and seriously injuring himself He iWith virtually no experience and absolutely no support, Adrian rides a basic stock motorbike 20,000kms across nine countries in three months to fulfill a lifelong dream He sets off from the bleak, windswept former gulag gateway city of Magadan in a remote corner of Siberia, but before the day is out he crashes badley, breaking his bike and seriously injuring himself He is completely alone He struggles on through swamps, bogs and mud tracks and nearly drowns in the icy rapids along Stalin s infamous Road of Bones Although it is summer in Siberia, it is freezing and the driving rain is relentless When the sun does appear, he is attacked by fierce squadrons of giant mosquitoes and, with wild bears roaming, he cannot stop, often riding for days at a time Sheer physical strength saves his life on numerous occasions He battles on deep into central Russia, across the vast Steppes of Kazakhstan and on through the scaring Taklimakan Desert in remote western China He scales the breathtaking Pamirs and rides across the roof of the world before entering the fabled Silk Road cities of Samarkand, Bukhara and Chive He scurries across oddball Turkmenism, and on across ancient Persia before finally arriving at his destination, exotic Istanbul At every turn, Adrian is adopted by a vast array of characters, each with stories to tell and who, extraordinarily, expect nothing in return tough Siberian truck drivers, frontier road workers, border guards desperate villagers, drug addled soldiers and crazy modern day traders, each insisting that he join them in their homes to share their lives and most of their provisions It is these encounters which provide such a rich and compelling subtext to hisextraordinary journey.
The Road Gets Better from Here With virtually no experience and absolutely no support Adrian rides a basic stock motorbike kms across nine countries in three months to fulfill a lifelong dream He sets off from the bleak win

  • Title: The Road Gets Better from Here
  • Author: Adrian Scott
  • ISBN: 9780980493405
  • Page: 137
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1 thought on “The Road Gets Better from Here”

    1. This is one of those rare books that I wish I could have another star for. I have read 5 star books and I have enjoyed them and they have stuck with me, but The Road Gets Better from Here has that something extra that made it appeal to so many of my interests and senses. Travel, local food, traditions, the hospitality of strangers, isolated villages and people, the natural environment, the man made environment, history, cultures - many many diverse cultures, the middle east, Siberia, Russia, oth [...]

    2. A wonderful, wonderful book. The storyteller and his adventures, the people he met along the way, the humor he used to deal with situations, all of it! I think I was as sad as the author that the journey had to end. This book is now sitting on my shelf waiting for a re-read in the future. There are some editing issues but I easily put those annoyances aside as I got sucked into the journey and the story. If you love travel stories, stories about other cultures and it's people, a comedy, an adven [...]

    3. I enjoyed this travelogue! Adrian Scott, a novice motorcyclist, takes a new and unfamiliar bike on a three month cross country trip from remotest Siberia to Istanbul, the hard way. I can't say it was the smartest thing to do, but I admired his chutzpah! Scott was alone, with no formal support, no companions, and riding a stock motorcycle. He began in the city of Magadan, in remote Siberia, rode along Stalin's horrific Road of Bones, through central Russia and Kazakhstan, traveled across the sere [...]

    4. An interesting but somewhat uneven story of the author's travels through Siberia and along the Silk Road alone via motorcycle. Although the people he met along the journey make for the best portions of the book, by the end it felt like the story had fallen into a predictable pattern -- ride on dangerous roads, solicit the help of locals, spend the night with their hospitality, move on to next section. The journey through Siberia on Stalin-era Road of Bones is one of the most interesting sections [...]

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