Shady Ladies: Nineteen Surprising and Rebellious American Women

Suzann Ledbetter has researched and written about American history for almost twenty years The depth of her work is reflected in these well crafted and enormously entertaining biographies of little known till now Shady Ladies Some were crackpots, some criminals, some charlatans, some genuine talents, but almost all have been sadly forgotten.Unsung though they may be,Suzann Ledbetter has researched and written about American history for almost twenty years The depth of her work is reflected in these well crafted and enormously entertaining biographies of little known till now Shady Ladies Some were crackpots, some criminals, some charlatans, some genuine talents, but almost all have been sadly forgotten.Unsung though they may be, these defiant women challenged post Victorian society in an era when females were second class citizens They are every bit as intriguing as their famous sisters Who knew Harriet Hubbard Ayer and her cosmetic concoctions predated Helena Rubenstein, and that Ayer virtually invented the newspaper advertorial Photographs of Lydia Pinkham were the first photos ever used in advertising A century after her death, modern science has confirmed that her black cohosh laced elixir is a viable treatment for menopausal symptoms The way to a man s heart is through his stomach was coined by Fanny Fern, aka Sara Parton, who, unlike the better known Nellie Bly, became the highest paid newspaper columnist in the country And Laura Fair was as dangerous to men as Calamity Jane ever was and faced up to the Supreme Court no less.Shady Ladies is the story of early American rebels and a fascinating view of the lives of seventeen notorious and notable women Suzann Ledbetter chronicles the exploits of feminist pioneers, bringing them to life with humor, empathy, and meticulous research.
Shady Ladies Nineteen Surprising and Rebellious American Women Suzann Ledbetter has researched and written about American history for almost twenty years The depth of her work is reflected in these well crafted and enormously entertaining biographies of little kn

  • Title: Shady Ladies: Nineteen Surprising and Rebellious American Women
  • Author: Suzann Ledbetter
  • ISBN: 9780765308276
  • Page: 396
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “Shady Ladies: Nineteen Surprising and Rebellious American Women”

    1. I really enjoyed the stories of these rebelliously autonomous women, despite the muddled delivery.

    2. Quite naturally, we tend to hear about women who had staggering or groundbreaking achievements rather than those whose stories were not quite as groundbreaking or "important". Ledbetter has chosen 18 lesser known women and one well known ("Unsinkable Molly Brown) and related their stories--and what stories! I tend to forget, based on overbearing opinions of recent feminists, that women throughout history were able to make their own way and make a difference at times; we just don't hear about the [...]

    3. These biographies of women you've (mostly) never heard of are fascinating. I was enthralled by these little-known characters. I have two quibbles with the book - one small, one larger. The small gripe is that the title is dumb. You can't change the meaning of shady ladies to make it be about rebellious or enterprising women, as opposed to prostitutes. My second gripe is the editing of this book is pretty dismal. While Ledbetter's bios are overall entertaining, she is apparently averse to commas [...]

    4. This book was full of women I've never heard of and women I wanted to hear all about, and it seemed so promising. Unfortunately it lacked good editing, felt more like a huge article (or articles, I guess), and wasn't that interesting or engaging. I finished it but ONLY because I hate to be a quitter.

    5. Only a few of the 19 women from Victorian America were women of ill repute. But all of them were independent, unconventional, and unwilling to let a world stacked against them get in their way. Some were doctors, some were businesswomen, some were lawmakers, some were pioneers - but they all struggled long and hard, and were all absolutely awesome. I'm planning on buying it, it's that good.

    6. It's sad when a good story isn't told well. The stories are interesting but the writing seems to be for the era of the subjects, not today's audience. For example, sex trafficking is called "white slavery" but the copyright is 2006. Huh?

    7. The writing is choppy and lacks clarity. The author uses far too many trite phrases. There are some interesting tidbits, but overall, this makes for ponderous reading.The bibliography is fairly extensive, good for further research.

    8. I like this book. It focuses on 19 famous (or infamous) women from history and the author has a great sense of humor.

    9. Really enjoyed these small chapters entailing adventures and general lives of some truly incredible women.

    10. 2009- Some of the stories were interesting, but the writing wasn't very well done. And some of them were quite short.

    11. This book has ladies with very interesting lives. I just think it could have been more interesting if it was written more in story form. It seemed very much like I was reading a text book.

    12. Some of these stories were interesting, but I think I was expecting a more notorious kind of shady.

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