The Bell, the Book, and the Spellbinder

In The Bell, the Book, and the Spellbinder, Johnny Dixon s best friend Fergie steals an enchanted book from the library, and slowly falls under the spell of evil sorcerer Jarmyn Thanatos In The Chessmen of Doom, Johnny and his friends must unravel the baffling riddle in Peregrine Childermass s will or an evil madman will unleash a force so powerful it could destroy theIn The Bell, the Book, and the Spellbinder, Johnny Dixon s best friend Fergie steals an enchanted book from the library, and slowly falls under the spell of evil sorcerer Jarmyn Thanatos In The Chessmen of Doom, Johnny and his friends must unravel the baffling riddle in Peregrine Childermass s will or an evil madman will unleash a force so powerful it could destroy the world
The Bell the Book and the Spellbinder In The Bell the Book and the Spellbinder Johnny Dixon s best friend Fergie steals an enchanted book from the library and slowly falls under the spell of evil sorcerer Jarmyn Thanatos In The Chessm

  • Title: The Bell, the Book, and the Spellbinder
  • Author: Brad Strickland John Bellairs
  • ISBN: 9780613243285
  • Page: 493
  • Format: Hardcover
  • 1 thought on “The Bell, the Book, and the Spellbinder”

    1. Johnny Dixon's friend Fergie has found the last book in the library, but unfortunately, instead of making wishes come true as the title implies, it possesses him and puts him in the power of a weird old man who may be hundreds of years old. Not as tight a plot as a real Bellairs, and a bit of extra religion, but a darn good creepy-necromancyy-friends-to-save book.

    2. This is one of the best books in the entire series. A lot of people complain that Brad Strickland isn't as good as Bellairs, that the newer books aren't as great as the old ones they remember. Those people are wrong, and here's why: Most people don't re-read the older books in tandem with the new ones. I've spent the last year re-reading every single book, and comparing each novel, taking notes. I think most people recall the original books fondly, and then pick up one of the Strickland ones tha [...]

    3. This is one of the "John Bellairs" stories written entirely by Brad Strickland after Bellairs' death; and as such, I wasn't expecting to like it very much. I've blamed Strickland for some of the weaker elements in the stories that Bellairs started and he finished. This one, however, seemed to be pure Bellairs through and through in its style and plotting. It contains some genuinely creepy elements: the magical book, the phantom bell, Fergie's plight, and the various undead creatures that appear. [...]

    4. Johnny Dixon's disgruntled friend, Fergie, has grandiose ideas which end in disaster after an encounter with a creepy old man and a magical book. It's up to Johnny, his intelligent schoolmate Sarah, a cranky professor, and a brave priest to save Fergie from imminent destruction. Although dark and sinister, the bonds of friendship and camaraderie make this a sweet story. If I were younger, I'd devour the entire series, but there are too many books and so little time. If only I had a book that cou [...]

    5. Johnny Dixon’s friend Fergie Steals a mysterious book from the library called “The Book of True Wishes” strange things started to happen to them. One of them was that Fergie ran away from his friends Johnny and professor Roderick. Then he hears eerie bells that no one else could hear. Then he gets dreams that seems real to him. The dreams were about a ghost boy trying to warn him about something. Fergie loses control of his body more and more every night after he had lessons about reading [...]

    6. Ever since childhood, the supernatural horror-mysteries of John Bellairs and Brad Strickland have been part of my inner spooky kid's happy place. As a kid they were catnip, and revisiting them as an adult, I can appreciate the way Bellairs and Strickland built an appealing YA universe around the academic-horror styles of British supernaturalists like M. R. James and E. F. Benson. Teenage nerd turned greaser Fergie takes the reins here for a featured adventure, as he grows possessed by a grimoire [...]

    7. To tell the truth,i've NEVER had anobsession with a book as much as this!i would read the whole story again and again![this is my 3rd time:]and i'm so sad that there isn't a movie on it,because this book is just so awesome!and the characters are great!too bad Edward gory died.he illustrated so nicely.i like the frontipiece he made in this book--the last one.R.I.P:[but atleast Brad is still here.i hope he continues making these Johnny Dixon books and someday makes an episode on everyone of them.

    8. I wasn't really a fan of what Strickland did with John Bellairs' characters, they didn't seem true to their prior development in the series. The book felt like an impostor. Character choices and plot development were hand-fed moronic drivel with no catalysts for critical thinking. Maybe I'm going overboard there. Dunno, I'm feeling negatively about the book though. Strickland took a decent outline from Bellairs' notes and inserted shadows of personalities and plot devices.

    9. One in a series, Strickland builds suspense and mystery with an evil sorcerer who will stop at nothing to get eternal life. This is a classroom library must have for students that have trouble getting into books or love a good black magic mystery.

    10. I didn't like this book. I was really disappointed. I've read some John Bellairs books before and liked them, but When Brad Strickland wrote this using John Bellairs Characters I just thought it was weird.

    11. This is a marked improvement over the previous Brad Strickland volume I'd read; this captures the Bellairs flavor.

    12. I read this book in fifth grade and was very creeped out by it. But it was really interesting. I liked it because of the mystery in it.

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