The Hand of the Necromancer

When Professor Childermass lends a collection of artifacts to a local museum, a collector named Mattheus Mergal appears, demanding to see it Mergal aims to steal a wooden hand with the power to raise the dead, and if he gets his hands on it, no one will be able to stop him from terrorizing the world Can Johnny and the professor halt him in time A spellbinding tale When Professor Childermass lends a collection of artifacts to a local museum, a collector named Mattheus Mergal appears, demanding to see it Mergal aims to steal a wooden hand with the power to raise the dead, and if he gets his hands on it, no one will be able to stop him from terrorizing the world Can Johnny and the professor halt him in time A spellbinding tale School Library Journal
The Hand of the Necromancer When Professor Childermass lends a collection of artifacts to a local museum a collector named Mattheus Mergal appears demanding to see it Mergal aims to steal a wooden hand with the power to raise

  • Title: The Hand of the Necromancer
  • Author: Brad Strickland John Bellairs
  • ISBN: 9780803718296
  • Page: 146
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “The Hand of the Necromancer”

    1. The central concept of Hand of the Necromancer is somewhat less interesting than that of other Bellairs books. The image of the wooden hand seems rather mundane in a series that has a consistent streak of subtle weirdness. Strickland executes the plot well, however, with some good tension and jeopardy, the sneakiest nightmare scene in the whole series, and a creepy snowglobe. The solution came out of the blue somewhat, but that certainly isn't unprecedented in Bellairsland. Hand is perhaps most [...]

    2. I blame Brad Strickland for the terrible ending of "The Doom of the Haunted Opera", a Bellairs manuscript that Strickland completed. John Bellairs wrote young adult fiction but his writing never condescended to his young audience, which is probably why I can still enjoy his books as an adult. Take for example "The Mummy, the Will, and the Crypt", one of my favorites. The story begins with Johnny learning that his grandmother has a brain tumor - and how he discovers that is a chilling scene - but [...]

    3. This was a fun little book based on a John Bellairs character, but written by Brad Strickland. Johnny Dixon is always getting mixed up with the supernatural, and this time it was witchcraft. This book is written for a young audience, but it had some genuinely creepy moments in it. I really like the characters of Johnny and the Professor, but Johnny's little girl friend was annoying to me and I could have done without her. As in a John Bellairs book, there was lots of deliciously spooky atmospher [...]

    4. might've dug this when i was but a wee lass, but reading it now with my batch of ultra-cheap children's mystery stories, i am unimpressed. very neat and tidy and predictable. i didn't realize til i looked at the cover halfway through, wondering what was wrong, that this wasn't actually written by john bellairs. boo on you, brad strickland.

    5. While I can say that I enjoyed the story, and loved my favorite set of Bellairs characters continuing in yet another adventure, there's something off about it. Strickland's work just doesn't have the "push" Bellairs' stories did, although they're still great on their own.

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